LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for VTLEPS Archives


VTLEPS Archives

VTLEPS Archives


VTLEPS@LIST.UVM.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

VTLEPS Home

VTLEPS Home

VTLEPS  July 2002

VTLEPS July 2002

Subject:

Re: COLLECTING TRIP TO VERMONT

From:

"Grkovich, Alex" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Vermont Butterfly Survey <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 5 Jul 2002 07:48:17 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (129 lines)

        My wife Ljiljana and I made a trip to Vermont this past weekend. The
plan was to travel up from the Boston area on Friday, stay at White River
Junction, VT (on the Connecticut River along I-89, across the river from
Lebanon, NH), then hike up Killington on Saturday. We would finally stop in
Amherst, MA to visit our younger son at U-Mass Amherst on our way home late
Saturday.

        Weather forecast was for partly cloudy skies, temperatures in the
lower 80's, and high pressure to dominate.

        Just a quick note on Killington. What is known as "Killington" is
actually a dominant and relatively high mountain range (for the northeast)
located in the middle area of the Green Mountain ranges of the state. The
Killington range is 15 miles east of the town of Rutland, and approximately
40 miles west of White River Junction, where of course, we spent the night.
The range includes five (5) major peaks which exceed 3,000 feet in
elevation. An extensive downhill ski area has been developed on the north
faces of the range. The major peaks are as follows (moving west): Bear
Mountain 3295 ft, Skye Peak 3800 ft, Killington Peak 4241 ft, Snowdon Mtn.
3592 ft, Rams Head Mtn 3610, and Pico Peak 3850 ft. The lowlands in the
valleys below are typical upper Transition Zone forested areas, and as you
ascend toward the base plateau of Killington, you move into typical Canadian
Zone areas. The summits are generally wooded, but with wind-stunted trees
and meadows; there is a small area of  Hudsonian Zone vegetation at the
summit of Killington Peak. We had planned to hike Skye Peak, which we have
hiked several times over the past few years.

        After continental breakfast at the hotel we started west along Rt. 4
for Killington. We passed through the beautiful town of Woodstock at about
8:30AM, and stopped at a garden shop at the west side of town. In a
streamside field near the center, I encountered a few Indian Skippers,
Inornate Ringlets, and also collected a female Crescent, which may prove to
be a Northern (cocyta). The flight was gliding, rapid, but not long between
stops on her foodplant (asters).

        We continued along Rt. 4 toward Killington after 9AM. The
temperature was steadily climbing through the lower 70's; after about 9:15AM
the White Admirals began to appear in good numbers, patrolling and perching
along the road. Roadkills were frequent. I picked one roadkill up: a perfect
male specimen with well-developed reddish ground color below (as compared to
the bluish ground color on the specimens I encountered near Lewiston, Maine
the week earlier).

        We reached the Killington Ski Area parking area a short while later.
The elevation here is approximately 2400 feet; thus the vertical distance to
the summit of Skye Peak is approx. 1400 feet. The temperature here was 71F,
partly cloudy skies, fairly humid. We ascended along the main ski trail.
Arctic Skippers were seen everywhere, especially in the grassy swales. They
were encountered from the base to the summit. Canadian Tiger Swalowtails
were also commonly seen patrolling and nectaring everywhere at clovers. A
female specimen was collcetd at the summit. Hobomok Skippers, including
female "pocahontas", were seen particularly on the lower half of the
mountain. On the upper half, Silvery Blues were abundant. These were
especially interesting as the ground color below is very dark gray, and the
dark spots are somewhat reduced, but not absent, always present. They
exhibited the characteristic flight of the species: rapid, flickering,
straight ahead at approx. 0.5 meters above the surface. We observed at least
one pair in mating ritual. I looked hard for the northern Blues (Saepilous
and idas, but neither were, of course, present- all were Silverys
[lygdamus]). Also seen were Clouded Sulphurs, Orange Sulphurs, and (near the
summit) Red Admirals.

        At approx. 300 feet below the summit, the climate changed
drastically; the temperature dropped substantially, and the wind picked up.
It also became quite overcast with rapidly moving mid-level cloud cover. The
black flies were present in abundance; at the summit the trees are stunted,
small and damp alpine meadows occur; dominated by mosses and lichens, quite
wet. At the summit, two Milbert's Tortoiseshells were encountered (I did not
try too hard to get a voucher, and I regret it as I am curious as toiextent
of the orange in the banding above, i.e. were the bands full orange), and a
freshly emerged Atlantis Fritillary. Another Canadian Tiger Swallowtail and
again, numerous Silvery Blues.

        We  started down after a brief snack at the summit, along with a
long look around (breathtaking views), descending along the dirt and gravel
access road network (also used by mountain bikers). More Atlantis
Fritillaries, Dreamy Duskywing, Arctic Skippers, Orange and Clouded Sulphurs
(no white females) were seen along with Canadian Tiger Swallowtails. I saw
no White Admirals anywhere on the mountain or on the higher base plateau
(only in the lowlands, a bit surprising). A female Black Swallowtail was
seen, presumably in ovipositing mood, on Queen Anne's Lace at el. 2800 feet.


        The lowlight of the day was my missing an easy sitting shot, along
the access road just below 3000 feet, on a Pepper and Salt Skipper.

        Inornate Ringlets were also abundant everywhere, but they seemed to
be slightly past peak. Very few Crescents were seen - they were also past
peak - I have two specimens including one from east (south) of Ludlow along
Rt. 103 and will try to ID them when spread.; a few Silver Bordered
Fritllaries were seen along Rt. 100 south of West Bridgewater.

        We reached the base plateau, and then started back down to look for
someplace to have lunch. After lunch, we headed south toward Amherst, MA to
visit our younger son, who is an Earth Sciences Major. Along Rt. 100 and
103, there were again at elevation, numerous patrolling White Admirals
including a few roadkills. About 20 miles north of I-91 along the
Connecticut River along Rt. 103, we left the Canadian Zone, reached lower
elevations, higher temperatures, and from that point on I saw no more White
Admirals (or any Limenitis).

        One species that I had intended to look for was the Silvery
Checkerspot (C. nycteis). It had been seen on a couple of occasions in
central Vermont during mid/late June (Ascutney Ski Area); also Tony Moore
apparently collected one specimen during the third week of June in the
Yellow Bogs near Island Pond, VT. I found neither it, nor the Harris'
Checkerspot (harrissi) which I had found in very large numbers in
south-central Maine the previous week. Apparently, nycteis has had a poor
flight this season, and also the flight had probably ended by the time I got
around to looking for it. One thing: Along Rt. 4, east of the Killington
Mountain Road and toward West Bridgewater (Rt. 100), after you descend into
the lower areas from the higher plateau, there is what appears to be
excellent habitat for Chlosynes, Bolorias (selene and bellona), Phyciodes,
Euphydryas, Lycaena etc. in extensive low, wet meadow/marshy habitat that is
located to the north side of the highway. This area, which extends for a
couple of miles at least, begs inspection next June.

        One more thing: further south in western Mass., hybrids between the
White Admiral and Red Spotted Purple abound, in various form. A good place
to find multitudes of these is along Stump Sprouts Rd, West Hawley, near Rt.
8 south of Rt. 2 west of Greenfield, MA. In Vermont, including just over the
MA border, I have only found arthemis (no hybrids). I may get to the area
next Saturday.

        Next Sunday, I have a trip planned to Mount Washington, NH. Weekend
after that, wife and I have plans for Maine.

        Alex

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

August 2022
July 2022
June 2022
May 2022
April 2022
March 2022
February 2022
January 2022
November 2021
October 2021
September 2021
August 2021
July 2021
June 2021
May 2021
April 2021
March 2021
September 2020
August 2020
July 2020
June 2020
May 2020
April 2020
October 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LIST.UVM.EDU

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager