LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for VTBIRD Archives


VTBIRD Archives

VTBIRD Archives


VTBIRD@LIST.UVM.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

VTBIRD Home

VTBIRD Home

VTBIRD  January 2006

VTBIRD January 2006

Subject:

orange feathers

From:

Kent McFarland <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Vermont Birds <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 10 Jan 2006 10:33:56 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (68 lines)

What I have seen
twice, however, is an orange male House Finch.  I have no idea what he is
eating, or where he is eating it, to account for the different coloration.
  Does anyone know if this would have been the result of his summer diet?

Holly-

This is  caused by eating introduced honeysuckle. 
I have seen it on finches, eye line on 
White-throated sparrows (usually yellow), and 
belly feathers of Veery as well as tips on waxwings.

Cedar Waxwings with orange instead of yellow tail 
tips began appearing in the northeastern United 
States and southeastern Canada beginning in the 
1960s. The orange color is the result of a red 
pigment picked up from the berries of an 
introduced species of honeysuckle. If a waxwing 
eats the berries while it is growing a tail 
feather, the tip of the feather will be orange.

 From the Birds of North America account for house finch:

Yellow/orange/red color of feathers results from 
deposition of 3 carotenoid pigments: -carotene, 
which produces yellow to orange color in 
feathers; isocryptoxanthin, which produces orange 
color in feathers; and echinenone, which produces 
red color in feathers (Brush and Power 1976). 
Controlled feeding experiments with captive House 
Finches indicate that all individuals in all 
populations have same potential to be brightly or 
drably plumaged; variation in color of feathers 
reflects differential access to carotenoid 
pigments at the time of molt (Brush and Power 
1976, Hill 1992, in press a, b). Males from 4 
different C. m. frontalis populations (brightly 
plumaged Michigan, California; drably plumaged 
California, Hawaii) responded to standardized 
diets in a similar manner. When they were fed a 
plain seed diet, which was fully nutritious but 
provides few carotenoid pigments, all males grew 
feathers with similar pale yellow coloration 
(Brush and Power 1976, Hill 1992, in press a). On 
a seed diet with -carotene added, all males grew 
pale orange feathers. And, on a seed diet with 
the red carotenoid canthaxanthin added, all males 
grew bright red feathers. Moreover, the variance 
in plumage coloration among males after treatment 
on a standardized diet was significantly lower 
than the variance in appearance among males from 
wild populations (Hill 1992). Female House 
Finches also converged on a similar plumage when 
their access to carotenoid pigments was 
standardized during molt (Hill in press b). 
Although relatively few wild females show 
detectable carotenoid pigmentation (see 
Distinguishing Characteristics), when 
canthaxanthin was added to their diets all 
females showed maximum female expression of 
carotenoids with a red wash on the rump, crown, 
and underside (Hill in press b).

Hope this helps.

Kent McFarland
VINS Biologist 

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

June 2021
May 2021
April 2021
March 2021
February 2021
January 2021
December 2020
November 2020
October 2020
September 2020
August 2020
July 2020
June 2020
May 2020
April 2020
March 2020
February 2020
January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LIST.UVM.EDU

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager