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VBBA  July 2007

VBBA July 2007

Subject:

Miles Pond 4 and Seneca Mt 6

From:

Chris Rimmer <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Chris Rimmer <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 5 Jul 2007 08:09:16 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

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text/plain (46 lines)

VERMONT BREEDING BIRD ATLAS POSTING

In an effort to finish two Essex Co. priority blocks, I spent a few 
hours on Tuesday on Miles Pond 4 and several hours yesterday on 
Seneca Mt. 6.  I needed 7 COs for Miles Pond 4 but managed only 
5.  Feeding recent fledglings were Brown Creeper, Hermit Thrush, and 
Common Grackle.  A female Scarlet Tanager (the first and only I have 
observed on the block) was carrying food, and I found a Dark-eyed 
Junco nest with 4 recently-hatched chicks.  I spent far too much time 
craning my neck watching foraging adults in treetops without food in 
their bills -- Black-throated Greens, Blackburnians, and N. Parulas 
were especially uncooperative.

I spent yesterday late morning and afternoon atlassing along the 
access road to East Mt on Seneca Mt 6.  Interestingly, Blackpoll 
Warblers were everywhere in suitable habitats of dense, small fir and 
spruce, at elevations of 6-800 m.  They actually seemed more abundant 
at those elevations than on the mountaintop, where they are typically 
one of the most numerous species.  I flushed a female off a nest with 
2 eggs and had at least 6-7 pairs carrying food.  I wish other 
species had been as easy to confirm.... I needed 11 new confirmations 
but only came away with 6.  All were of adults carrying food and/or 
feeding fledglings, and included Black-throated Green Warbler, 
Black-and-white Warbler, Canada Warbler, Mourning Warbler, Common 
Yellowthroat, and Lincoln's Sparrow.  Two interesting new species for 
the block included a female Tennessee Warbler and a (Western) Palm 
Warbler at the edge of a small bog -- both investigated my pishing, 
but neither had food or acted agitated as if a nest or young were 
nearby.  I also checked on a Black-throated Blue Warbler nest I've 
been following since early building stages -- there are now 4 young 
2-3 days old.

While I'd have liked to finish both blocks and move on to help 
elsewhere, I can't say I mind having to make one more trip back up there....

Chris
*************************************
Chris Rimmer
Conservation Biology Dept.
Vermont Institute of Natural Science
6565 Woodstock Road
P.O. Box 1281
Quechee, VT 05059
802-359-5001 ext. 230
www.vinsweb.org/cbd/index.html

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