LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for SCHOOL-IT Archives


SCHOOL-IT Archives

SCHOOL-IT Archives


SCHOOL-IT@LIST.UVM.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

SCHOOL-IT Home

SCHOOL-IT Home

SCHOOL-IT  April 2005

SCHOOL-IT April 2005

Subject:

Teenagers struggle with privacy, security issues

From:

Steve Cavrak <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

School Information Technology Discussion <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 22 Apr 2005 12:44:03 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (137 lines)

Teenagers struggle with privacy, security issues
By Robert Lemos, SecurityFocus Apr 18 2005 10:46AM
http://www.securityfocus.com/news/10940

SEATTLE -- High-schools students have a message for their parents:
Trust us
with technology. Security and privacy? We have it covered.

A panel of teenagers speaking at the Computers, Freedom and Privacy
Conference told attendees on Friday that they are far more in tune with
technology than their parents and have come to understand the issues of
security and privacy on the Internet largely without any guidance from
educators or their parents.

"We don't go over Internet security, we don't go after 'Watch out for
that,
because your identity can be stolen,'" said Elizabeth, a 16-year-old
junior
at Seattle Prepatory School. "I don't know that a school should be
giving
courses in computer ethics, but they should talk about computer
security. If
you are going to have a computer in the classroom, talk to kids about --
hey, you might see an adult site, that there are Internet predators out
there, they exist, you kids need to be careful -- you know, give them
the
basic education."

The panel of five teenagers described the benefits of growing up in the
Internet Age as well as how they deal with the dangers. Because the
teenagers are all minors, their last names will not be used.

The group said that they had to learn about many of the pitfalls on the
Internet on their own. Parents and schools tended not to know how to
address
the subject of security and privacy on the Internet.

"Every kid, when they reach a certain age, have The Talk with their
parents," said Steven, a 16-year-old junior at Sammanish High School.
"We
need to have the same sort of discussion in terms of privacy. The
majority
of teenagers know about the sexual diseases out there because of this
conversation that they have with their parents or because of they have
the
talk in school in sex ed. I think (security) needs to be addressed the
same
as well."

'I think it is hard for the parents and educators because we are moving
at a
different pace than they are... no offense. It feels like we are done
and on
to the next thing by the time other people are aware of it.'
-- Elizabeth, a 16-year-old junior at Seattle Prepatory School

A major problem for the kids is that they are, in general, far ahead of
their parents in terms of Internet usage. The teenagers blogged
regularly,
used instant messaging to keep up with their friends, and were usually
able
to circumvent any computer security measures at school, they said.

"I think it is hard for the parents and educators because we are moving
at a
different pace than they are... no offense," said Elizabeth. "It feels
like
we are done and on to the next thing by the time other people are aware
of
it."

Yet, the teenagers also admitted that the group of five and their
friends
were more savvy than many other students. For example, some students at
their schools blogged under their real names and included many real life
details, which the panel of teenagers believed was a danger.

"If you want to give out you first name, then go ahead, nobody is going
to
stop you," Cathy, a 17-year-old senior from Newport High School, said
on the
topic of the students' concerns about sexual predators. "But you should
know
that there are so-and-so types of people out there."

The teenagers had mixed opinions on how much should be taught at school
regarding Internet safety. Some believed that ethics in the digital
world
should be a required topic, while others thought that only basic safety
should be taught. However, they did agree that parents and schools
should be
talking about the Internet with their kids far sooner than they do
today --
at least by fifth grade, they said.

However, when parents fear for their children's safety turns into, what
the
teenagers see as, violations of privacy, then it is definitely not cool,
they said.

"My mom has blocked the TV, the computer and I'm not allowed to listen
to a
lot of radio stations right now," said Elizabeth. "It is a very bizarre
experience for me. I really feel like she doesn't trust me anymore. She
hasn't demanded my password, but I know that she knows it, and I'm
pretty
sure she has gone onto my computer."

Other panellists saw such tactics as easily circumvented security
measures.
Some suggested they would have an e-mail that the parents would not know
about in order to protect their own privacy.

"My parents wanted to check my computer, so I stopped using that
computer,"
said Morgan, a 17-year-old senior at Mountlake Terrace High School. "I
use
the computers at school. There are things that they don't need to know."

Such opinions and view points should be kept in mind by parents, as
they try
to protect their children from digital dangers, said one privacy expert.

"In general, society does not pay enough attention to what young people
think, particularly in policy questions involving students and schools,"
said Kevin Bankson, an attorney and fellow with the Electronic Frontier
Foundation and a moderator at the panel.

The general feeling among the teenagers, however, was that parents
should
talk about the issues with their kids.

"The most important thing is don't talk down to us," said Morgan. "For
the
most part. we are not dumb."
http://www.securityfocus.com/news/10940

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LIST.UVM.EDU

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager