FARMCOLLIE Archives

July 2005

FARMCOLLIE@LIST.UVM.EDU

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Subject:
From:
theyoungs <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
Farm Collie Breed Conservancy and Restoration <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Fri, 22 Jul 2005 15:38:39 -0400
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> >We came home last night to find most of our poultry slaughtered.
>

   What an awful experience.  But I have to ask what you think did it.
Despite our best effort we lose some poultry to the maurading hawk, fox or
coyote.  To minimize our losses we keep them housed dusk to dawn and
periodically one or more of our dogs hang out with them outside, but when we
let our guard down, or one sneaks into the woods to nest, we can have a
loss.
      Normally with a preditor involved, we lose only one at a time.
      The fact that you came home to a whole slaughter makes me wonder if a
pack or several or even a single dog could be the culprits.
      It seems to me that preditors take what they can eat or perhaps what
they can carry back to their young, but they don't do wholesale slaughter or
injuries.
    Could your rooster have broken his neck when he panicked and flew into
something?
     When I was young several times I remember having multiple killed and
injured ducks and it was always dogs involved.  One time a neighbor's dog
and one time two strays. (They also tried breaking into the rabbit houses
but failed.
      A friend who has geese, ducks and chickens says the same thing.  When
preditors take them, they totally disappear, except with a hawk hit you can
sometimes find the feathers or interrupt the attack.  Otherwise they
disappear without a trace.
        Dorothy

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