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June 2018, Week 1

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"Jenkins, Jean" <[log in to unmask]>
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Jenkins, Jean
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Tue, 5 Jun 2018 16:54:24 +0000
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As usual, the collective librarian brain is very creative! Thanks to all of you who suggested possible search strategies/games to teach PubMed searching. Here is a summary of the responses.

Try dental materials stress - very interesting scope of results!


Here are some of my favorite PMIDs:

24333986

23945423

28424306



Also, if you're demonstrating MeSH terms/searching, you can look for "Candy" and/or "Chocolate" (and combine usage in search with "Heart Disease" or something).



I use Harry Potter[ ti] .  Hogwarts Headaches brings up a NEJM article. I use that article to illustrate the importance of talking to your patients and doing a good history and physical.  You can also combine  Harry Potter AND Vampires. Harry Potter AND recessive allele this gives you a Nature article which talks about using the characters in the books to teach genetics.  You can google it and see all the teaching plans that do just that.



Also fun are articles about famous authors like Edgar Allan Poe .


The power and pitfalls of literals:
"Tear film" is now an indexed phrase, though for a long time it was not.
Searching without the literals turns up a curious set of titles, many yes on the eye, but others:
Tears of wine: The dance of the droplets.
No tears in heaven: did the media create the pseudo-phenomenon "altitude-adjusted lachrymosity syndrome (AALS)"?<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov_pubmed_29632743&d=DwMFaQ&c=Rm3hRyxmymJgpBTCyRDm7Q&r=2f5UJxGS5c7kZckWa0_JTvAeG91gzVeMUKw1_tpkgb8&m=TdMBaOmFhnWTQFA1SOesKwYiV46MBvPUV80ePiYfenQ&s=U1I--v5G6_CQLZi9QB4sQCt05cg3JCdUQTvrgknGk-A&e=>
Case-control study on polymer polylactic acid absorbable medical film for preventing acromion adhesion after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair].<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov_pubmed_29600672&d=DwMFaQ&c=Rm3hRyxmymJgpBTCyRDm7Q&r=2f5UJxGS5c7kZckWa0_JTvAeG91gzVeMUKw1_tpkgb8&m=TdMBaOmFhnWTQFA1SOesKwYiV46MBvPUV80ePiYfenQ&s=F6UxWBbbaoHO0xUpPh7Nyp0ppRgigxD636MMV6UV09Y&e=>
Social Effects of Tears and Small Pupils Are Mediated by Felt Sadness: An Evolutionary View.
Mathematical modelling of glob-driven tear film breakup.<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov_pubmed_29390061&d=DwMFaQ&c=Rm3hRyxmymJgpBTCyRDm7Q&r=2f5UJxGS5c7kZckWa0_JTvAeG91gzVeMUKw1_tpkgb8&m=TdMBaOmFhnWTQFA1SOesKwYiV46MBvPUV80ePiYfenQ&s=Z6XbI_tVPNt5mvBLkh8waxC5FEhfSfarISGXFniDEMI&e=>
And even "tear film" can be fun:
Structure and microanalysis of tear film ferning of camel tears, human tears, and Refresh Plus.

Not sure if this would work for your residents (I usually use it with groups who are brand-new to PubMed), but it can be fun to search for celebrity-themed articles -- e.g.
Which of these individuals has the most mentions in PubMed?
John Travolta
Meryl Streep
Captain Kirk
Marilyn Monroe
(when I last ran the searches in January 2018, it was Marilyn Monroe).


I do one with nursing students searching CINAHL and use "wound care" as an example.  That topic is not very exciting, but it does produce an article on caring for zombies. I just briefly search PubMed and see that there are some articles on zombies or Solanum infection.  It's kind of fun to show them that scholarship doesn't always have to be serious. :)

I also use the search term buffalo :  results are the animal, the city, an author, and a journal (Buffalo Law Review).



A list of interesting articles:

1: Kruvand M, Bryant FB. Zombie Apocalypse: Can the Undead Teach the Living How

to Survive an Emergency? Public Health Rep. 2015 Nov-Dec;130(6):655-63. PubMed

PMID: 26556937; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4612174.



2: Tatla SK, Radomski A, Cheung J, Maron M, Jarus T. Wii-habilitation as balance

therapy for children with acquired brain injury. Dev Neurorehabil. 2014

Feb;17(1):1-15. doi: 10.3109/17518423.2012.740508. Epub 2012 Dec 11. PubMed PMID:

23231377.



3: Hopkinson JA, Hopkinson NS. The hobbit - an unexpected deficiency. Med J Aust.

2013 Dec 16;199(11):805-6. PubMed PMID: 24329673.



4: Nguyen V, Cooper L, Lowndes J, Melanson K, Angelopoulos TJ, Rippe JM, Reimers

K. Popcorn is more satiating than potato chips in normal-weight adults. Nutr J.

2012 Sep 14;11:71. doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-11-71. PubMed PMID: 22978828; PubMed

Central PMCID: PMC3502142.



5: Sparks DA, Coughlin LM, Chase DM. Did too much Wii cause your patient's

injury? J Fam Pract. 2011 Jul;60(7):404-9. Review. PubMed PMID: 21731918.



6: Ward M. Caring for manikins. Anaesthesia. 2007 May;62(5):538. PubMed PMID:

17448087.



7: Dawson P, Han I, Cox M, Black C, Simmons L. Residence time and food contact

time effects on transfer of Salmonella Typhimurium from tile, wood and carpet:

testing the five-second rule. J Appl Microbiol. 2007 Apr;102(4):945-53. PubMed

PMID: 17381737.



8: Smith GC, Pell JP. Parachute use to prevent death and major trauma related to

gravitational challenge: systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Int J

Prosthodont. 2006 Mar-Apr;19(2):126-8. PubMed PMID: 16602356.



9: Gromb S, Lavigne X, Kerautret G, Grosleron-Gros N, Dabadie P. Spontaneous

human combustion: a sometimes incomprehensible phenomenon. J Clin Forensic Med.

2000 Mar;7(1):29-31. PubMed PMID: 16083646.



10: Benedito J, Carcel JA, Sanjuan N, Mulet A. Use of ultrasound to assess

Cheddar cheese characteristics. Ultrasonics. 2000 Mar;38(1-8):727-30. PubMed

PMID: 10829761.



11: Sun T, Warrington NM, Rubin JB. Why does Jack, and not Jill, break his crown?

Sex disparity in brain tumors. Biol Sex Differ. 2012 Jan 25;3:3. doi:

10.1186/2042-6410-3-3. PubMed PMID: 22277186; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3293746.



Nursing maps to both Nursing[Mesh] and Breastfeeding[Mesh].



There are a number of articles with the phrase "Beam me up, Scotty."



If you're a Star Trek: TNG fan, you can search on the terms  BORG and ASSIMILATION to retrieve an article that has nothing to do with SciFi.



Disco felon.<https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/449972>

Walker FW, Lillemoe KD, Farquharson RR.

N Engl J Med. 1979 Jul 19;301(3):166-7. No abstract available.
PMID: 449972
In the category of youthful behavior causing health problem.
Patient figured injury due to continuously snapping her fingers while disco dancing.


Shea SE, Gordon K, Hawkins A, Kawchuk J, Smith D. Pathology in the Hundred Acre Wood: a neurodevelopmental perspective on A.A. Milne. CMAJ. 2000 Dec 12; 163(12):1557-9. PMID: 11153486.  https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov_pmc_articles_PMC80580_pdf_20001212s00009p1557.pdf&d=DwIGaQ&c=Rm3hRyxmymJgpBTCyRDm7Q&r=2f5UJxGS5c7kZckWa0_JTvAeG91gzVeMUKw1_tpkgb8&m=iVdT79T7TZZRNsU2RJCOREzu26nX2ao0RE001uNee3s&s=TBwoyQFM7hEB7YyFVl0zDjGGDSDNu3EVq48Bog3qu8c&e

The NNLM Training Office created a game to promote the MeSH terms added in 2017 called "Band Name or MeSH Term".  https://news.nnlm.gov/nto/2016/11/07/band-nameor-mesh-term-a-game-based-on-the-2017-medical-subject-headings/

I used to start my library orientation with this game.  I would get the new employees on Friday afternoon after a weeklong orientation, so this at least kept their interest and was a nice way to introduce them to advanced searching.



I've used Harry Potter references in the past as interesting PubMed search examples.  There are citations that show an increase in headaches in children after the latest book had come out (from reading too long).  There is also a citation about pediatric ER visits going down after the books were released.

Another fun PubMed search is for citations about Agatha Christie.  She trained to become a pharmacy technician so there are some articles that discuss how her training influenced her mystery novels.

Finally, an interesting search from the art world is to look up Vincent Van Gogh and digitalis toxicity.  There is some literature that discusses whether his use of digitalis might have contributed to using the color yellow in many of his paintings.



One example that I use while teaching is if someone searches the single word CIRRHOSIS, it maps to fibrosis as a mesh term. In case they expect it to map to liver cirrhosis, then they are mistaken.

Another example I give is that if you search for Asthma and COPD, while you may get relevant results you also get some like this:

Small airways diseases, *excluding* asthma and COPD: an overview.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23728867

PMID: 23728867



When I teach the difference between ATM and Field tags (Single Citation Matcher) and MeSH, I usually use the example with Blood.

This is good because you can find an author named Blood, you can find a journal titled Blood and you can look for Blood in Title/Abstract.

There is one article where one of the authors is Blood and is using Blood in [tiab] in the journal Blood.

So they can understand how Pubmed translate their query when they use it like Google and the big difference when they use Mesh terms.



And there are bloody author institutional affiliations as well--well, blood, not bloody, as the search term.



Thanks again!

Jean


[Ascension]

Jean Jenkins
Medical Librarian/CME Coordinator
Our Lady of Lourdes Memorial Hospital
169 Riverside Drive
Binghamton, NY 13905
607-798-5290



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