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COMMUNET Home

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COMMUNET  October 2000, Week 5

COMMUNET October 2000, Week 5

Subject:

"Future of America in the Balance: Seriously Diminished Expectations"

From:

Curtiss Priest <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Community and Civic Network discussion list <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 31 Oct 2000 21:24:12 EST

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (474 lines)

**
                W. Curtiss Priest, Ph.D.
          Center for Information, Technology & Society
           466 Pleasant Street Melrose, MA  02176
   E-mail: [log in to unmask], Voice: 781-662-4044, FAX: 781-662-6882

           This document may be distributed freely

                October 31, 2000

                An Open Discussion
           with Government, Foundations, Non-profits
                 and Grassroots Efforts

                 Public Issue #70:

               CITS LEADERSHIP WATCH

           "Future of America in the Balance:

            Seriously Diminished Expectations"

                  ***************

         Commentary by Dr. W. Curtiss Priest, Director:

    For some thirty years I have searched for "leadership"
in government.

    I was too young to know, first hand, if J.F.K. was a leader.
History suggests, however, that there have been true leaders including
Presidents such as Washington, John Adams, Jefferson, Madison
Lincoln, Grant, T. Roosevelt, F. Roosevelt, Eisenhower, and Kennedy.
Your list may differ.

    But throughout my adult life I have been waiting for a
presidential leader ... only to continue waiting.

    I am not certain that Gore is a leader, but I do know
for certain that Bush is not.

    For the U.S. Congress (OTA) I was permitted the time to
study Gore's record in the Senate, especially as it related
to fostering education.  Gore and his staff did champion various
initiatives including the formation of the National Clearinghouse
on Educational Software.

    And, when Gore was elected Vice-President, I listened
eagerly to his first National Press Club speech about the role
of government in aiding education and fostering the Internet.

    But this brief "euphoria" dissipated when the next Internet-
related event was held at UCLA and folk such as Eisner of
Disney were in the center.

    Gore had now embraced the centralist position of the
Democratic Party under a President that made reasonable choices
under the ever growing trend towards permitting capitalistic
pursuits 'solve' our nation's problems.  The First Lady's
hope that a new era for health care would be their legacy
were quickly dashed in the first year of Clinton's terms.

***

    Sometimes when I feel there is something wrong with the
world, but cannot bring it to consciousness, James Carroll
will write a piece that crystallizes my hidden emotion.

    Carroll did this for me this morning, and his insightful
essay appears below.  I also enclose a copy of the
gaffes quoted from Bush that have recently traversed the
Internet from source unknown.  Some have referred to these
as malapropisms but I believe that label is much too kind.  And,
below too, a parody of one of the debates.

    Carroll says that not only is a vote for Bush a vote
against presidential leadership, but, worse, it represents
a vote for our own immaturity.

    We read in today's news that the Great Coral Reef is being
threatened by global warming and breaks in the ozone layer.
And I am willing to bet that most Americans see global warming
as a way to have a warmer climate without having to bother to
move.  The 'American way' about such problems is typically
to let them become a crisis, and then leap to some rescue.
We saw that with automobile safety in the '60's and '70's.

    Unfortunately, the effects of global warming, world
population growth, and the globalization of cultures are issues
of such magnitude that the opportunity to "fix the results"
may never come.

    We have met the enemy and they are us.

**********************************************************************
NOTICE: Contains copyrighted material, do not redistribute unless you
abide to the copyright notice appearing at the end of this article.

As provided for under Section 107 of the 1976 Copyright Law, the
following piece is being distributed for non-profit purposes and for
comment, criticism, and teaching.  In cases where the purpose of
conveying information is to fully inform the reader, an entire entry
or article is reproduced.  However, these extracts are typically a
very small percentage of the overall original work or publication.

Should you wish to convey this material, in the same spirit, you are
free to do so.

****************************Advertisement*****************************
Subscriptions to the Boston Globe are available at 617-929-2000 Boston
Globe archives are available for a fee at www.bostonglobe.com
****************************Advertisement*****************************

The 21st century know-nothing

By James Carroll, 10/31/2000

AN EDITORIAL PAGE cartoon by Walt Handelsman has George W. Bush coming
out of the voting booth, exclaiming, "A vote for Nader is a vote for
Bush ... so I voted for Nader."

Jokes about the dimwittedness of George W. Bush have become so much a
staple of the political season that he cracks them himself. At the Al
Smith dinner in New York last week Bush referred to his fellow Yale
alumnus William F. Buckley and drew a contrast: "Bill wrote a book at
Yale," Bush said. "I read one."

Self-deprecation like that has its appeal and can be a way of
connecting with ordinary voters. But one can't shake the feeling that
something else is going on here. Take, for example, the issue that
Bush identifies as his top priority - education reform. He promises
that, if elected, his "education improvement package" will be the
first legislation he sends to Congress. Concerning schools, he
complains about what he calls the sly bigotry of diminished
expectations.

But the real questions are whether George W. Bush's own candidacy is a
manifestation of a nation's seriously diminished expectations for
itself, and whether Bush, to advance his prospects, has played a part
in that diminishment? It is not that his intellectual mediocrity sets
him so far apart from other political leaders. We expect our geniuses
to be the president's advisers, not the president. What makes the Bush
campaign unusual is the way it claims the candidate's ignorance as an
asset.

Implicit in running gags of late-night comedians is the fact that
where Dan Quayle was shamed by what he did not know, Bush is qualified
by it. His thin grasp of basic knowledge necessary to world leadership
is presented as part of his charm, and his proven inability to move
below the surface of any question is passed off as essential to what
makes him likeable. Thus, he derides his opponent's budget proposals,
but only by denouncing them fuzzily as "fuzzy math." He dismisses
the crucial business of acute political argument as partisan
bickering, and offers mere assertion - "I'll get it done" - in place
of rational plans of action. Oddly, he is an establishment act of
revenge against the feely-deely anti-intellectualism of the long-gone
counter-culture, co-opting its emotive style while faking its heart.

Indeed, much about George W. Bush is palpably fake. He is a
Connecticut Yankee posing as a Texas good old boy; a tribune of
privilege pretending to be a populist; a moral opportunist in the
clothing of an ethical absolutist; a careless executioner who claims
to be compassionate; and, most tellingly, a self-anointed education
advocate who has not only disdained education in his own life, but
brags about having done so.

His attitude, recognizable as the blase smugness of a willful
underachiever, conveys bushels more to students about "educational
improvement" than any "package" his aides might concoct ever will.
The question, however, is not about Bush, but about the electorate.
Why does such acknowledged superficiality have wide appeal? What will
it say of this nation if we elect this 21st century know-nothing as
president?

To paraphrase the cartoonist's punchline, I believe that a vote for
Bush is a vote against the world we find ourselves living in now. It
isn't that Americans are fooled by his shrugging amiability, but that
many see in his absence of gravitas a way to flee the grave challenges
of the new era. So sure, pull the peacekeepers back. Sure, build a
missile defense. Sure, hand Social Security funds over to stock
brokers. Sure, kill criminals. And as for hostile weapons sites - take
'em out.

A vote for Bush is a vote against complexity; a vote against
multilateral partnerships with other nations; a vote against the
independent moral integrity of women; a vote against the idea of
social structures evolving toward justice; a vote against the habits
of mind that characterize literacy.

Whether the subject is the future of the economy or the plight of the
impoverished or the real needs of schools or the threat of nuclear
catastrophe, a vote for Bush is a vote against adult responsibility
for things as they are.

George W. Bush's most winning characteristic is his anarchic
boyishness. That says it all. A vote for Bush is a vote not for his
immaturity, but for ours.

James Carroll'scolumn appears regularly in the Globe.

This story ran on page A19 of the Boston Globe on 10/31/2000.  +
Copyright 2000 Globe Newspaper Company.

*******************************************************************
Bush quotations:

"If we don't succeed, we run the risk of failure." ...George W. Bush,
Jr.

"Republicans understand the importance of bondage between a mother and
child." ...Governor George W. Bush, Jr.

"Welcome to Mrs. Bush, and my fellow astronauts." ...Governor George
W. Bush, Jr.

"Mars is essentially in the same orbit...Mars is somewhat the same
distance from the Sun, which is very important. We have seen pictures
where there are canals, we believe, and water. If there is water, that
means there is oxygen.  If oxygen, that means we can breathe."
...Governor George W. Bush, Jr., 8/11/94

"The Holocaust was an obscene period in our nation's history.  I mean
in this century's history. But we all lived in this century.  I didn't
live in this century." ...Governor George W. Bush, Jr., 9/15/95

"I believe we are on an irreversible trend toward more freedom and
democracy - but that could change." ...Governor George W. Bush, Jr.,
5/22/98

"One word sums up probably the responsibility of any Governor, and
that one word is 'to be prepared'." ...Governor George W. Bush, Jr.,
12/6/93

"Verbosity leads to unclear, inarticulate things." ...Governor George
W. Bush, Jr., 11/30/96

"I have made good judgments in the past.  I have made good judgments
in the future." ...Governor George W. Bush, Jr.

"The future will be better tomorrow." ...Governor George W. Bush, Jr.

"We're going to have the best educated American people in the world."
...Governor George W. Bush, Jr., 9/21/97

"People that are really very weird can get into sensitive positions
and have a tremendous impact on history." ...Governor George W. Bush,
Jr.

"I stand by all the misstatements that I've made." ...Governor George
W. Bush, Jr. to Sam Donaldson, 8/17/93

"We have a firm commitment to NATO, we are a part of NATO. We have a
firm commitment to Europe. We are a part of Europe." ...Governor
George W. Bush, Jr.

"Public speaking is very easy." ...Governor George W. Bush, Jr. to
reporters in 10/9

"I am not part of the problem. I am a Republican" ...Governor George
W. Bush, Jr.

"A low voter turnout is an indication of fewer people going to the
polls." ...Governor George W. Bush, Jr.

"When I have been asked who caused the riots and the killing in LA, my
answer has been direct & simple: Who is to blame for the riots? The
rioters are to blame. Who is to blame for the killings? The killers
are to blame. ...George W. Bush, Jr.

"Illegitimacy is something we should talk about in terms of not having
it." ...Governor George W. Bush, Jr., 5/20/96

"We are ready for any unforeseen event that may or may not occur."
...Governor George W. Bush, Jr., 9/22/97

"For NASA, space is still a high priority." ...Governor George W.
Bush, Jr., 9/5/93

"Quite frankly, teachers are the only profession that teach our
children." ...Governor George W. Bush, Jr., 9/18/95

"The American people would not want to know of any misquotes that

George Bush may or may not make." ...Governor George W. Bush, Jr.

"We're all capable of mistakes, but I do not care to enlighten you on
the mistakes we may or may not have made." ...Governor George W. Bush,
Jr.

"It isn't pollution that's harming the environment.  It's the
impurities in our air and water that are doing it." ...Governor George
W. Bush, Jr.

"[It's] time for the human race to enter the solar system."
...Governor George W. Bush, Jr.

*******************************************************************

Debate parody:

For those of you who missed the debates, look no further.

Jim Lehrer: Welcome to the second presidential debate between Vice
President Al Gore and Gov. George W. Bush.

The candidates have agreed on these rules: I will ask a question. The
candidate will ignore the question and deliver rehearsed remarks designed
to appeal to undecided women voters.

The opponent will then have one minute to respond by trying to frighten
senior citizens into voting for him.

When a speaker's time has expired, I will whimper softly while he
continues to spew incomprehensible statistics for three more minutes.

Let's start with the vice president. Mr. Gore, can you give us the name
of a downtrodden citizen and then tell us his or her story in a way that
strains the bounds of common sense?

Gore: As I was saying to Tipper last night after we tenderly made love
the way we have so often during the 30 years of our rock-solid marriage,
the
downtrodden have a clear choice in this election.

My opponent wants to cut taxes for the richest 1 percent of Americans. I,
on the other hand, want to put the richest 1 percent in an ironclad
lockbox so they can't hurt old people like Roberta Frampinhamper, who is
here tonight.

Mrs. Frampinhamper has been selling her internal organs, one by one, to
pay for gas so that she can travel to these debates and personify
problems for me. Also, her poodle has arthritis.

Lehrer: Gov. Bush, your rebuttal.

Bush: Governors are on the front lines every day, hugging people, crying
with them, relieving suffering anywhere a photo opportunity exists.

I want to empower those crying people to make their own decisions, unlike
my opponent, whose mother is not Barbara Bush.

Lehrer: Let's turn to foreign affairs. Gov. Bush, if Slobodan Milosevic
were to launch a bid to return to power in Yugoslavia, would you be able
to pronounce his name?

Bush: The current administration had eight years to deal with that guy
and didn't get it done.

If I'm elected, the first thing I would do about that guy is have Dick
Cheney confer with our allies. And then Dick would present me several
options for dealing with that guy. And then Dick would tell me which one
to choose.

You know, as governor of Texas, I have to make tough foreign policy
decisions every day about how we're going to deal with New Mexico.

Lehrer: Mr. Gore, your rebuttal.

Gore: Foreign policy is something I've always been keenly interested in.

I served my country in Vietnam. I had an uncle who was a victim of poison
gas in World War I. I myself lost a leg in the Franco-Prussian War. And
when that war was over, I came home and tenderly made love to Tipper in a
way that any undecided woman voter would find romantic.

If I'm entrusted with the office of president, I pledge to deal
knowledgeably with any threat, foreign or domestic, by putting it in an
ironclad lockbox. Because the American people deserve a president who can
comfort them with simple metaphors.

Lehrer: Vice President Gore, how would you reform the Social Security
system?

Gore: It's a vital issue, Jim. That's why Joe Lieberman and I have
proposed changing the laws of mathematics to allow us to give $50,000 to
every senior citizen without having it cost the federal treasury a single
penny until the year 2250.

In addition, my budget commits $60 trillion over the next 10 years to
guarantee that all senior citizens can have drugs delivered free to their
homes every Monday by a federal employee who will also help them with the
child-proof cap.

Lehrer: Gov. Bush?

Bush: That's fuzzy math. I know, because as governor of Texas, I have to
do math every day. I have to add up the numbers and decide whether I'm
going to fill potholes out on Rt. 36 east of Abilene or commit funds to
reroof the sheep barn at the Texas state fairgrounds.

Lehrer: It's time for closing statements.

Gore: I'm my own man. I may not be the most exciting politician, but I
will fight for the working families of America, in addition to turning
the White House into a lusty pit of marital love for Tipper and me.

Bush: It's time to put aside the partisanship of the past by electing no
one but Republicans.

Lehrer: Good night.

**********************************************************************
Copyright Notice:  This article is protected under copyright law. The
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the protection of fair use.

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Also, the courts generally interpret copyright protection by economic
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language, as we use, is provided to indicate the "fair use" aspect of
its dissemination and storage.

