LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for SCHOOL-IT Archives


SCHOOL-IT Archives

SCHOOL-IT Archives


SCHOOL-IT@LIST.UVM.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

SCHOOL-IT Home

SCHOOL-IT Home

SCHOOL-IT  March 2004

SCHOOL-IT March 2004

Subject:

Re: High School use of Educational Technology

From:

Doug Reaves <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

School Information Technology Discussion <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 3 Mar 2004 11:29:37 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (110 lines)

From "the ol' curmudgeon":

I am writing with all due respect to the viewpoints of others, but I beg to
differ with the characterization that the excerpt below is powerfully
stated. Lately, I have been speaking out on this list regarding the function
of technology in our classrooms. I probably sound like a broken record and a
little kooky, but I hope no one thinks that I don't value the opinions of
others. I just happen to disagree with the amount of emphasis we place on
the importance of technology in our classrooms. It is important to me (Well,
ok, maybe an obsession.) that we don't lose sight of what it is that our
students really need to be able to do to be successful - which is to be able
to think clearly and originally and with facility in all subject areas. No
doubt computers can help somewhat with this process, but (as you have heard
me say before) I don't think we fully understand the costs (financially,
developmentally, and pedagogically) that are associated with this technology.

This is my response to the comments below:

>Let's have a little competition at school and get ready for the future.
>I will use a laptop and you will use paper and pencil.  Are you ready?
>I will access up-to-date information - you have a textbook that is 5
>years old.

I have never seen "old" information as a problem. We are still wrestling
with the problems posed centuries ago by great philosophers, prophets,
mystics, and scientists. Certainly it would be unhelpful in today's world if
we thought the earth was flat, but even the most up-to-date information is
worthless if we can't determine its accuracy or put it in a larger context
or judge its author's intent. I will argue that most students need more help
with the "wrestling" part of thinking than with the "up-to-date" part of data.

>I will immediately know when I misspell a word; you have to wait until
>it's graded.

Not always. And what good is it to spell correctly but think illogically or
poorly about a problem or be unable to organize your thoughts. Do I need to
spend $1000 on a machine to help me spell when I can't put forward
meaningful ideas?

>I will learn how to care for technology by using it; you will read
>about it.
>I will see math problems in 3d; you will do the odd problems.

I will agree that some math and science simulations are helpful learning
tools, but they must be used in a developmentally appropriate manner and
without forgetting about the real world that surrounds us. Kids already
spend far too much time in front of machines (TV and computer) and far too
little time in the woods or talking to someone. (A recent statistic tells us
that parents spend more time in their cars than talking to their children.)

>I will create artwork and poetry and share it with the world; you will
>share yours with the class.
>I will have 24/7 access; you have the entire class period.

Access to what? As others in this list have discussed, data is not
information and information is not wisdom. Brain work comes between those
pieces. It's the brain work that should concern us...even if it happens with
"old" data.

>I will access the most dynamic information; yours will be printed and
>photocopied.

Wow! Printed information is not dynamic. Let's see: that means the my copies
of works by Aristotle, DesCartes, Arnheim, Audubon, Boaz, etc. are not worth
reading, I guess.

>I will communicate with leaders and experts using email; you will wait
>for Friday's speaker.

Come on! Our leaders and experts don't have time to communicate with
thousands, if not hundreds of thousands, of students. And please tell me
what is wrong with waiting until Friday. Maybe by then, I can have done some
research, come up with some thoughtful ideas and questions, and be fully
ready to understand on a deeper level than if I just fire off an email.
Nothing, nothing, nothing, can beat the richness of direct conversation and
thoughtful dialalog while face to face. Just consider how this message is
being interpreted by all of you without anyone seeing my body language or
hearing the tone of my voice.

>I will select my learning style; you will use the teacher's favorite
>learning style.

Please tell me how most students even become aware of their learning styles
without thoughtful dialog with others...most likely an adult. And please
tell me how we got along for thousands of years learning without the aid of
a computer.

>I will collaborate with my peers from around the world; you will
>collaborate with peers in your classroom.

Yeah, right. Does this mean we don't need to know how to collaborate with
our classroom peers or that it's less important? Does this mean that we
already do a such a fine job of communicating and collaboratine with our
peers that we don't need to practice it anymore? (Note the sarcasm.)

>I will take my learning as far as I want; you must wait for the rest
>of the class.

I believe it is very naive to think that a computer will take anyone as far
as they want in their learning.





Doug Reaves
from his soapbox at
Bellows Free Academy
Fairfax, Vermont

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LIST.UVM.EDU

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager