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January 2006

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Subject:
From:
Geoffrey Duke <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
Technology Discussion at UVM <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Tue, 17 Jan 2006 09:00:21 -0500
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[catching up on mail from last week]

Stef wrote:

> What I am speaking up about is the choice to tout gender
> as "the issue" and a CS degree as the only representation 
> that women are involved in the IT industry.

As I read the article, it brings up the /Unlocking the Clubhouse/ book
first, but then goes on to argue against the notions that males are somehow
more disposed to this arena of intellectual pursuit. A friend keeps
reminding me that it's environment, not genetics, but then, she's a
sociologist. :-) 

You raise an interesting point about the relationship between degrees and
actual work that people find themselves doing after graduation (one year,
five years, ten years). But looking at participation in CS degree programs
seems one way to quantify interest in CS across genders (or socio-economic
status or other attributes).

What about graduate degree programs? Do women represent a larger proportion
of grad students in CS than they do in undergraduate programs?

--
Geoff

Majors: Music Education, Lanscape Architecture
Degree: Human Development & Family Studies ( Psych minor )

Working (very slowly) toward MS CS.

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