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COMMUNET  April 2006, Week 2

COMMUNET April 2006, Week 2

Subject:

Re: [Post-Careerist] when bad things happen to good people, every day

From:

"W. Curtiss Priest" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Community and Civic Network discussion list <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 10 Apr 2006 18:59:50 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (335 lines)

Dear Alice (on the Post-Careerist list),

It was Oscar Wilde who said, "only dumb people are
bright at breakfast."  I have a card, with that
quotation, under a magnet on the refrigerator.

As a behavioral scientist, I have two comments.  Also,
you might wish to read a talk I presented last month
about using behavioral science to understand problems
of poverty:

	http://www.naturalism.org/priest.htm

1.  I say, with a high level of belief, but without
scientifically verifying this, that REM/dream sleep is
critical to integrating our experiences into the neural
networks of the brain (aka mind).

I believe that, while we go about our day's activities, what
we are actually doing is scavenging material for our dreams.

One can even, in an existential way, suggest that our
"real world" is experienced during dream sleep, and that
what we do during the day is incidental but quite important
for our dream sleep.  I say this with some humor, but, who
is to say that the states we are mostly conscious of, are
the more important states of who we are?

Returning to Wilde, and thinking in terms of larks and
owls, people who find much to grapple with, during the
day, are in high scavenging mode.  These people take in
far too much material, and, they place a hugh demand on
the REM/dreaming periods (typically 5 or 6), and, as the
fifth period occurs from 5AM to 7AM if you begin sleep
at 10PM, one is engaged in two full hours of scavenging-
driven work of reconstructing associations and connections
at this time.  Now, as the metabolic low for most people
occurs at 4AM, what we see is a prescription for awakening,
exhausted.

2.  Now, lets add yet a further complication.  In addition
to the metabolic low, each REM period is accompanied by
the action of the hypothalmous to paralyze most of our
body for the entire extent and length of REM sleep.  Such
paralysis is necessary, less our limbs and bodies wish to
act out the material being sorted over and the obscure
visions we have of being "active" in our dreams.  These
visions are not obscure because they are not vivid, but, they
are obscure as our consciousness is mostly absent.  Thus the
reason we only recollect pieces of dreams -- there are moments when
we move from REM to consciousness, where the dream content
is latent in our minds.

Over the last thirty years, various sleep disorders have
been recognized, and some well treated.  These disorders
are mostly unwanted interruptions in breathing, but other
disorders result from the hypothalmus' failure to fully
paralyze our muscles.

And, of the disorders that interrupt breathing (called apneas),
these occur when lack of upper airway muscle tone causes
tissues to occlude, but, they are also produced by the
lack of proper signal to the active parts of our breathing:
1.)  the epiglottis (which must open), 2.)  the glottis (which
we must open), 3.)  and the diaphram, which must draw down to
expand our lungs.

Now, take a person who both does an enormous amount of
daytime scavenging and have that same person experience
apneas they experience states where oxygen deprivation and
CO2 aggravation can actually turn vivid dreams into dark,
distorted dreams).

This is a very good way to produce insanity.  Particularly,
apneas of the "central type" (i.e., failures of #1, #2 and/or
#3) almost invariably occur in REM, and so, the person
is being systematically suffocated at the times when the
brain wants to do a great amount of work on all that
scavenged material.

So.  When I read your story, I sense you are quite likely
an "owl" -- but -- further -- if sleep does not refresh you --
it is extremely important to check for apneas.

One does not need a sleep lab study to get a preliminary
notion.  With a $2 microphone for a PC and a VCR and an
8 hour tape (on EP -- extended long play), and holding the
tiny electret microphone (very small when removed from
the microphone holder), one can record several nights, and
listen for any breathing cessations and/or any abrupt
sounds of gasping.

This is extremely important to do.  Doing this for myself,
now, 26 years ago, I caught one sleep related problem
responsible for harsh mornings.

So, Alice, I hope you do this, as, while the only way
I know to give relief for scavenging exhaustion is to
dumb down one's conscious/awake days, there are solutions
for various forms of apneas.

P.S.  Two design notes for the electret microphone:

1.  These microphones receive power, typically from
the sound card/plug of the PC.  To use them separately,
get these from Radio Shack:

	a.  One 3 V lithium battery and clip holder
	b.  One .1 microfared (ufd) capacitor
	c.  One 10K (ohm) resistor
	c.  One sound patch cord, clip leads to an RCA
		phono plug
	d.  One package of "clip leads"
	e.  You may still be able to get an electret
		microphone from Radio Shack (their part
		270-090, $1.99, (2001 catalogue) )

Tell your (friendly) Radio Shack person you want this circuit:

(if the lines don't line up in this e-mail, copy and paste
into wordpad, and change the font to Courier, then print)

                    USING VCR AS 8 HR. SOUND RECORDER

(the carat should point to the "C" in RECORDER ^          )

       _______>____________________> [.1 capacitor] ___   -- shell
      |                          \                     |_____center 
\_____|                          / 10 K resistor
        <lithium battery>(+ side)\                     |>-- shell
/----->----------------------------------------------->|    
        (- side)
Electret microphone                              (male)RCA phono plug
                                  (into left or right VCR, "audio in")

This diagram is for a 2 wire electret microphone where
power is on the same (usually red wire) as the sound.

By attaching the battery across the red wire (plus), and
black wire(minus), the microphone has power.  To keep
the VCR from seeing the +3 volts, the capacitor only
lets sound, not the 3 volts, through to the inner pin of
the RCA phone plug.  The 10K resistor provides +3 volts to the
microphone without shorting out the sound.

The black wire side connects to the battery (minus) and
continues to connect to the "shell" of the phono plug.
When not in use, pop the battery from its clip to keep
the battery fresh.  Always do a test.  Put in a tape
and press REC.  Make low level, intermittent hisses
into the microphone for a few seconds, rewind, and play back.

And, do not have the VCR plugged into an antenna or cable box, so
it won't record from that source.  The VCR should "throw
up" a blue screen, and "audio in" should record (see this
discussion:

http://groups.google.com/group/alt.video.vcr/browse_thread/thread/147bf4bd626ee49c/109baa13b01a3160?lnk=st&q=vcr+for+recording+sound&rnum=3&hl=en#109baa13b01a3160
)

However, earlier VCRs do not do blue screens -- they just show
noise.  So, in that case, and it is also handy, follow the
suggestion of Ian (from above):

"Hi-fi vcr's need a video signal to be recorded along with
the audio. I prefer using a cable channel that has a
continually running clock such as a menu channel."

To do this, do not connect to a cable box using the cables
that screw on (F7).  Rather, most cable boxes also have video
out via the RCA phono plug in the back.  So, to provide both
time information, and to convince the VCR to listen to the
"audio in" -- get one male to male RCA phono patch cord, and
take only the video from the cable box (set to a station with
time) and then connect your microphone into either left or right audio
in on the VCR.  (What if your cable box isn't in the bed room?
Distance really doesn't matter.  Radio Shack has a 50 foot
patch cord (42-2480) you could use for the video.  Or, take
2 x 24 foot (42-2478) and use a female-female connector (274-1553
or 274-863) to get 48 feet.  Etc.

Some VCRs offer different audio connectors on the front
panel, those, too, could be used.  But, the RCA phone plugs
on the back are universal.  Do be sure to plug to Audio (and
Video if wanted, or necessary) "In," not "Out."


2.  If you are one of the 90+ percent of the population with
the obstructive form of sleep apnea, simply using surgical tape, you
can let the microphone dangle by your nose.  However, if you
have central apneas, these events can be extremely quiet.  Also,
if you are a "mouth breather," a microphone by your nose
may miss events.  In a sleep lab, the movement of air is often
detected by placing a temperature sensitive device under the
nose, and another, by the lips.  Air motion changes the device's
temperature and thus shows breathing.

In 1982 I thought about this problem and I borrowed a "full
face oxygen mask," and I took a punch (available from a
woodworker supply store), and I put a cluster of small 1/8"
holes -- about 15 -- and placed the microphone up to that.
Then, any airflow went through those holes, the sound of air
through little holes is audible, and the microphone
becomes extremely informative.  (And, my cessations WERE very quiet.)

As it requires, in the US, a doctor's prescription for even
such an oxygen mask, I suggest going to a party store, finding
some comfortable rubber mask for, say, halloween, trim it so
that it covers the nose and mouth (if it has a mouth opening --
tape that shut), then put in the 10-15 holes for the microphone.
When done well, you will not feel that your breathing is
constricted, but, it will be EXtremely well monitored.  (As
full face masks are one of the treatments for obstructive
apneas, every night!, do not let one or two nights of this
alarm you.  And, without the $2000 expenditure for a sleep
lab study, you might well find out why mornings are more
miserable than just due to scavenging.

Note:  W. Curtiss Priest, Ph.D. is a scientist and engineer,
and is not licensed to practise medicine.  The information
conveyed here describes a "do-it-yourself" approach to possible
sleep disorders.  If you believe, upon reviewing the tape,
that you have periods where breathing stops, for more than
10 seconds, please consult a medical physician.

	:)

Curtiss

Alice Flynn wrote:
> 
> Your message was timely for me.  I recently heard a
> poem
> on the Writer's Almanac, Garrison Keillor's voice
> trumpeting
> how great the morning is, the poem telling me it is
> good
> to experience running around in bare feet in the
> morning
> sun, buzzing on espresso.... I stopped in my mental
> tracks.
> 
> Wow. Over fifty years of hating to wake up in the
> morning,
> coming out of slumber and thinking, "Oh, crap, I have
> to get up,
> it's morning" - it has never been easy for me to greet
> the day
> and feel cheerful about it.
> 
> Decades of situational depression finally culminated a
> few years
> ago with wishing I'd never wake up.  My parents killed
> when I was young,
> a violent boyfriend, still-birth of my twin girls,
> blood clot in my leg, having a
> baby while single and raising him alone, on and on....
> 
> parenting a teenager was the
> last straw that sent me to the doctor for
> antidepressants for this
> constant thinking of death's release.  I tried more
> than one type and did get
> recovery from depression.  I didn't become a "morning
> person".
> 
> Now, as an artist struggling to be the sole support of
> myself and my son,
> I've taken a job in outside sales, calling on all
> kinds of businesses to
> promote themselves with advertising, (phonedir.com)
> applying my designs skills on the
> job in designing their ad layouts, selling ad space.
> Three months into the job, I'm
> good at it, for a shy person, but not naturally
> motivated to go out there
> and deal with the possible rejection every day.  I
> have hundreds of leads
> I still need to call on before the publication
> deadline.  And then there is that
> morning thing....
> 
> As with most people my age, I can't sleep in like a
> youngster any more.
> My mind pops open from 5 to 6 am.  I get my coffee,
> turn on National
> Public Radio, and fire up the iMac to check my email
> and read the news.
> My lifelong habit, though, is to still be feeling,
> "Crap, it's morning and
> I have to get up."
> 
> So, when I heard that poem on the radio a few days
> ago, I said, "That's it!"
> That will be my way to reprogram my thinking about the
> morning, to get
> my mind in gear to go out and feel good right away
> about the possible successes
> of the day.
> 
> I now think about how the sunshine is new, spring,
> days here in Montana
> getting longer.  The Morning is like spring, no matter
> what time of year, with
> the light stretching out for hours ahead, plenty of
> time for work and possibilities,
> opportunities, TIME, which I don't have at bedtime.  I
> am thinking of that
> poem when I wake up now, turning off the automatic
> "crap, it's morning" and
> re-training to think, "wow, it's possibility time!"
> 
> Alice Flynn
> http://www.aliceflynn.com
> 
> W. Curtiss Priest wrote:
> 
> > Hi,
> >
> > As you know there are thousands of self-help books.
> > One of them is to console a good person when
> > something
> > bad happens.  "When Bad Things Happen to Good
> > People" by
> > Harold Kushner.

-- 


	   W. Curtiss Priest, Director, CITS
   Research Affiliate, Comparative Media Studies, MIT
      Center for Information, Technology & Society
         466 Pleasant St., Melrose, MA  02176
   781-662-4044  [log in to unmask] http://Cybertrails.org

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October 1996, Week 1
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September 1996, Week 3
September 1996, Week 2
September 1996, Week 1
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August 1996, Week 1
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July 1996, Week 4
July 1996, Week 3
July 1996, Week 2
July 1996, Week 1
June 1996, Week 5
June 1996, Week 4
June 1996, Week 3
June 1996, Week 2
June 1996, Week 1
May 1996, Week 5
May 1996, Week 4
May 1996, Week 3
May 1996, Week 2
May 1996, Week 1
April 1996, Week 5
April 1996, Week 4
April 1996, Week 3
April 1996, Week 2
April 1996, Week 1
March 1996, Week 6
March 1996, Week 5
March 1996, Week 4
March 1996, Week 3
March 1996, Week 2
March 1996, Week 1
February 1996, Week 5
February 1996, Week 4
February 1996, Week 3
February 1996, Week 2
February 1996, Week 1
January 1996, Week 5
January 1996, Week 4
January 1996, Week 3
January 1996, Week 2
January 1996, Week 1
December 1995, Week 6
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November 1995, Week 1
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October 1995, Week 2
October 1995, Week 1
October 1995, Week -15
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July 1995, Week 3
July 1995, Week 2
July 1995, Week 1
June 1995, Week 5
June 1995, Week 4
June 1995, Week 3
June 1995, Week 2
June 1995, Week 1
May 1995, Week 5
May 1995, Week 4
May 1995, Week 3
May 1995, Week 2
May 1995, Week 1
April 1995, Week 5
April 1995, Week 4
April 1995, Week 3
April 1995, Week 2
April 1995, Week 1
March 1995, Week 5
March 1995, Week 4
March 1995, Week 3
March 1995, Week 2
March 1995, Week 1
February 1995, Week 4
February 1995, Week 3
February 1995, Week 2
February 1995, Week 1
January 1995, Week 5
January 1995, Week 4
January 1995, Week 3
January 1995, Week 2
January 1995, Week 1
December 1994, Week 5
December 1994, Week 4
December 1994, Week 3
December 1994, Week 2
December 1994, Week 1
November 1994, Week 5
November 1994, Week 4
November 1994, Week 3
November 1994, Week 2
November 1994, Week 1
October 1994, Week 5
October 1994, Week 4
October 1994, Week 3
October 1994, Week 2
October 1994, Week 1
September 1994, Week 5
September 1994, Week 4
September 1994, Week 3
September 1994, Week 2
September 1994, Week 1
August 1994, Week 5
August 1994, Week 4
August 1994, Week 3
August 1994, Week 2
August 1994, Week 1
July 1994, Week 5
July 1994, Week 4
July 1994, Week 3
July 1994, Week 2
July 1994, Week 1
June 1994, Week 5
June 1994, Week 4
June 1994, Week 3
June 1994, Week 2
June 1994, Week 1
May 1994, Week 5
May 1994, Week 4
May 1994, Week 3
May 1994, Week 2
May 1994, Week 1
April 1994, Week 5
April 1994, Week 4
April 1994, Week 3
April 1994, Week 2
April 1994, Week 1
March 1994, Week 5
March 1994, Week 4
March 1994, Week 3
March 1994, Week 2
March 1994, Week 1
February 1994, Week 4
February 1994, Week 3
February 1994, Week 2
February 1994, Week 1
January 1994, Week 5
January 1994, Week 4
January 1994, Week 3
January 1994, Week 2
January 1994, Week 1
December 1993, Week 5
December 1993, Week 4
December 1993, Week 3
December 1993, Week 2
December 1993, Week 1
November 1993, Week 5
November 1993, Week 4
November 1993, Week 3
November 1993, Week 2
November 1993, Week 1
October 1993, Week 5
October 1993, Week 4
October 1993, Week 3
October 1993, Week 2
October 1993, Week 1
September 1993, Week 5
September 1993, Week 4
September 1993, Week 3
September 1993, Week 2
September 1993, Week 1
August 1993, Week 5
August 1993, Week 4
August 1993, Week 3
August 1993, Week 2
August 1993, Week 1
July 1993, Week 5
July 1993, Week 4
July 1993, Week 3
July 1993, Week 2
July 1993, Week 1
June 1993, Week 5
June 1993, Week 4
June 1993, Week 3
June 1993, Week 2
June 1993, Week 1
May 1993, Week 5
May 1993, Week 4
May 1993, Week 3
May 1993, Week 2
May 1993, Week 1
April 1993, Week 5
April 1993, Week 4
April 1993, Week 3
April 1993, Week 2
April 1993, Week 1
March 1993, Week 5
March 1993, Week 4
March 1993
February 1993

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