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COMMUNET  April 2005, Week 5

COMMUNET April 2005, Week 5

Subject:

Israel's tech titans are challenging Canadian entrepreneurs as a global force

From:

John Walker <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Community and Civic Network discussion list <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 29 Apr 2005 10:49:23 -0400

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Excerpt the CSS Internet News.

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Israel's tech titans are challenging Canadian entrepreneurs as a global force

Aron Heller in Tel Aviv and James Bagnall in Ottawa
The Ottawa Citizen
April 28, 2005
http://www.canada.com/technology/story.html?id=9e8a7835-facf-4592-8c58-5d5d7839cfbf

It's a common Hebrew expression: "holech al gadol," which translates
directly to "going for big." In casual usage, the words describe an
ambitious person but they also apply in a larger sense to 21st century
Israel. Look just about anywhere in this country -- from the heart of the
Negev desert in the south to the R&D heartland of Haifa towards the north
-- and you'll see signs of a remarkable economic renaissance anchored by
Israel's role as a high-tech proving ground.

The new cross-country super-highway, the massive state-of-the-art passenger
terminal at Ben Gurion Airport and the sky-scraping Azrieli towers in
downtown Tel Aviv are the most obvious manifestations. But you can see it,
too, in the clusters of high-tech startups that radiate outward from Tel
Aviv in ever-expanding waves.

The country's high-tech economy should be on its knees by now. It was hit
by a double-whammy in 2000 when dot-com stocks crashed at almost precisely
the same time as the Palestinians launched their second intifada. Israeli's
entrepreneurs struggled to make do with meagre financing against the
backdrop of a wave of suicide bombings.

Yet, as Israel and the Palestinians take the first tentative steps towards
a possible accord, Israel's tech titans are in remarkably good shape -- so
good in fact that Israel is starting to challenge Canada as a tech power,
not just in relative terms but dollar for dollar.

Consider that Israeli startups last year for the first time attracted more
venture capital than Canadian firms -- $1.4 billion compared with $1.36
billion (all figures U.S. dollars). Evidence of the global ambition of
Israeli's entrepreneurs can be seen in the fact that more than 70 Israeli
technology firms trade on America's two biggest stock exchanges.

Only Canada has more foreign listings on Nasdaq and the New York Stock
Exchange, but many of these are energy, utilities and railway stocks.

When it comes to technology listings, Israel is the leader.

Collectively, the Canadian technology firms are worth more -- $68 billion
compared with not quite $53 billion for the Israeli tech companies. But
considering Canada's proximity to the U.S. and its hugely bigger economy
(eight times Israel's size), the performance of Israel's tech entrepreneurs
is remarkable.

"Relative to the size of the country," says Efrat Zakai, director of
research for Israel Venture Capital, "we are a dominant power in the global
high-tech market."

The explanation? Start with an infectious entrepreneurial spirit nurtured
by generous government backing of R&D. The latest manifestation: the launch
in February of the $88 million Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute at
Israel's oldest university, the Technion. (See separate story, F5). Like
many Israeli research endeavours, the Institute has a strategic element.
Its scientists will be developing a whole range of new products and
materials engineered with perfect precision down to the level of dozens of
atoms.

"We want to position Israel at the forefront of science and technology,"
says Prof. Uri Sivan, the director of the Institute. "A country that does
not have research in the nano field will not be a progressive country."

Israel's prowess in high tech also owes a lot to the influence of the
military, where many of Israel's engineers were trained. An important
catalyst was the immigration in the early 1990s of thousands of trained
Russian engineers. For good measure, throw in a tight global network of
accomplished Jewish tech executives who offer Israeli entrepreneurs
introductions to customers, technology partners and financiers.

And that still doesn't explain everything. Look closely at the track record
of Israeli firms during the tech recession of 2001-2004, and you'll
discover they weathered the storm better than many of their Canadian
counterparts.

Call it what you will -- an instinct for self-preservation, perhaps -- but
Israeli's global corporations played the recession with consummate skill.

The top Israeli performer, Teva Pharmaceutical, has tripled its market
value in the past five years. It had a market capitalization earlier this
week of $20.2 billion -- nearly two-thirds higher than that of Canada's
most valuable technology company, Research in Motion Ltd., the manufacturer
of the BlackBerry wireless e-mail device. Few people have heard of Teva
(pronounced TAY-va, Hebrew for nature). But with its acquisition of
Toronto-based Novopharm in 2000, Teva became North America's largest maker
of generic drugs, from antibiotics to painkillers.

The other Israeli giants -- Amdocs (telecom billing software), Check Point
Software (electronic firewalls) and Comverse Technology (voice recognition
and call answering software) -- have suffered substantial declines in share
value since the tech peak. But they did not fall as far as Canada's stars
such as Nortel, JDS Uniphase and PMC-Sierra. This is partly a matter of
laser-like focus. In general, the Israeli firms did not get distracted as
Nortel did and use inflated market values to buy their way into businesses
they did not understand. They concentrated on the basics.

The Israelis also seemed to possess a deeper appreciation of the potential
risks to their companies. They were (and still are) very careful to keep
adding to their very strong reserves of cash. For instance, when Check
Point suffered a $100-million drop in revenues in 2002 -- the worst year of
the tech bust -- it still managed to produce a profit of $255 million. By
year-end 2004, Check Point had $1.6 billion worth of cash on hand, roughly
equivalent to three years of sales.

Amdocs, which experienced some losses during the recession, nevertheless
finished up 2004 with $1.2 billion in the bank (eight months worth of
sales) while Comverse had $2.25 billion in cash (the equivalent of more
than two years of company revenues). Nortel, in sharp contrast, has only
several months worth of cash on hand as a safeguard against unforeseen threats.

The big Israeli stars are the inspiration for literally thousands of
national startups -- and not just because they've achieved global stature.
A lot of it has to do with the way the founders used natural Israeli
strengths to build the businesses in the first place.

Gil Shwed, the billionaire CEO and founder of Check Point, spent four years
with military intelligence units where he learned how to connect
communications networks that had different levels of security.

That knowledge was the foundation of Check Point's first product line, a
security firewall.

Amdocs founder Boaz Dotan got his start in the Israeli Ministry of
Communications where he was put in charge of the telephone inquiries unit.
Later Dotan would develop commercial billing systems for Aurec, the
precursor to Amdocs.

Check Point, Amdocs and Comverse were all launched in the days before
Israel really had a venture capital industry. They grew the hard way, by
patiently adding customers one at a time and waiting for profits before
adding new offices and equipment.

The real trigger for Israel's startup boom was the late 1990s purchase by
America Online of Mirabilis, an e-mail firm run by three Israelis in their
twenties. Mirabilis invented ICQ, the first significant internet chat
service, and ushered in a seismic shift in Israeli society. Two of the
founders were high school dropouts. Following the $400-million purchase,
Israel went tech crazy and "start up" became a permanent term in Israeli
vocabulary and a cultural symbol for success.

By 2000, more than $3 billion annually was being pumped into Israeli
startups, 59 per cent of it from abroad. Although venture investments are
down considerably from the boom -- they're running about half the level of
the peak -- there is a feeling here that the worst is over. Not only are
Israeli venture firms raising more money -- $800 million last year compared
to virtually nil in 2002 and 2003 -- but there are signs Israel's startups
are doing well where it counts. They're being bought for respectable prices.

The latest example is Verisity Ltd., an IT and enterprise software company
that was acquired by Cadence Design Systems for $286 million.

Native Networks, a developer of high-speed optical networks, is another
one. It was sold earlier this year to Alcatel for $55 million.

The company got started partly thanks to Skypoint Capital, a Kanata-based
venture capitalist, who got in on the ground floor back in 1999. Gilad
Goren, the founder and chief scientist, was a physicist before he decided
to jump on the high-tech bandwagon.

"I said to myself, 'Everybody else is doing it. I'll get a start up,
too,''' he said. "Everybody wants to be Mirabilis."

The company quickly raised $45 million and got to work. With the Intifada
waging and foreign governments issuing travel advisories to their citizens
not to travel to the holy land, Israeli entrepreneurs were forced to hit
the road.

"I know I don't have a client in Israel. I don't have a problem to travel
anywhere," said Goren. "We are a local branch of Silicon Valley."

It's something Israelis have become accustomed to. They make up for the
physical distances with persistence and energy. Goren once took an
overnight flight from Israel to New York to participate in a 9 a.m. meeting
in New Jersey and returned to Israel that very night.

"We Israelis are crazy," he said with a smile.

Goren, 44, said the greatest success of his company was the mere fact they
survived the bust. He didn't quite get the lucrative exit he had dreamed
of, but he said he didn't have to worry about buying homes for his two
young daughters either.

Goren now splits his time between giving strategic advice to other firms
and working on his own new start up idea -- "the next big thing," he said.
He hopes to retire within five years.

Doron Nevo has no plans to retire anytime soon. His company, KiloLambda,
makes specialized optical components for Telecom applications and is still
in the R&D stage. It was founded four years ago with $5 million, half of
which was provided by Skypoint, in a completely different atmosphere than
the euphoria of the late '90s. The company hopes to become profitable in
2007 and doesn't harbour the same grandiose ambitions of some of its
predecessors.

"Today, people know that the days of the big bubble are gone and you have
to build a profitable company with a firm base," he said. "It's much harder
than it used to be."

Even in this new world, Israelis are thriving. Many Israelis are returning
home from top U.S. business schools which means management of Israeli
companies has improved dramatically.

"Israel has changed totally in the past 10 years from a place where people
would look at companies that could only do R&D and come up with a brilliant
idea but have a problem taking that into volume manufacturing and
distribution, which involves more management capabilities," Nevo says. "I
think that has changed."

Israel, like Canada, depends hugely on export markets. But its tech firms
sell to a more diverse range of customers -- revenues are generated in
roughly equal proportions from North America, Europe and the rest of the
world. Many of Canada's tech firms, in contrast, rely hugely on the U.S.
market.

Having survived the bust and already rebounding strongly, the future looks
bright for high tech in Israel.

Nevo's office is on the second floor of a glitzy building on the outskirts
of Tel Aviv. It is surrounded by other similar buildings that house dozens
of startups. The neighbourhood is popularly known as Kiryat Atidim, which
translates to "village of the future."

It's an apt affirmation of faith in the country's engineering talent.

Israel's Top Dozen Tech Stars

Company Niche Market value

(US$ millions)*

Teva Pharmaceutical Generic drugs 20,172

Amdocs Billing software 5,410

Check Point Software Internet security 5,400

Comverse Technology IT software/applications 4,683

Partner Communications Mobile communications 1,580

Taro Pharmaceutical Health care products 808

Elbit Systems Defence electronics 953

Koor Industries Telecom gear 933

Lipman Electronic Electronic payment systems 859

ECI Telecom Network solutions 771

Given Imaging Diagnostic systems 764

Syneron Medical Medical products 686

Source: Bloomberg, Market data as of April 25, 2005

Ran with fact box "Israel's top dozen tech stars", which has been appended
to the story.

-----------------------------------------------


Also in this issue:

- Net-powered computer goes on show
   Soon you could be using one less cable to keep your computer running
- Small box 'to end digital divide'
   The boxes mean small companies or cybercafes can set up cheaply. A pared
down "computer"    to replace bulky, grey desktop PCs could help close
global digital inequalities.
- Dealing with a digital underclass
   Net access for all, irrespective of social class or wealth is essential,
says technology    analyst Bill Thompson.
- 'Tiger' roars into stores
   New Mac operating system goes on sale Friday
- My Web 'beta'
   Wednesday, Internet media giant Yahoo Inc injected their News site with
a stylish new look   and features to help users go deeper into subjects and
to personalize headlines. The most   visited online news site in the United
States is aiming for a "cleaner" and more organized   delivery of headlines
and news content, Yahoo said.
- Trojan attack exploits Google typos
   Hackers have set up malicious websites designed to infect the Windows
boxes of surfers who   mistype the name of popular search engine
Google.com. If a user opens one of the malicious   websites, such as
googkle.com1, his PC box may be hijacked with malware including
Trojan    downloaders, backdoors and spyware.
- Microsoft offers peek at new Windows system
   The future of Windows computing will include eye-popping graphics and
powerful new search   capabilities along with security, security and still
more security. Microsoft this week     revealed details of its
next-generation operating system, codenamed Longhorn, which is due   in
late 2006.
- Bahrain Site Registration Sparks Protests
   All Web sites operating in Bahrain must register with the country's
Information Ministry    under a new government mandate that has provoked
protests from an international watchdog    for press freedom.
- Spitzer goes after spyware
   New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer filed a lawsuit Thursday against
Intermix Media,    charging the online marketer with illegally
disseminating spyware programs.
- 9 guilty verdicts in tech sting
   Operation Matrix, a major undercover investigation of stolen computer
hardware and     software in Silicon Valley, recovered $480 million in
property and put nine people behind   bars before finally drawing to a
close with the sentencing of the final two defendants,     law enforcement
officials disclosed this week.
- Pharming Your Identity
   Identity theft is on the rise, and phishing—e-mail scams disguised as
legitimate     correspondence—has risen to epidemic proportions. Now,
phishing's newest mutation, called   "pharming," poses a more insidious threat.
- Rolling Camera Eyeballs Danger
   Imagine being on a SWAT team charged with disarming violent crooks in a
meth lab, and     knowing that every year, more than 50,000 law enforcement
officers are assaulted.
- The Wired 40
   They're masters of technology and innovation. They're global thinkers
driven by strategic   vision. They're nimbler than Martha Stewart's PR
team. They're The Wired 40.
- Will Your PC Be Ready for Longhorn?
   Although Longhorn isn't slated to be available until "holiday 2006,"
some PC users are     already wondering what kinds of PCs will be able to
run the next version of Windows.
- Indian call centres recruit UK backpackers
   UK graduates and backpackers are being employed by UK firms to work in
offshore Indian     call centres on Indian salaries in an attempt to bridge
the culture gap between agents and   customers.
- Israel's tech titans are challenging Canadian entrepreneurs as a global force
   It's a common Hebrew expression: "holech al gadol," which translates
directly to "going     for big." In casual usage, the words describe an
ambitious person but they also apply in a   larger sense to 21st century
Israel. Look just about anywhere in this country -- from the   heart of the
Negev desert in the south to the R&D heartland of Haifa towards the north
--   and you'll see signs of a remarkable economic renaissance anchored by
Israel's role as a    high-tech proving ground.


Member: Association for International Business
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November 1997, Week 1
October 1997, Week 5
October 1997, Week 4
October 1997, Week 3
October 1997, Week 2
October 1997, Week 1
September 1997, Week 5
September 1997, Week 4
September 1997, Week 3
September 1997, Week 2
September 1997, Week 1
August 1997, Week 5
August 1997, Week 4
August 1997, Week 3
August 1997, Week 2
August 1997, Week 1
July 1997, Week 5
July 1997, Week 4
July 1997, Week 3
July 1997, Week 2
July 1997, Week 1
June 1997, Week 5
June 1997, Week 4
June 1997, Week 3
June 1997, Week 2
June 1997, Week 1
May 1997, Week 5
May 1997, Week 4
May 1997, Week 3
May 1997, Week 2
May 1997, Week 1
April 1997, Week 5
April 1997, Week 4
April 1997, Week 3
April 1997, Week 2
April 1997, Week 1
March 1997, Week 6
March 1997, Week 5
March 1997, Week 4
March 1997, Week 3
March 1997, Week 2
March 1997, Week 1
February 1997, Week 5
February 1997, Week 4
February 1997, Week 3
February 1997, Week 2
February 1997, Week 1
January 1997, Week 5
January 1997, Week 4
January 1997, Week 3
January 1997, Week 2
January 1997, Week 1
December 1996, Week 4
December 1996, Week 3
December 1996, Week 2
December 1996, Week 1
November 1996, Week 5
November 1996, Week 4
November 1996, Week 3
November 1996, Week 2
November 1996, Week 1
October 1996, Week 5
October 1996, Week 4
October 1996, Week 3
October 1996, Week 2
October 1996, Week 1
September 1996, Week 5
September 1996, Week 4
September 1996, Week 3
September 1996, Week 2
September 1996, Week 1
August 1996, Week 5
August 1996, Week 4
August 1996, Week 3
August 1996, Week 2
August 1996, Week 1
July 1996, Week 5
July 1996, Week 4
July 1996, Week 3
July 1996, Week 2
July 1996, Week 1
June 1996, Week 5
June 1996, Week 4
June 1996, Week 3
June 1996, Week 2
June 1996, Week 1
May 1996, Week 5
May 1996, Week 4
May 1996, Week 3
May 1996, Week 2
May 1996, Week 1
April 1996, Week 5
April 1996, Week 4
April 1996, Week 3
April 1996, Week 2
April 1996, Week 1
March 1996, Week 6
March 1996, Week 5
March 1996, Week 4
March 1996, Week 3
March 1996, Week 2
March 1996, Week 1
February 1996, Week 5
February 1996, Week 4
February 1996, Week 3
February 1996, Week 2
February 1996, Week 1
January 1996, Week 5
January 1996, Week 4
January 1996, Week 3
January 1996, Week 2
January 1996, Week 1
December 1995, Week 6
December 1995, Week 5
December 1995, Week 4
December 1995, Week 3
December 1995, Week 2
December 1995, Week 1
November 1995, Week 5
November 1995, Week 4
November 1995, Week 3
November 1995, Week 2
November 1995, Week 1
October 1995, Week 5
October 1995, Week 4
October 1995, Week 3
October 1995, Week 2
October 1995, Week 1
October 1995, Week -15
September 1995, Week 5
September 1995, Week 4
September 1995, Week 3
September 1995, Week 2
September 1995, Week 1
August 1995, Week 5
August 1995, Week 4
August 1995, Week 3
August 1995, Week 2
August 1995, Week 1
July 1995, Week 5
July 1995, Week 4
July 1995, Week 3
July 1995, Week 2
July 1995, Week 1
June 1995, Week 5
June 1995, Week 4
June 1995, Week 3
June 1995, Week 2
June 1995, Week 1
May 1995, Week 5
May 1995, Week 4
May 1995, Week 3
May 1995, Week 2
May 1995, Week 1
April 1995, Week 5
April 1995, Week 4
April 1995, Week 3
April 1995, Week 2
April 1995, Week 1
March 1995, Week 5
March 1995, Week 4
March 1995, Week 3
March 1995, Week 2
March 1995, Week 1
February 1995, Week 4
February 1995, Week 3
February 1995, Week 2
February 1995, Week 1
January 1995, Week 5
January 1995, Week 4
January 1995, Week 3
January 1995, Week 2
January 1995, Week 1
December 1994, Week 5
December 1994, Week 4
December 1994, Week 3
December 1994, Week 2
December 1994, Week 1
November 1994, Week 5
November 1994, Week 4
November 1994, Week 3
November 1994, Week 2
November 1994, Week 1
October 1994, Week 5
October 1994, Week 4
October 1994, Week 3
October 1994, Week 2
October 1994, Week 1
September 1994, Week 5
September 1994, Week 4
September 1994, Week 3
September 1994, Week 2
September 1994, Week 1
August 1994, Week 5
August 1994, Week 4
August 1994, Week 3
August 1994, Week 2
August 1994, Week 1
July 1994, Week 5
July 1994, Week 4
July 1994, Week 3
July 1994, Week 2
July 1994, Week 1
June 1994, Week 5
June 1994, Week 4
June 1994, Week 3
June 1994, Week 2
June 1994, Week 1
May 1994, Week 5
May 1994, Week 4
May 1994, Week 3
May 1994, Week 2
May 1994, Week 1
April 1994, Week 5
April 1994, Week 4
April 1994, Week 3
April 1994, Week 2
April 1994, Week 1
March 1994, Week 5
March 1994, Week 4
March 1994, Week 3
March 1994, Week 2
March 1994, Week 1
February 1994, Week 4
February 1994, Week 3
February 1994, Week 2
February 1994, Week 1
January 1994, Week 5
January 1994, Week 4
January 1994, Week 3
January 1994, Week 2
January 1994, Week 1
December 1993, Week 5
December 1993, Week 4
December 1993, Week 3
December 1993, Week 2
December 1993, Week 1
November 1993, Week 5
November 1993, Week 4
November 1993, Week 3
November 1993, Week 2
November 1993, Week 1
October 1993, Week 5
October 1993, Week 4
October 1993, Week 3
October 1993, Week 2
October 1993, Week 1
September 1993, Week 5
September 1993, Week 4
September 1993, Week 3
September 1993, Week 2
September 1993, Week 1
August 1993, Week 5
August 1993, Week 4
August 1993, Week 3
August 1993, Week 2
August 1993, Week 1
July 1993, Week 5
July 1993, Week 4
July 1993, Week 3
July 1993, Week 2
July 1993, Week 1
June 1993, Week 5
June 1993, Week 4
June 1993, Week 3
June 1993, Week 2
June 1993, Week 1
May 1993, Week 5
May 1993, Week 4
May 1993, Week 3
May 1993, Week 2
May 1993, Week 1
April 1993, Week 5
April 1993, Week 4
April 1993, Week 3
April 1993, Week 2
April 1993, Week 1
March 1993, Week 5
March 1993, Week 4
March 1993
February 1993

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