LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for VTBIRD Archives


VTBIRD Archives

VTBIRD Archives


VTBIRD@LIST.UVM.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

VTBIRD Home

VTBIRD Home

VTBIRD  March 2006

VTBIRD March 2006

Subject:

Vermont RBA 3-6-06

From:

Mary Holland <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Vermont Birds <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 6 Mar 2006 15:00:43 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (261 lines)

*Vermont

 

*Statewide

3.6.06

 

*VT0403.06

 

 

This is the Vermont Rare Bird Alert for March 6, 2006 covering the period
February 27 - March 6, 2006.

 

Four TURKEY VULTURES were seen soaring over Brattleboro on March 5th, the
second sighting of this species this season.

 

An adult drake KING EIDER was spotted on the South Hero side of the
Colchester Railroad Causeway on the 5th of March, along with several
REDHEADS, 2 BARROW'S GOLDENEYE and several HOODED MERGANSERS.  A HOODED
MERGANSER was also seen in Charlotte on March 1st.

 

A SHARP-SHINNED HAWK was observed in Milton on February 28th and in Rutland
Town on the 1st of March.  COOPER'S HAWKS were seen in Burlington, Grand
Isle and Bennington this week.  The last sighting of the SNOWY OWL in East
Warren took place on the afternoon of March 5th.  GREAT HORNED OWLS are
nesting near North Springfield Lake.  

 

RED-BELLIED WOODPECKERS were seen in Manchester Center, Pownal and
Bennington this week.

 

A NORTHERN SHRIKE was seen in Waitsfield on February 27th and in East Warren
on March 1st.

 

COMMON RAVENS are adding finishing touches to a nest on the Exit 2 ramp on
Rte. 7 in Bennington.

 

A CAROLINA WREN was seen twice this week in Rutland Town.

 

Eight EASTERN BLUEBIRDS were seen in Danby on March 4th.  AMERICAN ROBINS
were seen in Bennington, White River Junction, Charlotte, Brattleboro,
Norwich and Bristol this week.

 

A NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD was observed in Brattleboro on March 5th.

 

BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS were spotted in Woodstock (12), Bristol (25) and Essex
(200+) this week.

 

The CAPE MAY WARBLER has weathered a Vermont winter and is still visiting
Rutland feeders.

 

Repeated sightings of the SONG SPARROW and WHITE-THROATED SPARROW took place
in Bennington this week.  A WHITE-THROATED SPARROW was also seen in
Brattleboro.  The overwintering CHIPPING SPARROW remains in Shelburne.

 

Last week 27 NORTHERN CARDINALS were seen at one time at various feeders in
one Shelburne location.

 

Three RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDS were spotted in Jericho last week.

 

COMMMON REDPOLLS were sighted in Hardwick, Waitsfield, Rochester, Bristol,
and Jericho during the past week.

 

EVENING GROSBEAKS were seen in Westford, Hardwick, Bristol and Rochester.

 

Thanks to the following contributors and others whose observations were
cited:  Fred Bates, Stephanie Bellomo, Nancy Brown, Stephen Costello, Noel
Dodge, Bonnie Dundas, Susan Elliott, Pat Folsom, Sarah Frey, Richard Harlow,
Julie Hart, Larry Haugh, David Hoag, Bruce MacPherson, Brennan Neill,
Barbara Powers, Hugh and Bunni Putnam, Chris Rimmer,  Mundi Smithers,  Allan
Strong, Christopher Trammel, Henry Trombley and Ron and Norma Wiesen.

 

 

The Vermont Institute of Natural Science offers natural history trips,
lectures and programs.  To receive a copy of our program calendar, stop at
one of our centers, call the office during business hours at 802-457-2779 or
visit the VINS' web site at http://www.vinsweb.org
<http://www.vinsweb.org/>.

 

VINS NATURALIST JOURNEYS - 2nd Annual Slideshow Series

Friday, March 10, 7pm

The Singing Life of Birds: The Art and Science of Listening to Birdsong

With Donald Kroodsma 

Bethany Church, Montpelier

 

            For centuries, the question of why birds sing and what their
songs mean has captured the imagination of scientists, naturalists, and
poets. Author and scientist Donald Kroodsma will answer that question by
taking you on a listening and viewing adventure to understand the hidden
dramas in our backyards. With absorbing detail, he'll put you inside the
mind the research scientist and the singing bird itself, exploring how and
why birds sing and how we can better understand them through their songs. 

            Donald Kroodsma, professor emeritus at the University of
Massachusetts, has studied birdsong for more than thirty years. He has
edited three scholarly volumes on the field of acoustic communication among
birds, and more than one hundred articles in popular magazines such as
Birder's World, Living Bird, and Natural History. In graduate school at
Oregon State, a singing wren in his backyard got Kroodsma started on a
lifelong passion for listening to birds. The Singing Life of Birds is
Kroodsma's first full-length book.

 

 

 

The Singing Life of Birds

A Birdsong Workshop with nationally acclaimed author Donald Kroodsma

Saturday, March 11, 7am - 11am

VINS North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier

Fee: $30 member, $35 nonmember

Pre-registration required

 

Why do birds sing? And what do their songs mean? University of Massachusetts
professor Donald Kroodsma has been researching birds and birdsongs for over
thirty years. Author of dozens of articles in Birder's World, Living Bird
and Natural History, he recently published The Singing Life of Birds, his
first full length book. He'll be presenting a slideshow and discussion of
his research on March 10th at the Bethany Church in Montpelier. Join us the
following morning for a fascinating, first hand exploration of bird song.
Participants will improve their listening skills, learn the basics of sound
recording, and learn how to "see" and analyze birdsongs, primarily with
Cornell's Raven-lite software. Participants will spend time outside,
listening for and recording bird calls. After those early morning hours in
the field, we'll use an indoor session to talk farther about recording
techniques and also to study sounds that we have recorded or sounds that we
can upload from published CDs. This workshop experience will change forever
the way you listen to bird song. See http://www.TheSingingLifeOfBirds.com/
for more information.

            This Vermont birding report is a service of the Vermont
Institute of Natural Science.  VINS is a non-profit, membership organization
located in Woodstock with regional centers in Quechee, Montpelier and
Manchester.  Founded in 1972, VINS' mission is to protect our natural
heritage through education and research. Your membership supports these
goals and this reporting service.  Updates are typically made on Fridays.
Please report your sightings of rare or

unusual birds to VINS, or email reports to [log in to unmask]

 

            If you have any interesting birds to report, you can send your
sightings to the RBA via e-mail at:  [log in to unmask]  Or enter your
sightings on Vermont eBird at http://www.ebird.org/VINS/.

 

 Mary Holland

 

Chris Rimmer

 

Kent McFarland

 

Roz Renfrew

 

Vermont RBA Compilers

 

Vermont Institute of Natural Science

 

Conservation Biology Department

 

27023 Church Hill Road

 

Woodstock, VT  05091 

 

802-457-2779

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LIST.UVM.EDU

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager