within the collie world you know as well
> as I do that
> unfortunately you guys are the exceptions that prove
> the rule.

   Also the people that are breeding for the whole
dog, usually just don't breed that often.  Maybe 2
litters a year.  They stay small, they don't get their
dogs all over the place and make a "name" for
themselves in the dog world in a big way, like the
show breeders want to do.  Especially if they do
performance as well - you can only spend so much
money!  The National Specialty winners, the collies
you see in Westminster - I'd bet dollars to donuts
that none of them have normal eyes.  The publication
of the CCA (the Bulletin) I believe does not allow
breeders to advertise their dogs' eyechecks.
   My dog Pepper is the result her breeder's first
litter.  Pepper's mom and litter brother are her only
two intact dogs - she also has 5 or 6 performance/pet
dogs - one of which was supposed to be a breeding dog,
but went blind from PRA.  After that, she did a lot of
research to find a healthy, sound bitch and an equally
healthy, sound dog to breed her to.
   As far as normal-eyed dogs having incorrect eyes -
well, if the only way to get "correct" eyes is to
breed them small and affected with disease, maybe the
defination of "correct" needs to change, not the dogs!
 I think there is some truth to the Canadian judges'
tolerance of larger eyes - Pepper's mom and brother
both show better in Canada than in the US.
  There are normal eyed, even noncarrier Champions out
there - Spruce Meadows, Chelsea, Legendhold, McMaur,
Special Collies, Gold Hill.  All are show kennels with
normal-eyed dogs, some even noncarriers.

Jana



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