FARMCOLLIE Archives

July 2005

FARMCOLLIE@LIST.UVM.EDU

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Subject:
From:
Paul and Judy <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
Farm Collie Breed Conservancy and Restoration <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Fri, 15 Jul 2005 10:34:51 -0700
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I believe cow hocks are considerd a structural fault in most livestock.  A
hog or market lamb just looks better, fuller and more sound when they have
straight back legs.
Does a cow have cow hocks?  Not in a show!
I think this where we get the idea that horses and dogs shouldn't have such.
I don't think that there is any research that shows the animals travel
better.
Some race horse trainers are even of the opinion that a horse would idealy
be slightly cow hocked in order to throw their hind legs slightly to the
outside of the fronts so there is no danger of interferance.  Now I would
think that draft horses would be better for pulling heavy loads if their
hind legs lined out real straight as most draft horses do. After all, many
of them are still bred in France for horse meat and that is what they want.
However, my neighbor who has purcherons told me that her horses hinds were
so nice and straight that a buyer told her that he wanted a more slightly
cow hocked horse!  He said they can dig in and pull better!
Obviously, opinions vary.
I'm with Jan,  I love a good looking non cow hocked dog.  But I'll take
brains over hocks any day.

Judy

----- Original Message -----
From: "Rini" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2005 9:32 AM
Subject: Re: [FARMCOLLIE] cow hocks


> >
>> I'm curious, does anyone know what would make cow hocks a structural
>> fault
>> for a horse but not a dog?
>
>   I don't know the numbers on this, but horses have enormous amounts of
> weight on very small hooves.  The lower legs, like other animals that
> depend
> on speed to escape predators, are slim and mostly tendons and bone.  The
> muscle is mostly higher up on the leg and body.   So we're talking
> physics -
>

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