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SKIVT-L  July 2004, Week 3

SKIVT-L July 2004, Week 3

Subject:

Another article (Very Long) Re: [SKIVT-L] TDF - interview with Greg Lemond

From:

Matthew Kulas <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Vermont Skiing Discussion and Snow Reports <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 19 Jul 2004 16:11:35 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (331 lines)

Here's another article.


Cycling :: Angels With Dirty Faces
Asked to date the death of modern cycling most people will tell you it
died on the 1998 Tour de France. That was the Tour that kicked off in
Dublin but was engulfed in the sport's biggest doping scandal before
even the first wheel had been turned in anger. A team car from the
Festina squad had been stopped by French customs and found to contain
erythropoietin (EPO), human growth hormone (HGH) and masking agents.
The Festina squad was eventually disqualified and other teams withdrew
in a mix of disgrace and disgust as the police began doing what the
Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) and the Societe du Tour de France
wouldn't - raiding hotel rooms, gathering evidence and charging riders
and team personnel with drug and fraud offences. More newspaper ink
was spilled covering the unfolding drugs scandal than telling the
story of the race itself. By the time the race rolled into Paris, it
was clear that the myth was dead and reality was staring everyone in
the face.

But modern cycling had died long before its myth did. In reality,
modern cycling died in 1986, the year Bernard Hinault - the last of
the great titans, one of the five five-time winners of the Tour
(1978-79, 1981-82 and 1985) - passed the crown to his heir-assumptive,
the American, Greg LeMond. Cycling has never been the same since the
demise of Hinault. Sean Kelly aside, the sport has failed to produce
anyone to match the like of him.

The mid-eighties saw the world of cycling changing. Professionalism,
science and technology were making their presence felt. Bernard Tapie
was running La Vie Claire, the team both Hinault and LeMond rode for.
La Vie Claire was at the front of new era of professionalism in
cycling, with technological advances in equipment and a highly
scientific approach to riders' preparation. Tapei would later be
caught up in corruption scandals and be accused of match-fixing during
his tenure as owner of Olympique de Marseille football team and those
scandals only brought home what many believed was going on during his
time with La Vie Claire. Tony Cascarino, who played for Marseilles
under Tapei's reign there claimed that stimulants were a normal part
of player preparation and claimed that Tapei "made it clear my place
in the team depended on me partaking." Tapei was applying to football
knowledge he'd acquired during his time at La Vie Claire.

The dying of the old order had been obvious for several years before
1986. In 1984, the role science would play in the future of cycling
had become clear at the Los Angeles Olympics, where members of the
American cycling team had used blood-doping to boost their chances of
Olympic gold. Blood doping involves the riders donating blood during
training, when the oxygen-carrying red-cell count is high, storing it
and then being infused with it again before a major event. The more
red cells you have, the more effort you can make. In that same year,
Francesco Moser had beaten Eddy Merckx's Hour Record, which had stood
since 1972. Moser did it not once but twice, in the space of one
weekend stretching it from 49.431 kms to 50.808 kms and then 51.151
kms. When Merckx set his record it was claimed he had been unable to
sit down for four days afterwards. Yet here was Moser, with
behind-the-scenes help from Italian doctors Francesco Conconi and
Michele Ferrari, breaking the record twice in one weekend. And he had
used blood-doping to help him do it.

At the time, there was nothing illegal about this practice but clearly
the sport had crossed a threshold. Moser said that: "pure cycling is
just an illusion. There comes a stage when a rider must be told the
effects of a medicine. Then if he wants to, let him take it." As
science has advanced, the ethical issues of such an attitude have come
into sharper focus as riders have resorted to cutting-edge medical
techniques to enhance their performance, often with dire consequences.
Blood-doping brought with it dangers of infection (several of the
American Olympic riders developed hepatitis) and was quickly banned
(though is thought to be still in use).

But by 1987 a new drug had arrived which brought the same benefits as
blood-doping and had a longer-lasting effect on the user. That drug
was EPO, a synthetic form of a naturally occurring hormone. Moser's
medical adviser, Conconi, was among the first to develop a way for
athletes to use EPO without fear of detection. At the time of doing
this, he was also employed by the UCI, charged with developing
anti-doping tests.

Conconi's protege, Ferrari, claimed in 1994 that EPO was as harmless
as orange juice. Even today, Ferrari insists that EPO is not a
dangerous drug. But one of the side effects of EPO is to increase the
risk of heart attack when the user is resting, as it thickens the
blood. With elite athletes having very low heart rates when resting
(many below 40 bpm), the heart is simply unable to pump the thickened
blood around the rider's system. In the late 1980s and early 1990s,
eighteen Belgian and Dutch cyclists died suddenly of heart attacks,
deaths now linked with the arrival of EPO in cycling. But despite
inquiries into sporting fraud by Italian authorities that have lasted
several years, both Ferrari and Conconi have escaped censure. Ferrari
is seen today by many as being the sport's Doctor Frankenstein and his
clients have included - and continue to include - some of the most
famous names in modern cycling.

Cycling's testing for EPO is itself something of a mixed-blessing.
Acknowledging the difficulty of actually detecting EPO use (traces of
the drug itself will have flushed from a rider's system within about
three days of taking it while its effects can last for weeks and
months) the UCI allows riders to have a red-cell count of 50% (a
normal level is about 42%) and bans riders with higher counts for two
weeks "for the benefit of their own health." But that 50% limit allows
riders to use the drug up to a certain level, a point conceded by
Jean-Marie Leblanc of the Societe du Tour de France: "The 50% level is
a compromise, the best we can do at this time. It is set there more
for the riders' protection than anything else. Guys were going
overboard, going up past 60%, and having heart attacks." But even the
UCI's 50% EPO limit can be cheated in twenty minutes, if the rider
drinks enough water to dilute his blood before the test.

The UCI claims it is fighting the drugs war and that they will win.
But their heel-dragging in signing up to the World Anti-Doping
Agency's (WADA) code of practice (they will only be signing after the
end of this year's Tour - they are the only Olympic federation not yet
to sign up to WADA's code of practice) suggests they are not nearly as
serious as they claim to be. Without the sort of random
out-of-competition testing that WADA requires and the punitive bans
they impose for those who fail dope tests, the dopers will always be
able to stay at least one step ahead of the testers. Or - at worst -
fear a minimal ban. Even after the 1998 Tour, riders like Alex Zulle
who admitted to their use of EPO and HGH over a lengthy period ("It's
like being on the highway. The law says there's a speed limit of
sixty-five, but everyone is driving at seventy or faster. Why should I
be the one who obeys the speed limit?" asked Zulle, in his defence)
suffered bans of only six-months duration, allowing most of them to
compete in the following year's Tour. But like the English Football
Association, the UCI seems more concerned with the politics of dope
testing and the adverse PR of riders failing tests than with actually
eliminating drugs from their sport.

* * * * *


Now, as the ninety-first Tour de France prepares to start from the
Belgian town of Liege, it looks like it's just another year for the
professional peloton, with drug stories again filling more column
inches than race reports.

In the past year-and-a-half, at least eight cyclists have died
suddenly in Europe, with suspicion again centering on the use of
performance-enhancing drugs. More and more former cyclists are talking
publicly about the role of drugs in cycling. The Spanish squad Kelme
won't be lining up for this year's Tour following allegations by a
former rider, Jesus Manzano, about that team's use of drugs. And
earlier this year the Cofidis team of British rider David Millar was
forced to voluntarily suspend itself for a month amid allegations from
Philippe Gaumont, a former Cofidis rider, that drug-use was rampant
within the team. The UCI's initial response to Manzano and Gaumont?
They accused them of bringing the sport into disrepute through their
allegations.

Millar has, in the words of his own solicitors, "gone on record to say
that he has never used banned substances." Yet barely a week before
the start of this year's Tour the French paper l'Equippe revealed that
Millar had admitted to French police that he used EPO after police had
found the drug at his Biarritz home. The organisers of the Tour,
bowing to demands from the French Sports Minister to ban any rider
charged with a doping offence, finally agreed to "not accept the
participation of any rider involved in a judicial procedure or
implicated in a police inquiry" and barred Millar from competing in
the Tour.

Meanwhile, Lance Armstrong (Tour winner 1999-2003) is the focus of a
new book from David Walsh and Pierre Ballester ('LA Confidentiel: Les
secrets de Lance Armstrong'). In it, the Irish and French journalists
cite claims by Armstrong's former soigneur (Irish-woman Emma O'Reilly)
and a former team-mate (Australian Stephen Swart) linking Armstrong
himself with EPO, alleging that when traces of steroids were found in
a 1999 test they were excused by the use of a back-dated prescription
for a cortisone-based cream for saddle-sores and claiming that
Armstrong admitted to doctors treating him for testicular cancer that
he had taken performance-enhancing drugs.

Armstrong has never officially failed a drugs test but since his
return to professional cycling after treatment for cancer in 1996 and
1997 doubts have dogged him and his staggering performances. When it
was revealed in 2001 by Walsh that Armstrong has been a client of
Ferrari's since 1995 (the two were introduced by Eddy Merckx), Greg
LeMond spoke for many cycling fans when he said: "When Lance won the
prologue to the 1999 Tour I was close to tears, but when I heard he
was working with Michele Ferrari I was devastated. In the light of
Lance's relationship with Ferrari, I just don't want to comment on
this year's Tour. This is not sour grapes. I'm disappointed in Lance,
that's all it is."

In a phone conversation between LeMond and Armstrong quoted in Walsh's
new book, LeMond is reported as having told Armstrong: "I have a
problem with Ferrari. I'm disappointed you are seeing someone like
Ferrari. I have a personal issue with Ferrari and doctors like him. I
feel my career was cut short, I watched a team mate die, I saw the
devastation of innocent riders losing their careers. I don't like what
has become of our sport."

* * * * *

In the eyes of many cycling fans the biggest crime is not doping. It
is the claims of many that there is no doping in cycling, despite all
the evidence to the contrary. Cycling has never been a clean sport,
and it will probably never be a clean sport. Everyone who has followed
cycling, even at a distance, knows the role drugs play in the sport.

Jacques Anquetil (Tour winner 1957, 1961-64) admitted that "you don't
win the Tour de France on mineral water." He had led a riders' revolt
in the 1966 Tour when drug tests were introduced: "We find these tests
degrading. Why do cyclists have to be suspected and controlled while
any other free man can do what he likes and take what he likes?"

Questioned about the role of amphetamines in cycling and whether he
had used amphetamines, Fausto Coppi (Tour winner 1949 and 1953)
replied "Only when necessary." Asked how often that was, Coppi replied
"Almost all the time." Go back to the 1924 Tour and remember the words
of Henri Pelissier: "Do you want to see how we keep going? That's
cocaine to go in our eyes. Chloroform for our gums. This is ointment
to warm the knees. And pills, do you want to see the pills?" His
brother, Francis, added: "We keep going on dynamite. In the evenings
we dance around our rooms instead of sleeping."

No one forgets the death of the English rider Tom Simpson on Mount
Ventoux in the 1967 Tour. Simpson, dosed up with a mix of alcohol and
amphetamines, collapsed on the side of the sun-scorched volcano and
died. Ten years earlier the French philosopher Roland Barthes
described the Ventoux thus: "The Ventoux, thrusting abundantly
skywards, is a god of Evil to whom sacrifice must be paid. A true
Moloch, a despot of cyclists, it never pardons the weak and exacts an
unjust tribute of suffering." In those pre-Ben Johnson days, Simpson's
death elevated him to the status of hero. His death was seen as a
sacrifice to the gods of cycling, it didn't condemn him to the status
of villain.

No one cannot but be aware of Paul Kimmage's 1990 book, 'A Rough
Ride', in which he told the story of drugs in sport as he had
witnessed it in his own professional career during the Roche-Kelly
years. Other riders have come out with similar books, including Freddy
Maertens' 1988 book 'Niet van Horen Zeggen' (translated in 1993 as
'Fall From Grace') and Erwann Mentheour's 2000 book, 'Secret Defonce:
Ma Verite sur le Dopage'. But many choose to be blind to the
blindingly obvious. Stephen Roche's condemnation of Kimmage for
spitting in the soup - taken with Roche's own links to Ferrari and
doubts over his own miraculous return from a career-crippling knee
injury - demonstrates the attitude of most cyclists. Denial.

We have long since passed the point of the naive young baseball fan
who faced down Shoeless Joe Jackson with his "say it isn't so, Joe" at
the height of the Black Sox scandal in baseball. It's time everyone
stopped treating fans as if they were naive kids and admitted the
truth. It would be nice if, the next time a rider was asked the simple
question of whether he has ever used drugs in his cycling career, he
told the truth and listed all the drugs - the legal and the illegal -
he has used and left the fans to decide for themselves how clean that
makes him, instead of persisting with the myth of a clean sport.

The time has come for the riders to stop hiding behind masking agents
and Clintonesque semantic games over the meaning of the word drugs. To
stop pretending that if it hasn't been detected by the dope controls,
then it isn't a drug. Or that if it isn't currently on the UCI's
banned list then it isn't a drug (Pedro Delgado's defence in 1988 when
he tested positive for probenecid, then commonly used as a masking
agent to hide steroid use). Or that if it has been found by a dope
control, that it doesn't count if it can be excused by the use of a
back-dated prescription for a saddle-sore cream (Armstrong) or an
asthma inhaler (Miguel Indurain). Or that the drugs found in their
possession were for their wife, their grandmother or their
mother-in-law (Ferrari). Or that, all other excuses failing, there was
an error in the test (Marco Pantani). The sport may never be clean but
it's high time that the riders came clean and admitted what's really
going on. They may be able to convince themselves that they are
innocent victims but they cannot convince the sport's fans.

* * * * *

With doping allegations levelled at every Tour winner since Hinault we
may be going through an age in which there are no more heroes anymore,
or at the least an age in which our heroes are shown to have feet of
clay and not the winged ankles so often associated with the heroes of
old. But the sport has still produced its moments of magic for us to
marvel at. Think of Roche's climb up to La Plagne in the 1987 Tour.
Think of his victory in that year's Giro, achieved against his own
team mates and the Italian tifosi. And think of his victory in the
World Championships that year when, riding for Sean Kelly, he found
himself in the final break and, with Kelly unable to bridge the gap,
he took the coveted Rainbow jersey.

Think of the riders' response to the death of Fabio Casartelli in the
1995 Tour, when they rode the stage after Casartelli's death as a
funeral procession, with Casartelli's Motorolla team coming to the
front of the peloton at the end of the stage and fanning out to cross
the line as one. Think too of Armstrong's victory into Limoges the
following day, when he pointed to the heavens as he rode to the line,
dedicating the win to his fallen team mate.

Think of Pantani's shattering of Jan Ullrich on the Cold du Galibier
and les Deux Alpes in 1998, turning a three minute deficit into a six
minute advantage and riding into Paris in the race leader's maillot
jaune.

And, of course, think of the whole of the 2003 Tour, which rates as a
classic in Tour history. Armstrong rode like a true champion - with
class - when it really mattered in the Alps and his final victory was
only assured when Ullrich crashed in the penultimate stage.

Drugs shouldn't tarnish these memories. Drugs alone will not allow
these feats to be achieved. There has to be something else and it is
that something else which cycling fans want most to celebrate. Barthes
summed up that something else as being "the privileged equilibrium
between quality of muscles, acuity of intelligence and force of
character."

Despite acknowledging the role of drugs in cycling, I'll still be
tuning into Eurosport throughout July to listen to the race
commentary. I'll remember my own recreational rides over the
cobbled-hills of Belgium and the Alpine climbs I've crawled over and
know that I will never know the level of pain and suffering Tour
riders put themselves through day after day, with or without drugs.
And when the commentary finally gets to me I'll just turn the sound
down, stick on my Kraftwerk CD and remember these words from Antoine
Blondin:

"As sports fans, we prefer to dream about angels on wheels, Simon
Pures somehow immune to the uppers and downers of our own pill-popping
society. There is, all the same, a certain nobility in those who have
gone down into God knows what hell in search of the best of
themselves. We might feel tempted to tell them they should not have
done it, but we can remain secretly proud of what they have done.
Their wan, haggard looks are for us an offering."

