LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for FARMCOLLIE Archives


FARMCOLLIE Archives

FARMCOLLIE Archives


FARMCOLLIE@LIST.UVM.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

FARMCOLLIE Home

FARMCOLLIE Home

FARMCOLLIE  May 1997

FARMCOLLIE May 1997

Subject:

BC's & Aussies & colors

From:

[log in to unmask]

Reply-To:

Farm Collie Breed Conservancy and Restoration <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sat, 10 May 1997 04:22:40 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (65 lines)

A friend of mine has a half BC/half Aussie, a very nice dog that I helped her
start in herding.  I know that a lot of ranchers like this blend.  She got
this great dog out of a box of puppies being given away at a local grocery
store!   A couple of times I've had people call asking where they can find
this particular cross.

I believe the black in Border Collies is by and large the dominant black,
although it's possible there may be some of the recessive variety that is
known to occur in Shelties, GSD's, and which we know now still does occur,
although very rare, in Rough Collies.

Merle, being dominant over all colors (it's a pattern that affects the base
color, rather than being a color per se), requires a merle parent.  An
offspring of a merle that wasn't merle itself would have no merle gene to
give to any subsequent offspring, thus genetically there would be no
difference between a tricolor from two tricolor parents, and a tricolor from
one merle and one tricolor parent.

When flecks in white markings occur, they occur in the color that the leg,
muzzle or body would be if the white markings weren't there.  Thus, a black
dog will have black flecks, a black and tan dog will have black flecks where
the black would be and tan flecks where the tan would be on the legs or face
in the black-and-tan pattern (which, with white added, becomes tricolor).
 Apparently there were black-and-tan pattern Dalmatians at one time (there
still may be on a rare occasion, since black-and-tan is recessive to black
and thus can be hard to breed out entirely); these had black spots on the
body and tan spots on the legs and the sides of the muzzle, which were
faulted of course in the show ring.  The regular Dalmatian is simply a black
dog, the recessive liver dalmatian a liver dog (brown spots all over with a
brown nose).

Border Collies and Aussies, being essentially of the same working collie
background, share the same colors, except that sable has come to be faulted
in Aussies although I have heard of it still occurring on occasion, and I
have seen a couple of photos of saddle-pattern Aussies.  A merle
saddle-pattern would have the most noticeable merling in the saddle area, and
just as the saddle pattern ES and Collie have been called tricolor, the
saddle-pattern would probably be considered a merle -- just a merle with
extensive tan trim.  The tan areas would also have some merling, but the
contrast between dark tan and light tan isn't as noticeable as the contrast
between black and grey.

The color patterns in the Aussie X BC litter accords to what would occur in
an all-Aussie or all-BC litter, when breeding tricolors to black-and-whites.
 In this case (just speculation, but going by what's typical), the black is
probably the dominant black, carrying the black-and-tan pattern (tricolor)
recessive.  When bred to a tricolor, both black-and-white and tricolor
puppies would be likely.  I believe flecking (ticking) is generally a
dominant, so if one parent was noticeably flecked, many or most of the
puppies would be (how many would depend on whether the flecked parent carried
the recessive "no ticking" gene).  The extent of flecking is apparently
determined by modifiers that allow less, or more, ticking to be expressed.
 Ticking is fairly common in BC's, occurs to a certain extent in Shelties, is
less common but does occur in Aussies, and even less common, but again it
does occur, in Collies.  Although ticking, especially heavy ticking is
associated most often with gundogs, I have seen extensive ticking in such
diverse breeds as Akitas, fox terriers and St. Bernards.  "Blue" and "red"
heelers (Australian Cattle Dogs) are very heavily ticked dogs, the ticking so
heavy as to have an almost solid appearance.  Photos of earlier Cattle Dogs
show more of the white base -- something like the "belton" English Setter
color.

Linda R.
Pacifica, CA

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

March 2021
November 2020
October 2020
March 2019
January 2019
October 2018
March 2018
April 2017
December 2016
November 2016
July 2016
December 2015
August 2015
February 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
October 2013
September 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LIST.UVM.EDU

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager