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COMMUNET  April 2007, Week 2

COMMUNET April 2007, Week 2

Subject:

"Should Study of the Destruction of American Society Remain a Fringe Activity" [CITS Media Watch #128]

From:

"W. Curtiss Priest" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Community and Civic Network discussion list <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 11 Apr 2007 19:16:43 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (390 lines)

**                                                              **
		     W. Curtiss Priest, Ph.D.
	  Center for Information, Technology & Society
	      466 Pleasant Street Melrose, MA  02176
  E-mail: [log in to unmask], Voice: 781-662-4044, FAX: 781-662-6882


			 April 11, 2007

			Public Issue #128:

			 CITS MEDIA WATCH

	"Should Study of the Destruction of American Society
		    Remain a Fringe Activity"

	Commentary by Dr. W. Curtiss Priest, Director:

Last month I read "Souls of the new machine: How our reliance on
the online universe can endanger the vital tool of narrative"
by Gail Caldwell (Boston Globe, March 18, 2007).  Ms. Caldwell
is a skillful writer but I could watch her flounder as she
grasped for good argument to express her concerns.

I thought about her problem and I wrote an op-ed piece and
submitted it to the Boston Globe.  You can read my submission:

    http://cybertrails.org/MED_the narrative_Gail Caldwell.doc

Ms. Caldwell's article is available here:

http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2007/03/18/souls_of_the_new_machine

Under the impression that one of the purposes of the Comparative
Media Program (CMS) at MIT was to help come to the aid of people who
were interested and concerned about new media, I asked a colleague
in CMS if he would like to co-author the submission.  I genuinely wished
to work more with him and thought that if I presented my thoughts,
he might add his outlook for a stronger submission.  But, this colleague
expressed suspicion and said no thank you.  I was sorry to miss the
opportunity to turn this into something better, and submitted it.

And, I am unsure whether the Boston Globe is interested in having
a humanist/scientist/engineer coming to the aid of one of their
writers.  Why unsure?

Only recently was there a mild debate in the Globe where James
Carroll wrote "The many forms of fundamentalism (March 19, 2007)"
and Ms. Karin J. Lauria, a grad student of theology and ethics
at Boston University School of Theology, wrote a response to
Carroll's essay titled "Cartesian anxiety (March 20, 2007, p. A6).
Ms. Lauria's fascinating response can be read at:

http://www.boston.com/news/globe/editorial_opinion/letters/articles/2007/03/20/cartesian_anxiety/

and I have placed a copy below for commentary.

Ms. Lauria studies at the very institution where some thoughtful
professors in the department of philosophy produce the book,
"Personality and the Good," which I reference in my Globe
submission.  Ms. Lauria proceeds to describe a crippled
form of science referred to as "Cartesian anxiety" and yet she
wishes to do away with various fundamentalisms.  (I've tried
to have a discussion, but, the BU online search system is not
cooperating, I've corresponded with "[log in to unmask]")  To me, she
has almost "got it" but somehow seems to believe that values
are not "facts."

But how can values, which manifest themselves in various
strengths, by various persons or parties, not be factual?
Russell Ackoff would quickly dispatch this confusion by
simply observing how those values propel actors, or not, and
determine their intensity.  And, if a held value in no way
manifests itself in any action, then it is as if it doesn't
exist, and there is no need to be aware of it.  [I am not
saying that some internal state of mind that never manifests
itself in anything externally, whether, say, quickening of
the heart beat when thought of, or secretion of endorphins,
might not exist, but, if it plays such a small role in the
actions (and reactions) of someone, we need not put that
"value" high on our list of concerns.]

Recently I have become not only concerned about media
running amuck, say in my American Law Review article
"Media Concentration:  A Case of Power, Ego, and Greed
Confronting Our Sensibilities (February, 2004, p. 635-643)"
but I have been increasingly concerned about the growth
of so-called information and knowledge.  What I see is
an increasing amount of repetition on the Internet and
in books; what Ross Ashby would call "variety" that
arises out of the combination of (simple) effects.

And, I worry about children that are increasing told that
knowledge is growing exponentially and you'll never be
able to keep up.  ohmi  This is a terrible message to our
children.  Are we saying that even our brighter learners
cannot "know the world" as wholly and fully as did the
Greeks?  As a child I was always fascinated when some of the
early scholars such as Socrates or da Vinci were described
in an Encyclopedia.  A "modern" Encyclopedia, written in a world
riddled by separate disciplines, had to list field after
field, from philosophy, to medicine, to science, to describe
these versatile thinkers.  And, when I grew up I discovered
that if I distinguished significant knowledge from data, I
too could be versatile.  This was always a message I would
convey to my students.

A friendly colleague recently challenged me about this and
caused me to write a short article on "Knowledge Simplicity."
You might wish to read it:

    http://www.elearningspace.org/objsi496.doc

So, I see promises and issues at various levels having to
do with media and content.

And so does Benjamin R. Barber, Gershon and Carol Kekst Professor
of Civil Society and Distinguished University Professor at the
University of Maryland.  His most recent book, "Consumed,"
lashes out at the ills of consumer capitalism and how media
and other forces produce "induced childishness" in our adults.
(As access to the New York Times article requires subscription,
I include it below.)

When I first read that Barbar held an endowed chair I felt
envy.  I am certain that I am not destined for an endowed chair
at MIT.  (Heck, I often wonder if this Institute wants
my help in educating our students, reaching out to the Boston
Globe, or challenging some of its full professors.)

Barbar tells us the result of "Gimme" is "radical consumerist
society."  And, our newer forms of media is all about consuming
rather than understanding.  Having conceived of various ways
the "Internet" would help achieve HG Wells' wish to ward off
catastrophe by bringing about education ("World Brain," 1938)
I have seen only modest progress, some by my own hands, see, e.g.,

    http://www.eLsMath.org

where learners can be guided to over 5000 web-based resources
on math and science, create a learning plan, and in a "learning
loop" use diagnostic tools to determine their weaknesses, and
be guided to those resources that might help them improve.

So, as I cited in a recent CITS Media Watch Alert, one writer
was concerned how the use of song, which is typically a social
activity, has been changed, by new media, to the iPod which
now creates anti-social behavior.

At the heart of the matter, it is difficult for a society to
pass precious values from generation to generation when each
generation, armed with new technologies and media, can ignore
generational messages in favor of newly created ones.  Indeed,
some in CMS were offended when the Media Lab professed to
delve into culture.  But, that attitude is one of neutrality --
a neutrality that could destroy civilization.

So, let me leave with the question:

	"Should Study of the Destruction of American Society
		    Remain a Fringe Activity"

Regards,

W. Curtiss Priest, Ph.D.
Editor
**********************************************************************

Previous issues of the CITS MEDIA WATCH:
    http://groups.google.com/groups?q=cits+media+watch

Other publications by CITS:

    CITS Net Watch
    CITS Capital & Dept Watch
**********************************************************************
NOTICE: Contains copyrighted material, do not redistribute unless you
abide to the copyright notice appearing at the end of this article.

As provided for under Section 107 of the 1976 Copyright Law, the
following piece is being distributed for non-profit purposes and for
comment, criticism, and teaching.  In cases where the purpose of
conveying information is to fully inform the reader, an entire entry
or article is reproduced.  However, these extracts are typically a
very small percentage of the overall original work or publication.

Should you wish to convey this material, in the same spirit, you are
free to do so.

****************************Advertisement*****************************
Subscriptions to the Boston Globe are available at 617-929-2000 Boston
Globe archives are available for a fee at www.bostonglobe.com
****************************Advertisement*****************************

March 20, 2007, p. A6
Letter to the Editor

Cartesian anxiety

I wish James Carroll had mentioned that closely connected
to religious fundamentalism is scientific fundamentalism
("The many forms of fundamentalism," Op-ed, March 19).  One of
its key feature is what philosophers know as Cartesian anxiety,
or the belief that science must provide a certain foundation
of knowledge lest society spiral into intellectual chaos.

It is rooted, of course, in the work of Rene['] Descartes, whose
philosophy, far from being developed in a historical vacuum, was
shaped by the religious and political conflicts of the Thirty
Years' War.  Add to that the earlier upheaval by Galileo of
beliefs about the solar system, and you had what must have
seemed to Descartes to be a world gone mad.

It is true, as Mr. Carroll writes, that the Enlightenment
project is beginning to question itself.  But the evidence
of Cartesian anxiety is still rampant.  It commonly comes
in the form of belief in objective facts and in remarks such
as "that's just reality."  But facts are always interpreted
and reality is always informed by values.  If only we could
accept that life cannot be made simple no matter how much
we want it to be, fundamentalisms might finally disappear.

Karin J. Lauria
Marlborough

The writer is a graduate student of theology and ethics
at Boston University School of Theology.

****************************Advertisement*****************************
    Subscriptions to the New York Times are available at--
http://www.nytimes.com/products/timesselect/overview.html?incamp=ts:toolbar_trial
****************************Advertisement*****************************

April 8, 2007 Sunday Late Edition - Final
SECTION: Section 7; Column 2; Book Review Desk; Pg. 15
LENGTH: 943 words
HEADLINE: Proceed to Checkout
BYLINE: By PAMELA PAUL.

Pamela Paul is a frequent contributor to the Book Review and the
author, most recently, of "Pornified." Her next book will be about the
business behind child rearing.

CONSUMED

How Markets Corrupt Children, Infantilize

Adults, and Swallow Citizens Whole.

By Benjamin R. Barber.

406 pp. W. W. Norton & Company. $26.95.

In the aftermath of Sept. 11, when publishers scrambled to provide
explanations for the attacks, Benjamin R. Barber's 1995 book, "Jihad
vs. McWorld," an examination of the tensions between consumer
capitalism and religious fundamentalism, was dusted off, rushed back
to press and propelled to best-sellerdom. Around that time, Barber
also released a memoir of his stint as a freelance intellectual in the
Clinton White House, a melancholy rumination on the failures of that
administration as well as his own failure to be named chairman of the
National Endowment for the Humanities. With his latest book, Barber, a
political theorist at the University of Maryland, returns to familiar
territory. But if "Jihad" provided an answer to the ubiquitous
post-9/11 question "Why do they hate us?," the question behind
"Consumed" seems to be "Who wouldn't?" 

Barber, for one, is put off by much of what global capitalism has
wrought. Hollywood movies are cartoonish and trashy; kids reared on
video games and fast food miss out on childhood's meaningful
pleasures; life at the mall is soulless; much of popular culture is
dreck. How all this came about takes up the bulk of his book.

According to Barber, global inequality has left the planet with two
kinds of potential customers: the poor of the undeveloped world, with
vast and unserved needs but not the means to fulfill them, and the
first-world rich, who have scads of disposable income but few real
needs. While an earlier capitalist economy, backed by a Protestant
ethos, was built around selling goods like timber and buckwheat that
served people's needs, today's consumerist economy sustains
profitability by creating needs, convincing us that Wiis and iPhones
are necessary. It has done so by promoting what Barber calls an ethos
of infantilization, a mind-set of "induced childishness" in which
adults pursue adolescent lifestyles, as evidenced by their tastes and
spending habits. In other words, in order to sell superfluous stuff,
the market must foster a permanent mentality of "Gimme" and "I want it
now!"

The resultant "radical consumerist society" has set capitalism and
democracy against each other, undermining both. Capitalism, Barber
writes, "seems quite literally to be consuming itself, leaving
democracy in peril and the fate of citizens uncertain." Children's
lives are reduced to shopping excursions in which their identities are
subsumed by brands -- they're the Nike generation, Abercrombie kids,
iPod addicts. Meanwhile, the grown-ups have become so focused on the
private "me" sphere, they've withdrawn from the public "we." Our
political culture compounds this by elevating the private sector over
the public, encouraging Americans to believe that anything the
government can do, private enterprise can do better (for example,
prisons-for-profit are preferable to those run by the state,
mercenaries trump the Marines, and so on). Left unchecked, Barber
warns, "infantilization will undo not only democracy but capitalism
itself."

If this sounds like a bit of a stretch and a lot of muddle, it is.
Yes, marketers target children. Yes, consumer capitalism infantilizes
adults. Yes, the private sector is overvalued. All this is scary.

[The reviewer's further concerns about whether Barbar presents
enough information to become a 400 page book, continues.]

GRAPHIC: Drawing (Drawing by Helene Silverman)

******************************************************************
Copyright Notice:

This article is protected under copyright law. The right to
disseminate this article is also protected under copyright law.

The copyright law permits copying of materials for personal use under
the protection of fair use.

The copyright law also permits the copying of recent materials for the
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Also, the courts generally interpret copyright protection by economic
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if the copying doesn't effect or increases the revenues, the court
usually decides on behalf of the defendent.

It is our judgment that occasional copying of a newspaper article does
not reduce revenues to the publisher and can actually create more
demand for a newspaper by attracting readership. An excerpt provides
free advertising for the publisher.

Thus, under fair use, teachable moment, and economic criteria we
selectively convey this copyrighted material to others.

*********

On October 27th, 1998, a new law called The Digital Millennium
Copyright Act was signed (Public Law 105-298).  A copy of the law is
available from the Government Printing Office at:

    http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/useftp.cgi
    ?IPaddress=wais.access.gpo.gov&filename=publ304.105
    &directory=/diskb/wais/data/105_cong_public_laws

This law helps bring the U.S. into uniformity with the World
Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) treaty.

While a lengthy law, it's main orientation is towards "stored
copyrighted materials" and supports the right for libraries and
archives to contain copyrighted materials for non-commercial purposes.
There is a procedure outlined by which a publisher may ask that
material be removed from an archive, but there are no liabilities on
the part of the archive site for the storage of copyrighted materials.
There is a requirement which every archive site should meet (including
the owners of list servers) to provide contact information to the U.S.
Copyright Office of a "designated agent" -- a person whom a copyright
holder can contact.

Further, the Act provides the "subscriber" with certain rights with
respect to maintaining materials with the archive service provider.
In particular, if materials are removed from a site, the subscriber
may notify the archive service with a "counter notification" which
explains why the subscriber believes the material has been removed by
mistake.

This language clearly recognizes the subscriber's 1st Amendment rights
for free speech and provides a remedy should the subscriber believe
his/her free speech rights are being abridged.

It is our opinion that it is extremely unlikely that a copyright
holder will ever contact an archive site's designated agent when
language, as we use, is provided to indicate the "fair use" aspect of
its dissemination and storage.

**********************************************************************

-- 


	   W. Curtiss Priest, Director, CITS
   Research Affiliate, Comparative Media Studies, MIT
      Center for Information, Technology & Society
         466 Pleasant St., Melrose, MA  02176
   781-662-4044  [log in to unmask] http://Cybertrails.org

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February 1998, Week 1
January 1998, Week 5
January 1998, Week 4
January 1998, Week 3
January 1998, Week 2
January 1998, Week 1
December 1997, Week 5
December 1997, Week 4
December 1997, Week 3
December 1997, Week 2
December 1997, Week 1
November 1997, Week 5
November 1997, Week 4
November 1997, Week 3
November 1997, Week 2
November 1997, Week 1
October 1997, Week 5
October 1997, Week 4
October 1997, Week 3
October 1997, Week 2
October 1997, Week 1
September 1997, Week 5
September 1997, Week 4
September 1997, Week 3
September 1997, Week 2
September 1997, Week 1
August 1997, Week 5
August 1997, Week 4
August 1997, Week 3
August 1997, Week 2
August 1997, Week 1
July 1997, Week 5
July 1997, Week 4
July 1997, Week 3
July 1997, Week 2
July 1997, Week 1
June 1997, Week 5
June 1997, Week 4
June 1997, Week 3
June 1997, Week 2
June 1997, Week 1
May 1997, Week 5
May 1997, Week 4
May 1997, Week 3
May 1997, Week 2
May 1997, Week 1
April 1997, Week 5
April 1997, Week 4
April 1997, Week 3
April 1997, Week 2
April 1997, Week 1
March 1997, Week 6
March 1997, Week 5
March 1997, Week 4
March 1997, Week 3
March 1997, Week 2
March 1997, Week 1
February 1997, Week 5
February 1997, Week 4
February 1997, Week 3
February 1997, Week 2
February 1997, Week 1
January 1997, Week 5
January 1997, Week 4
January 1997, Week 3
January 1997, Week 2
January 1997, Week 1
December 1996, Week 4
December 1996, Week 3
December 1996, Week 2
December 1996, Week 1
November 1996, Week 5
November 1996, Week 4
November 1996, Week 3
November 1996, Week 2
November 1996, Week 1
October 1996, Week 5
October 1996, Week 4
October 1996, Week 3
October 1996, Week 2
October 1996, Week 1
September 1996, Week 5
September 1996, Week 4
September 1996, Week 3
September 1996, Week 2
September 1996, Week 1
August 1996, Week 5
August 1996, Week 4
August 1996, Week 3
August 1996, Week 2
August 1996, Week 1
July 1996, Week 5
July 1996, Week 4
July 1996, Week 3
July 1996, Week 2
July 1996, Week 1
June 1996, Week 5
June 1996, Week 4
June 1996, Week 3
June 1996, Week 2
June 1996, Week 1
May 1996, Week 5
May 1996, Week 4
May 1996, Week 3
May 1996, Week 2
May 1996, Week 1
April 1996, Week 5
April 1996, Week 4
April 1996, Week 3
April 1996, Week 2
April 1996, Week 1
March 1996, Week 6
March 1996, Week 5
March 1996, Week 4
March 1996, Week 3
March 1996, Week 2
March 1996, Week 1
February 1996, Week 5
February 1996, Week 4
February 1996, Week 3
February 1996, Week 2
February 1996, Week 1
January 1996, Week 5
January 1996, Week 4
January 1996, Week 3
January 1996, Week 2
January 1996, Week 1
December 1995, Week 6
December 1995, Week 5
December 1995, Week 4
December 1995, Week 3
December 1995, Week 2
December 1995, Week 1
November 1995, Week 5
November 1995, Week 4
November 1995, Week 3
November 1995, Week 2
November 1995, Week 1
October 1995, Week 5
October 1995, Week 4
October 1995, Week 3
October 1995, Week 2
October 1995, Week 1
October 1995, Week -15
September 1995, Week 5
September 1995, Week 4
September 1995, Week 3
September 1995, Week 2
September 1995, Week 1
August 1995, Week 5
August 1995, Week 4
August 1995, Week 3
August 1995, Week 2
August 1995, Week 1
July 1995, Week 5
July 1995, Week 4
July 1995, Week 3
July 1995, Week 2
July 1995, Week 1
June 1995, Week 5
June 1995, Week 4
June 1995, Week 3
June 1995, Week 2
June 1995, Week 1
May 1995, Week 5
May 1995, Week 4
May 1995, Week 3
May 1995, Week 2
May 1995, Week 1
April 1995, Week 5
April 1995, Week 4
April 1995, Week 3
April 1995, Week 2
April 1995, Week 1
March 1995, Week 5
March 1995, Week 4
March 1995, Week 3
March 1995, Week 2
March 1995, Week 1
February 1995, Week 4
February 1995, Week 3
February 1995, Week 2
February 1995, Week 1
January 1995, Week 5
January 1995, Week 4
January 1995, Week 3
January 1995, Week 2
January 1995, Week 1
December 1994, Week 5
December 1994, Week 4
December 1994, Week 3
December 1994, Week 2
December 1994, Week 1
November 1994, Week 5
November 1994, Week 4
November 1994, Week 3
November 1994, Week 2
November 1994, Week 1
October 1994, Week 5
October 1994, Week 4
October 1994, Week 3
October 1994, Week 2
October 1994, Week 1
September 1994, Week 5
September 1994, Week 4
September 1994, Week 3
September 1994, Week 2
September 1994, Week 1
August 1994, Week 5
August 1994, Week 4
August 1994, Week 3
August 1994, Week 2
August 1994, Week 1
July 1994, Week 5
July 1994, Week 4
July 1994, Week 3
July 1994, Week 2
July 1994, Week 1
June 1994, Week 5
June 1994, Week 4
June 1994, Week 3
June 1994, Week 2
June 1994, Week 1
May 1994, Week 5
May 1994, Week 4
May 1994, Week 3
May 1994, Week 2
May 1994, Week 1
April 1994, Week 5
April 1994, Week 4
April 1994, Week 3
April 1994, Week 2
April 1994, Week 1
March 1994, Week 5
March 1994, Week 4
March 1994, Week 3
March 1994, Week 2
March 1994, Week 1
February 1994, Week 4
February 1994, Week 3
February 1994, Week 2
February 1994, Week 1
January 1994, Week 5
January 1994, Week 4
January 1994, Week 3
January 1994, Week 2
January 1994, Week 1
December 1993, Week 5
December 1993, Week 4
December 1993, Week 3
December 1993, Week 2
December 1993, Week 1
November 1993, Week 5
November 1993, Week 4
November 1993, Week 3
November 1993, Week 2
November 1993, Week 1
October 1993, Week 5
October 1993, Week 4
October 1993, Week 3
October 1993, Week 2
October 1993, Week 1
September 1993, Week 5
September 1993, Week 4
September 1993, Week 3
September 1993, Week 2
September 1993, Week 1
August 1993, Week 5
August 1993, Week 4
August 1993, Week 3
August 1993, Week 2
August 1993, Week 1
July 1993, Week 5
July 1993, Week 4
July 1993, Week 3
July 1993, Week 2
July 1993, Week 1
June 1993, Week 5
June 1993, Week 4
June 1993, Week 3
June 1993, Week 2
June 1993, Week 1
May 1993, Week 5
May 1993, Week 4
May 1993, Week 3
May 1993, Week 2
May 1993, Week 1
April 1993, Week 5
April 1993, Week 4
April 1993, Week 3
April 1993, Week 2
April 1993, Week 1
March 1993, Week 5
March 1993, Week 4
March 1993
February 1993

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