This article appears in the July issue of Sigla Magazine

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
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June 2012, Week 3
June 2012, Week 2
June 2012, Week 1
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May 2012, Week 4
May 2012, Week 3
May 2012, Week 2
May 2012, Week 1
April 2012, Week 5
April 2012, Week 4
April 2012, Week 3
April 2012, Week 2
April 2012, Week 1
March 2012, Week 5
March 2012, Week 4
March 2012, Week 3
March 2012, Week 2
March 2012, Week 1
February 2012, Week 5
February 2012, Week 4
February 2012, Week 3
February 2012, Week 2
February 2012, Week 1
January 2012, Week 5
January 2012, Week 4
January 2012, Week 3
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January 2012, Week 1
December 2011, Week 5
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December 2011, Week 3
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December 2011, Week 1
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November 2011, Week 4
November 2011, Week 3
November 2011, Week 2
November 2011, Week 1
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October 2011, Week 3
October 2011, Week 2
October 2011, Week 1
September 2011, Week 5
September 2011, Week 4
September 2011, Week 3
September 2011, Week 2
September 2011, Week 1
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August 2011, Week 4
August 2011, Week 3
August 2011, Week 2
August 2011, Week 1
July 2011, Week 5
July 2011, Week 4
July 2011, Week 3
July 2011, Week 2
July 2011, Week 1
June 2011, Week 5
June 2011, Week 4
June 2011, Week 3
June 2011, Week 2
June 2011, Week 1
May 2011, Week 5
May 2011, Week 4
May 2011, Week 3
May 2011, Week 2
May 2011, Week 1
April 2011, Week 5
April 2011, Week 4
April 2011, Week 3
April 2011, Week 2
April 2011, Week 1
March 2011, Week 5
March 2011, Week 4
March 2011, Week 3
March 2011, Week 2
March 2011, Week 1
February 2011, Week 4
February 2011, Week 3
February 2011, Week 2
February 2011, Week 1
January 2011, Week 5
January 2011, Week 4
January 2011, Week 3
January 2011, Week 2
January 2011, Week 1
December 2010, Week 5
December 2010, Week 4
December 2010, Week 3
December 2010, Week 2
December 2010, Week 1
November 2010, Week 5
November 2010, Week 4
November 2010, Week 3
November 2010, Week 2
November 2010, Week 1
October 2010, Week 5
October 2010, Week 4
October 2010, Week 3
October 2010, Week 2
October 2010, Week 1
September 2010, Week 5
September 2010, Week 4
September 2010, Week 3
September 2010, Week 2
September 2010, Week 1
August 2010, Week 5
August 2010, Week 4
August 2010, Week 3
August 2010, Week 2
August 2010, Week 1
July 2010, Week 5
July 2010, Week 4
July 2010, Week 3
July 2010, Week 2
July 2010, Week 1
June 2010, Week 5
June 2010, Week 4
June 2010, Week 3
June 2010, Week 2
June 2010, Week 1
May 2010, Week 5
May 2010, Week 4
May 2010, Week 3
May 2010, Week 2
May 2010, Week 1
April 2010, Week 5
April 2010, Week 4
April 2010, Week 3
April 2010, Week 2
April 2010, Week 1
March 2010, Week 5
March 2010, Week 4
March 2010, Week 3
March 2010, Week 2
March 2010, Week 1
February 2010, Week 4
February 2010, Week 3
February 2010, Week 2
February 2010, Week 1
January 2010, Week 5
January 2010, Week 4
January 2010, Week 3
January 2010, Week 2
January 2010, Week 1
December 2009, Week 5
December 2009, Week 4
December 2009, Week 3
December 2009, Week 2
December 2009, Week 1
November 2009, Week 5
November 2009, Week 4
November 2009, Week 3
November 2009, Week 2
November 2009, Week 1
October 2009, Week 5
October 2009, Week 4
October 2009, Week 3
October 2009, Week 2
October 2009, Week 1
September 2009, Week 5
September 2009, Week 4
September 2009, Week 3
September 2009, Week 2
September 2009, Week 1
August 2009, Week 5
August 2009, Week 4
August 2009, Week 3
August 2009, Week 2
August 2009, Week 1
July 2009, Week 5
July 2009, Week 4
July 2009, Week 3
July 2009, Week 2
July 2009, Week 1
June 2009, Week 5
June 2009, Week 4
June 2009, Week 3
June 2009, Week 2
June 2009, Week 1
May 2009, Week 5
May 2009, Week 4
May 2009, Week 3
May 2009, Week 2
May 2009, Week 1
April 2009, Week 5
April 2009, Week 4
April 2009, Week 3
April 2009, Week 2
April 2009, Week 1
March 2009, Week 5
March 2009, Week 4
March 2009, Week 3
March 2009, Week 2
March 2009, Week 1
February 2009, Week 4
February 2009, Week 3
February 2009, Week 2
February 2009, Week 1
January 2009, Week 5
January 2009, Week 4
January 2009, Week 3
January 2009, Week 2
January 2009, Week 1
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December 2008, Week 3
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November 2008, Week 3
November 2008, Week 2
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October 2008, Week 3
October 2008, Week 2
October 2008, Week 1
September 2008, Week 5
September 2008, Week 4
September 2008, Week 3
September 2008, Week 2
September 2008, Week 1
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August 2008, Week 4
August 2008, Week 3
August 2008, Week 2
August 2008, Week 1
July 2008, Week 5
July 2008, Week 4
July 2008, Week 3
July 2008, Week 2
July 2008, Week 1
June 2008, Week 5
June 2008, Week 4
June 2008, Week 3
June 2008, Week 2
June 2008, Week 1
May 2008, Week 5
May 2008, Week 4
May 2008, Week 3
May 2008, Week 2
May 2008, Week 1
April 2008, Week 5
April 2008, Week 4
April 2008, Week 3
April 2008, Week 2
April 2008, Week 1
March 2008, Week 5
March 2008, Week 4
March 2008, Week 3
March 2008, Week 2
March 2008, Week 1
February 2008, Week 5
February 2008, Week 4
February 2008, Week 3
February 2008, Week 2
February 2008, Week 1
January 2008, Week 5
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January 2008, Week 3
January 2008, Week 2
January 2008, Week 1
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December 2007, Week 3
December 2007, Week 2
December 2007, Week 1
November 2007, Week 5
November 2007, Week 4
November 2007, Week 3
November 2007, Week 2
November 2007, Week 1
October 2007, Week 5
October 2007, Week 4
October 2007, Week 3
October 2007, Week 2
October 2007, Week 1
September 2007, Week 5
September 2007, Week 4
September 2007, Week 3
September 2007, Week 2
September 2007, Week 1
August 2007, Week 5
August 2007, Week 4
August 2007, Week 3
August 2007, Week 2
August 2007, Week 1
July 2007, Week 5
July 2007, Week 4
July 2007, Week 3
July 2007, Week 2
July 2007, Week 1
June 2007, Week 5
June 2007, Week 4
June 2007, Week 3
June 2007, Week 2
June 2007, Week 1
May 2007, Week 5
May 2007, Week 4
May 2007, Week 3
May 2007, Week 2
May 2007, Week 1
April 2007, Week 5
April 2007, Week 4
April 2007, Week 3
April 2007, Week 2
April 2007, Week 1
March 2007, Week 5
March 2007, Week 4
March 2007, Week 3
March 2007, Week 2
March 2007, Week 1
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February 2007, Week 1
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January 2007, Week 3
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January 2007, Week 1
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November 2006, Week 3
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October 2006, Week 3
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October 2006, Week 1
September 2006, Week 5
September 2006, Week 4
September 2006, Week 3
September 2006, Week 2
September 2006, Week 1
August 2006, Week 5
August 2006, Week 4
August 2006, Week 3
August 2006, Week 2
August 2006, Week 1
July 2006, Week 5
July 2006, Week 4
July 2006, Week 3
July 2006, Week 2
July 2006, Week 1
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June 2006, Week 4
June 2006, Week 3
June 2006, Week 2
June 2006, Week 1
May 2006, Week 5
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May 2006, Week 3
May 2006, Week 2
May 2006, Week 1
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April 2006, Week 4
April 2006, Week 3
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October 2005, Week 3
October 2005, Week 2
October 2005, Week 1
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September 2005, Week 4
September 2005, Week 3
September 2005, Week 2
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June 2005, Week 2
June 2005, Week 1
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May 2005, Week 3
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April 2005, Week 3
April 2005, Week 2
April 2005, Week 1
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March 2005, Week 4
March 2005, Week 3
March 2005, Week 2
March 2005, Week 1
February 2005, Week 4
February 2005, Week 3
February 2005, Week 2
February 2005, Week 1
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November 2003, Week 3
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February 2003, Week 3
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January 2003, Week 3
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December 2002, Week 2
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November 2002, Week 3
November 2002, Week 2
November 2002, Week 1
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October 2002, Week 4
October 2002, Week 3
October 2002, Week 2
October 2002, Week 1
September 2002, Week 5
September 2002, Week 4
September 2002, Week 3
September 2002, Week 2
September 2002, Week 1
August 2002, Week 5
August 2002, Week 4
August 2002, Week 3
August 2002, Week 2
August 2002, Week 1
July 2002, Week 5
July 2002, Week 4
July 2002, Week 3
July 2002, Week 2
July 2002, Week 1
June 2002, Week 5
June 2002, Week 4
June 2002, Week 3
June 2002, Week 2
June 2002, Week 1
May 2002, Week 5
May 2002, Week 4
May 2002, Week 3
May 2002, Week 2
May 2002, Week 1
April 2002, Week 5
April 2002, Week 4
April 2002, Week 3
April 2002, Week 2
April 2002, Week 1
March 2002, Week 5
March 2002, Week 4
March 2002, Week 3
March 2002, Week 2
March 2002, Week 1
February 2002, Week 4
February 2002, Week 3
February 2002, Week 2
February 2002, Week 1
January 2002, Week 5
January 2002, Week 4
January 2002, Week 3
January 2002, Week 2
January 2002, Week 1
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December 2001, Week 4
December 2001, Week 3
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March 2001, Week 5
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December 1998, Week 5
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