********************************************************************

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January 2000, Week 2
January 2000, Week 1
December 1999, Week 5
December 1999, Week 4
December 1999, Week 3
December 1999, Week 2
December 1999, Week 1
November 1999, Week 5
November 1999, Week 4
November 1999, Week 3
November 1999, Week 2
November 1999, Week 1
October 1999, Week 5
October 1999, Week 4
October 1999, Week 3
October 1999, Week 2
October 1999, Week 1
September 1999, Week 5
September 1999, Week 4
September 1999, Week 3
September 1999, Week 2
September 1999, Week 1
August 1999, Week 5
August 1999, Week 4
August 1999, Week 3
August 1999, Week 2
August 1999, Week 1
July 1999, Week 5
July 1999, Week 4
July 1999, Week 3
July 1999, Week 2
July 1999, Week 1
June 1999, Week 5
June 1999, Week 4
June 1999, Week 3
June 1999, Week 2
June 1999, Week 1
May 1999, Week 4
May 1999, Week 3
May 1999, Week 2
May 1999, Week 1
April 1999, Week 5
April 1999, Week 4
April 1999, Week 3
April 1999, Week 2
April 1999, Week 1
March 1999, Week 5
March 1999, Week 4
March 1999, Week 3
March 1999, Week 2
March 1999, Week 1
February 1999, Week 4
February 1999, Week 3
February 1999, Week 2
February 1999, Week 1
January 1999, Week 5
January 1999, Week 4
January 1999, Week 3
January 1999, Week 2
January 1999, Week 1
December 1998, Week 4
December 1998, Week 3
December 1998, Week 2
December 1998, Week 1
November 1998, Week 5
November 1998, Week 4
November 1998, Week 3
November 1998, Week 2
November 1998, Week 1
October 1998, Week 5
October 1998, Week 4
October 1998, Week 3
October 1998, Week 2
October 1998, Week 1
September 1998, Week 5
September 1998, Week 4
September 1998, Week 3
September 1998, Week 2
September 1998, Week 1
August 1998, Week 5
August 1998, Week 4
August 1998, Week 3
August 1998, Week 2
August 1998, Week 1
July 1998, Week 5
July 1998, Week 4
July 1998, Week 3
July 1998, Week 2
July 1998, Week 1
June 1998, Week 5
June 1998, Week 4
June 1998, Week 3
June 1998, Week 2
June 1998, Week 1
May 1998, Week 5
May 1998, Week 4
May 1998, Week 3
May 1998, Week 2
May 1998, Week 1
April 1998, Week 5
April 1998, Week 4
April 1998, Week 3
April 1998, Week 2
April 1998, Week 1
March 1998, Week 5
March 1998, Week 4
March 1998, Week 3
March 1998, Week 2
March 1998, Week 1
February 1998, Week 4
February 1998, Week 3
February 1998, Week 2
February 1998, Week 1
January 1998, Week 5
January 1998, Week 4
January 1998, Week 3
January 1998, Week 2
January 1998, Week 1
December 1997, Week 5
December 1997, Week 4
December 1997, Week 3
December 1997, Week 2
December 1997, Week 1
November 1997, Week 5
November 1997, Week 4
November 1997, Week 3
November 1997, Week 2
November 1997, Week 1
October 1997, Week 5
October 1997, Week 4
October 1997, Week 3
October 1997, Week 2
October 1997, Week 1
September 1997, Week 5
September 1997, Week 4
September 1997, Week 3
September 1997, Week 2
September 1997, Week 1
August 1997, Week 5
August 1997, Week 4
August 1997, Week 3
August 1997, Week 2
August 1997, Week 1
July 1997, Week 5
July 1997, Week 4
July 1997, Week 3
July 1997, Week 2
July 1997, Week 1
June 1997, Week 5
June 1997, Week 4
June 1997, Week 3
June 1997, Week 2
June 1997, Week 1
May 1997, Week 5
May 1997, Week 4
May 1997, Week 3
May 1997, Week 2
May 1997, Week 1
April 1997, Week 5
April 1997, Week 4
April 1997, Week 3
April 1997, Week 2
April 1997, Week 1
March 1997, Week 6
March 1997, Week 5
March 1997, Week 4
March 1997, Week 3
March 1997, Week 2
March 1997, Week 1
February 1997, Week 5
February 1997, Week 4
February 1997, Week 3
February 1997, Week 2
February 1997, Week 1
January 1997, Week 5
January 1997, Week 4
January 1997, Week 3
January 1997, Week 2
January 1997, Week 1
December 1996, Week 4
December 1996, Week 3
December 1996, Week 2
December 1996, Week 1
November 1996, Week 5
November 1996, Week 4
November 1996, Week 3
November 1996, Week 2
November 1996, Week 1
October 1996, Week 5
October 1996, Week 4
October 1996, Week 3
October 1996, Week 2
October 1996, Week 1
September 1996, Week 5
September 1996, Week 4
September 1996, Week 3
September 1996, Week 2
September 1996, Week 1
August 1996, Week 5
August 1996, Week 4
August 1996, Week 3
August 1996, Week 2
August 1996, Week 1
July 1996, Week 5
July 1996, Week 4
July 1996, Week 3
July 1996, Week 2
July 1996, Week 1
June 1996, Week 5
June 1996, Week 4
June 1996, Week 3
June 1996, Week 2
June 1996, Week 1
May 1996, Week 5
May 1996, Week 4
May 1996, Week 3
May 1996, Week 2
May 1996, Week 1
April 1996, Week 5
April 1996, Week 4
April 1996, Week 3
April 1996, Week 2
April 1996, Week 1
March 1996, Week 6
March 1996, Week 5
March 1996, Week 4
March 1996, Week 3
March 1996, Week 2
March 1996, Week 1
February 1996, Week 5
February 1996, Week 4
February 1996, Week 3
February 1996, Week 2
February 1996, Week 1
January 1996, Week 5
January 1996, Week 4
January 1996, Week 3
January 1996, Week 2
January 1996, Week 1
December 1995, Week 6
December 1995, Week 5
December 1995, Week 4
December 1995, Week 3
December 1995, Week 2
December 1995, Week 1
November 1995, Week 5
November 1995, Week 4
November 1995, Week 3
November 1995, Week 2
November 1995, Week 1
October 1995, Week 5
October 1995, Week 4
October 1995, Week 3
October 1995, Week 2
October 1995, Week 1
October 1995, Week -15
September 1995, Week 5
September 1995, Week 4
September 1995, Week 3
September 1995, Week 2
September 1995, Week 1
August 1995, Week 5
August 1995, Week 4
August 1995, Week 3
August 1995, Week 2
August 1995, Week 1
July 1995, Week 5
July 1995, Week 4
July 1995, Week 3
July 1995, Week 2
July 1995, Week 1
June 1995, Week 5
June 1995, Week 4
June 1995, Week 3
June 1995, Week 2
June 1995, Week 1
May 1995, Week 5
May 1995, Week 4
May 1995, Week 3
May 1995, Week 2
May 1995, Week 1
April 1995, Week 5
April 1995, Week 4
April 1995, Week 3
April 1995, Week 2
April 1995, Week 1
March 1995, Week 5
March 1995, Week 4
March 1995, Week 3
March 1995, Week 2
March 1995, Week 1
February 1995, Week 4
February 1995, Week 3
February 1995, Week 2
February 1995, Week 1
January 1995, Week 5
January 1995, Week 4
January 1995, Week 3
January 1995, Week 2
January 1995, Week 1
December 1994, Week 5
December 1994, Week 4
December 1994, Week 3
December 1994, Week 2
December 1994, Week 1
November 1994, Week 5
November 1994, Week 4
November 1994, Week 3
November 1994, Week 2
November 1994, Week 1
October 1994, Week 5
October 1994, Week 4
October 1994, Week 3
October 1994, Week 2
October 1994, Week 1
September 1994, Week 5
September 1994, Week 4
September 1994, Week 3
September 1994, Week 2
September 1994, Week 1
August 1994, Week 5
August 1994, Week 4
August 1994, Week 3
August 1994, Week 2
August 1994, Week 1
July 1994, Week 5
July 1994, Week 4
July 1994, Week 3
July 1994, Week 2
July 1994, Week 1
June 1994, Week 5
June 1994, Week 4
June 1994, Week 3
June 1994, Week 2
June 1994, Week 1
May 1994, Week 5
May 1994, Week 4
May 1994, Week 3
May 1994, Week 2
May 1994, Week 1
April 1994, Week 5
April 1994, Week 4
April 1994, Week 3
April 1994, Week 2
April 1994, Week 1
March 1994, Week 5
March 1994, Week 4
March 1994, Week 3
March 1994, Week 2
March 1994, Week 1
February 1994, Week 4
February 1994, Week 3
February 1994, Week 2
February 1994, Week 1
January 1994, Week 5
January 1994, Week 4
January 1994, Week 3
January 1994, Week 2
January 1994, Week 1
December 1993, Week 5
December 1993, Week 4
December 1993, Week 3
December 1993, Week 2
December 1993, Week 1
November 1993, Week 5
November 1993, Week 4
November 1993, Week 3
November 1993, Week 2
November 1993, Week 1
October 1993, Week 5
October 1993, Week 4
October 1993, Week 3
October 1993, Week 2
October 1993, Week 1
September 1993, Week 5
September 1993, Week 4
September 1993, Week 3
September 1993, Week 2
September 1993, Week 1
August 1993, Week 5
August 1993, Week 4
August 1993, Week 3
August 1993, Week 2
August 1993, Week 1
July 1993, Week 5
July 1993, Week 4
July 1993, Week 3
July 1993, Week 2
July 1993, Week 1
June 1993, Week 5
June 1993, Week 4
June 1993, Week 3
June 1993, Week 2
June 1993, Week 1
May 1993, Week 5
May 1993, Week 4
May 1993, Week 3
May 1993, Week 2
May 1993, Week 1
April 1993, Week 5
April 1993, Week 4
April 1993, Week 3
April 1993, Week 2
April 1993, Week 1
March 1993, Week 5
March 1993, Week 4
March 1993
February 1993

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