LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for UVMWOMENSSOCCER Archives


UVMWOMENSSOCCER Archives

UVMWOMENSSOCCER Archives


UVMWOMENSSOCCER@LIST.UVM.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

UVMWOMENSSOCCER Home

UVMWOMENSSOCCER Home

UVMWOMENSSOCCER  January 2005

UVMWOMENSSOCCER January 2005

Subject:

Student-Athlete Services Teaches Life Skills

From:

UVM Sports Information <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

UVM Womens Soccer Mailing List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 24 Jan 2005 14:13:11 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (102 lines)

Student-Athlete Services Teaches Life Skills
January 24, 2005


The University of Vermont athletic department has seen many changes occur over
the past two years, designed to help further the success of teams on campus.
Facility upgrades, new staff and a new attitude are all apparent, but the
changes have not just been geared toward improving athletic performance. There
is also a greater emphasis on academic success and personal development.

That is where Joe Gervais comes in.

A 1988 graduate of Vermont, Gervais returned to his alma mater in 1992 after
spending four years teaching English and serving as an assistant hockey and
football coach at Choate Rosemary Hall in Wallingford, Conn. Gervais spent
eight years as an assistant men's ice hockey coach at Vermont, received his
master's degree in education at UVM in 2000, and is currently working toward
his doctoral degree in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies.

In 2000, the NCAA began requiring participation at the Division I level in the
CHAMPS/Life Skills program that it had started five years prior as a pilot
program. CHAMPS is an acronym for 'Challenging Athletes' Minds for Personal
Success.' Its commitment statement is made up of five parts:
* Commitment to Academic Excellence
* Commitment to Athletic Excellence
* Commitment to Personal Development
* Commitment to Career Development
* Commitment to Service

The creation of the CHAMPS program was prompted by the recognition that colleges
and universities needed a wider range of student-athlete services. The
CHAMPS/Life Skills program helps deliver a comprehensive education program for
student-athletes and also gives them someone who is not their coach and not
their athletic director to discuss issues with. The NCAA does not provide
funding for the program, but does provide materials and holds orientation and
continuing education conferences for directors of the campus programs to get
together and share ideas.

Prior to the NCAA's requirement of the program, there was no similar program in
place at Vermont. An alum and former Catamount student-athlete, Gervais was
hired in the fall of 2000 to establish the program. He spent the first year
assessing the needs of the university's student-athletes and then developed a
program to address those needs. Starting in the fall of 2001, Vermont has
offered a mandatory Life Skills class for all first-year student-athletes,
which meets once a week for a semester and addresses academic skills, health
behaviors, and leadership.

“Life Skills has enabled us to develop in our student-athletes not only specific
skills, but also a greater sense of a larger vision, that they are a part of
something bigger than just their team,” said Gervais. “It is partly a
community-building function.”

As the coordinator of the Life Skills program, Gervais develops the curriculum
for the class among his many duties. He also conducts orientation sessions for
new student-athletes, serves as an academic counselor, advises the
Student-Athlete Advisory Council (SAAC), helps organize leadership training for
all team, and is the Athletic Department liaison to campus offices such as
Residential Life, the Counseling Center, the Dean of Students office, and
Career Services.

The Life Skills program has grown over the years and is now referred to as
Student-Athlete Services. There is now a more structured academic support plan
in place, along with a bigger staff. Gary Bruening, the former gymnastics coach
at Vermont, is now the full-time Academic Coordinator, after holding the
position on a part-time basis prior to this year. There are also two graduate
assistants who are part of the support staff.

In addition, the athletic department made a significant investment in the
Student-Athlete Services facility during the 2003-04 year with new computers,
office and meeting space and wireless internet access in the Kinsler Life
Skills Center.

Bruening coordinates academic support for Vermont's student-athletes and serves
as the department's liaison to the Learning Cooperative, ACCESS program, and
the various academic units on campus. The support program in place includes
mandatory study table for first-year students and those below team GPA
thresholds, individual meetings with support staff, and periodic progress
reports from faculty members.

Gervais says that the biggest hurdle that student-athletes tend to face is time
management, and the support staff helps them to break down their work into
smaller segments and to utilize every available piece of time they have during
the week. “Every student is different, but most of the time it is a matter of
just getting down on paper what their commitments are,” Gervais said. “When
they (student-athletes) have their classes, practices, and other commitments
written out, they can see how much time they have left to work with.”

The Student-Athlete Services program has helped sustain the level of academic
performance that the university is accustomed to, despite increased demands on
today's student-athletes. In the fall semester, Vermont's student-athletes
achieved a collective GPA of 3.08, higher than the overall student body mark of
2.96. Sixteen of Vermont's 20 teams (80 percent) earned a 3.0 or better over
that time period, with two others just missing the mark by just five
one-hundredths of a point. Nearly two-thirds of the student-athletes earned
better than a 3.0, while 46 earned a 3.8 or better, including 11
student-athletes who recorded a perfect 4.0.




Vermont Athletic Communications

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LIST.UVM.EDU

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager