LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for VTBIRD Archives


VTBIRD Archives

VTBIRD Archives


VTBIRD@LIST.UVM.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

VTBIRD Home

VTBIRD Home

VTBIRD  November 2006

VTBIRD November 2006

Subject:

Re: avoiding seasickness

From:

Elizabeth Alton <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Vermont Birds <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sun, 12 Nov 2006 06:01:05 EST

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (70 lines)

 
I too am very prone to Sea Sickness. I agree with what everyone is saying.  I 
definitely have to watch the horizon, but I find an open area closest to the  
middle of the boat, is the most stable. 
 
I also have electronic wrist bands that electronically pulse the  acupuncture 
point on the wrist that helps avoid Sea Sickness. You can increase  the pulse 
depending on how bad the conditions are and how you feel. These work  very 
well. I got mine from Sharper Image. I heard about them from my Uncle who  was 
taking a trip with his girlfriend on the QEII. The friend always gets  
sick...they both had them. The ship had to steer around a hurricane on the trip.  He 
said that everyone on the whole ship was sick, scapolemine (sp) patches were  
not working, nothing was working except the bands my uncle  had. They took off 
their bands for a short time, immediately started  to feel sick, put them back 
on and felt better again. The ship's Dr. took down  all the information about 
them. I have used mine since and have had really good  luck. Liz Alton, 
Georgia, VT
 
In a message dated 11/8/2006 10:39:04 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
[log in to unmask] writes:

I'm  prone to seasickness, so I've read as much as I can on the subject. 
Turns out NASA has studied it extensively because space sickness is 
the  same thing, and they've found out one really interesting thing.  I  
read that what happens is that when your inner ear is getting really  
stressed by all the heaving around, your stomach basically goes into  
fibrillation, falling out of its normal steady, regular rhythm and  
getting wildly irregular.  According to NASA, it's far less likely to  do 
that if it's got something to work on, ie food. Best is something  simple 
to digest-- low fat, low protein, low acid.

I've found that  if I make sure to have something in my stomach when I 
get on the boat  before it gets moving and keep nibbling throughout the 
voyage, I do much,  much, much better.  I like saltines, so I bring a 
good-sized bag of  them and just munch away.  That's really made a huge 
difference for  me.

Supposedly, what causes the problem is the contradiction between  what 
your inner ear is sensing about the motion of your body and what your  
eyes are seeing, so you want to minimize that contrast.  So stay on  
deck.  I think the bow is far better than the stern, too, largely  
because of the fumes but also because when you see where you're going,  
it's somehow easier for your brain to deal with the bouncing up and  
down.  And the cold fresh air battering my face also somehow  contributes 
to keeping me on an even keel, so to speak...

If you do  start to feel a little queasy, the very worst thing you can do 
is what we  instinctively want to do, which is lie down or sit down and 
bury your head  in your arms, or go below where you can't see the 
horizon.  If you do  that, you're guaranteed to get actively sick.

I also take Dramamine (if  that makes you too sleepy, there's another 
similar over-the-counter one  that I think is called Bonine, which is 
less of a problem for some  people), and I use those little wristbands 
you can get in the drugstore  with little plastic nobs that push gently 
on a pressure point in your  wrist that's supposed to help.  I have NOT 
experimented to find out  if this really does help or not. :-)

The problem with pelagic birding  is, though, when you look through binos 
at a bird on the water or in the  air, you're creating a really big 
contrast between your body heaving up  and down and your eyes seeing a 
relatively steady image.  So far,  I've not found any amount of Saltines 
or Dramamine or anything else that  will let me use my binoculars on a 
heaving boat for more than quick  glimpses without starting to get into
trouble.  So the world of  fulmars and shearwaters and the like is pretty 
much closed to me, unless  somebody offers a pelagic on something the 
size of the Queen  Elizabeth...

Jane

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LIST.UVM.EDU

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager