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CRVNET  November 2007

CRVNET November 2007

Subject:

[Fwd: Vermont Humanities December]

From:

Kristin Peterson-Ishaq <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Center for research on Vermont list <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 20 Nov 2007 09:53:28 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (137 lines)

---Forwarded Message---

VERMONT HUMANITIES COUNCIL
Sharing Our Past . . . Shaping Our Future

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  
11 Loomis Street * Montpelier, Vermont 05602 * (802) 262-2626
[log in to unmask] * www.vermonthumanities.org

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  
Calendar of Events - December 1, 2007 through January 15, 2008
All events are free, open to the public, and accessible to people with disabilities, unless otherwise noted.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ADDISON COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5 ~ THE ENDURING APPEAL OF ARTHUR. Part of the First Wednesdays series. King Arthur has been a recurring feature of Western Civilization for nearly fifteen hundred years. This lecture by Canadian historian Jim Slocombe explores why an obscure sixth-century chieftain, whose very existence is questionable, whose actual name is open to debate, and whose origins are, to say the least, humble, should hold a place in the hearts and minds of contemporary enthusiasts, readers, scholars, artists, poets, novelists, and film-makers around the world. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Ilsley Public Library. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Chris Kirby, (802) 388-4095.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 ~ THE TWO VERMONTS: THEN AND NOW. Part of the First Wednesdays series. Vermont has always considered itself a special community, but what does it really mean to be a Vermonter? In this lecture Paul Searls examines the cultural and political perspectives that have long existed between "uphill" farmers married to tradition, and "downhill" villagers and urbanites working for reform. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Ilsley Public Library. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Chris Kirby, (802) 388-4095.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
BENNINGTON COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5 ~ AMERICAN CREATION: TRIUMPHS AND TRAGEDIES IN THE FOUNDING OF THE REPUBLIC. Part of the First Wednesdays series. The last quarter of the eighteenth century remains the most politically creative era in American history, a time when a dedicated and determined group of men undertook a bold experiment in political ideals. Pulitzer Prize winner Joseph Ellis believes it was a time of triumphs and tragedies, all of which contributed to the shaping of our burgeoning nation. In this lecture, Mr. Ellis outlines his belief that, due to the institution of slavery and the lack of a just settlement with Native Americans, this was a time of flawed greatness in our nation's history. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Mark Skinner Library. Manchester, First Congregational Church, 7:00 p.m. Call Cindy Waters, (802) 362-2607.  

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 ~ POWERS OF PERSUASION. Part of the First Wednesdays series. In her final superb novel, Persuasion, Jane Austen combined social satire with profound feeling. Bennington College Professor April Bernard considers why this "fairy tale for grown-ups" continues to compel readers. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Mark Skinner Library. Manchester, First Congregational Church, 7:00 p.m. Call Cindy Waters, (802) 362-2607.  

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
CALEDONIA COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5 ~ WHERE IN THE WORLD IS KINGDOM COUNTY? Part of the First Wednesdays series. Vermont writer Howard Frank Mosher tells the story of how he first came to the Northeast Kingdom and discovered a remnant of a much earlier New England, left over from the Depression and Prohibition eras, full of wonderful stories from the lives and times of some of the last independent-minded individualists in America. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 7:00 p.m. Call Lisa von Kann, (802) 748-8291.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19 ~ BOOK DISCUSSION: J. D. SALINGER'S THE CATCHER IN THE RYE. Part of the What a Character series. What makes a character memorable? Why do the protagonists in these works of fiction linger long after the last page is turned? Led by Robert Johnson. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Pope Memorial Library. Danville, Pope Memorial Library, Wednesdays, 7:00 p.m. Call Deidre Palmer, (802) 684-2256. 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 ~ 27 RUE DE FLEURUS. Part of the First Wednesdays series. Dartmouth College Professor Barbara Will describes the Salon Gertrude Stein created on the Left Bank in Paris, which included many 20th-century literary luminaries. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 7:00 p.m. Call Lisa von Kann, (802) 748-8291.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 8 ~ BOOK DISCUSSION: DORIS KEARNS GOODWIN'S NO ORDINARY TIME: FRANKLIN AND ELEANOR ROOSEVELT ON THE HOMEFRONT IN WORLD WAR II. Part of the Coming of Age series. From a wide range of perspectives, this series examines the lives of men and women who "came of age" during World War II. The social and historical texts chart the history-public and private-of life on the home front during the war that launched America's "Greatest Generation." Led by Helene Lang. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Walden Community Library. West Danville, Walden Community Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Stuart Smith, (802) 503-2630.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
CHITTENDEN COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5 ~ BOOK CLUBS, TUPPERWARE, AND OPRAH. Part of the First Wednesdays series. At last count, there were over two million book clubs in this country, a tangible personification of Toni Morrison's belief that "reading should have a talking life." And yet, who is doing this "reading" and this "talking"? In the nineteenth century, the reading of novels was deemed a genteel and frivolous pursuit, clearly feminine. Today, the most ubiquitous image of book clubs perpetuates this gendering of reading through the body and persona of Oprah. UVM Professor Sarah Turner asks: Are book clubs a gendered sphere? Should they be? A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Fletcher Free Library. Burlington, Fletcher Free Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Barbara Shatara, (802) 865-7211.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12 ~ OH, VICTORIA! She was the first woman to run for President of the United States (1872) and was the first to testify before a committee of Congress. She traveled the country, preaching free love. She and her sister were the world's first female stockbrokers. They also broke the scandal of the century on the front page of their newspaper. She spent her last thirty years as Lady of the Manor in Bredons Norton, England. Victoria Woodhull was larger than life. "Oh, Victoria!" is a one-woman, one-act, mini-musical monologue, performed in period costume by Sarah Payne. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 12:00 p.m. Call Naomi Miller, (802) 652-7480.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14 ~ DRAMATIC READING OF COUNTING ON GRACE. Enjoy a dramatic presentation of selected scenes from this year's Vermont Reads Book, Counting on Grace, performed by students from the Brown's River Middle School. Part of Vermont Reads, the Vermont Humanities Council's statewide, one-book community reading program. Jericho, Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, 6:30 pm. Call Anne Hawley, (802) 899-4962.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 ~ THE MEANING OF HELP. Part of the First Wednesdays series. It is the primal cry, the first word of a want ad, a song by the Beatles, the reason Uncle Sam is pointing at you-but what exactly is this thing we call help? Author Garret Keizer invites us to consider a small word with far-reaching implications for who we are and how we live. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Fletcher Free Library. Burlington, Fletcher Free Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Barbara Shatara, (802) 865-7211.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 11 ~ DOROTHY CANFIELD FISHER: A VERMONTER FOR THE WORLD. Dorothy Canfield Fisher wrote often about Vermont, but she was a writer beyond our region who communicated to the world and to the human spirit. She celebrated the book as the surest tool for thought. In her forty books of fiction and non-fiction, she attacked discrimination, intolerance, brutality, and fraud. Her writing was vibrant and heartening with glorious aspects of living life with courage and joy. This living history presentation by Helene Lang showcases her life's works. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Deborah Rawson Memorial Library. Jericho, Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, 6:30 p.m. Call Anne Hawley, (802) 899-4962.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
FRANKLIN COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

THURSDAY, JANUARY 10 ~ BOOK DISCUSSION: LOUIS BEGLEY'S WARTIME LIES. Part of the Ties That Bind series. The National Book Award winners or nominees in this series ask us to re-examine our notions of family. Led by Helene Lang. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Fairfax Community Library. Fairfax Community Library, 6:30 p.m. Call Lauren Cady, (802) 849-2420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
LAMOILLE COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

THURSDAY, JANUARY 10 ~ GEORGIA O'KEEFFE: AN AMERICAN MASTER. Georgia O'Keefe (1887-1986) early in her career clearly demonstrated her fierce independence as she charted her own course between representation and abstraction. O'Keeffe's greatly enlarged flower paintings of the 1920s brought her fame, and her long and productive life transformed her into an American icon. In 1946 she became the first woman to be the subject of a one-person retrospective exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. O'Keeffe and her husband, Alfred Stieglitz belonged to that vanguard of modernists who profoundly changed America's cultural landscape in the first half of the 20th century. Learn about this fascinating artist from retired Art History professor Bob Manning in a slide show and talk. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Lamoille Valley Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Stowe, Town and Country Resort Mountain Road, 2:00 p.m. Call Mildred Marron, (802) 253-9011.

BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES: PULITZERS. What is it that makes a book worthy of a Pulitzer? Do the characteristics change over time? Led by Linda Bland. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Varnum Memorial Library. Jeffersonville, Varnum Memorial Library, Saturdays, 3:00 p.m. Call April Tuck, (802) 644-6632.
- December 15, James Agee's A DEATH IN THE FAMILY. Led by Linda Bland.
- January 12, Shirley Ann Grau's THE KEEPERS OF THE HOUSE. Led by Linda Bland.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ORANGE COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5 ~ BOOK DISCUSSION: ANTONINE MAILLET'S PELAGIE-LA-CHARRETTE. Part of the Canadian Cultural Diversity series. Travel through Canada with critically acclaimed books that make manifest Canada's cultural diversity. Led by Suzanne H. Brown. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Bradford Public Library. Bradford Public Library, 6:30 p.m. Call Irene Mann, (802) 222-4536.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5 ~ COMMUNITY BOOK DISCUSSION OF COUNTING ON GRACE. Part of Vermont Reads, the Vermont Humanities Council's statewide, one-book community reading program. Fairlee Public Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Debra Edmands, (802) 333-4716.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11 ~ BOOK DISCUSSION: MARY MORRIS' NOTHING TO DECLARE. Part of the Americans Abroad series. We've all heard the stereotype of the "ugly American," but what really happens when Americans travel abroad? How are they perceived on foreign soil? How do they perceive themselves, displaced from their homeland? Led by Helene Lang. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Kimball Public Library. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ORLEANS COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5 ~ WHO WAS ROBERT FROST? Part of the First Wednesdays series. The poet we think of as speaking to us in the poems of Robert Frost does not always match the picture readers find in Frost's biographies. Champlain College Professor Nancy Nahra presents a surprising portrait of the artist. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Stanstead College. Stanstead College, Pierce Hall, Stanstead, Quebec, 7:00 p.m. Call Ross Murray, (819) 876-7891.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 ~ QUEEN ELIZABETH I: WOMAN MONARCH IN A MAN'S WORLD. Part of the First Wednesdays series. Queen Elizabeth I came to the throne under circumstances extremely challenging to her personally and professionally. Retired Bishop's University Professor Joanne Craig considers how Elizabeth not only survived, but also led her country through the great era now known as the Elizabethan age. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Goodrich Memorial Library. Newport, Goodrich Memorial Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Carol Nicholson, (802) 334-7902.

MONDAY, JANUARY 14 ~ BOOK DISCUSSION: JOHN BERGER'S G. Part of the Booker Prize Winners series. Established in 1968, England's Booker Prize is awarded annually to a citizen of the U.K., the Commonwealth, Ireland, Pakistan, or South Africa who has written the year's best novel according to a panel of critics, writers, and academics. In a short 35 years, the Booker has achieved an air of dignity and respect that rivals even the 86-year-old Pulitzer Prize. Graham Swift, who won the Booker in 1996, singled it out as the finest accolade a writer can receive. "It's the one which, if we're completely honest, we most covet." Led by Suzanne H. Brown. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Barton Public Library. Barton Public Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Andrea Poe, (802) 525-6524.

BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES: FOUNDING FATHERS. The Founding Fathers loom large in the history books, but who were these people really? This series removes the pedestal from beneath these historical luminaries to examine their full humanity-heroic and flawed, witty and scandalous, compassionate and sly, inventive and insecure, brilliant and brash. Led by Francette B. Cerulli. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Dailey Memorial Library. Derby, Dailey Memorial Library, Mondays, 10:30 a.m. Call Barbara Whitehill, (802) 766-5063.
- December 17, Joseph Ellis' PASSIONATE SAGE: THE CHARACTER AND LEGACY OF JOHN ADAMS
- January 7, Joseph Ellis' AMERICAN SPHINX: THE CHARACTER OF THOMAS JEFFERSON

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
RUTLAND COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12 ~ FOLKLIFE AND THE CULTURAL LEGACY OF VERMONTERS. Folklife refers to the attitudes, beliefs, and practices that we all learn informally by example. The ways in which one treats a guest, plans a holiday celebration, or shows respect for the dead are examples of folklife shaped by the cultural conventions of family and community. The folklife traditions of mainstream culture are often so familiar that they seem unremarkable or even invisible, and yet folklife defines who we are. It is Vermont's distinctive folklife traditions that help make the state unique. Gregory Sharrow of the Vermont Folklife Center will focus this talk on the folklife of ethnic communities. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Castleton Woman's Club. Castleton State College, Chapel, 1:00 p.m. Call JoAnn Riley, (802) 468-3093.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 3 ~ ORAL HISTORY AS DISCOVERY RESEARCH. Oral history is a research method that can be used to explore the fabric of everyday experience, past or present. Want to know what life on a farm was like in the 1940s? An older farmer can tell you. He or she can also describe the complex changes that led us from then to now. Gregory Sharrow of the Vermont Folklife Center explores the richness and the significance of oral history as a documentary research method, illustrated with excerpts from his field recordings, featuring remarkable people and memorable stories. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Tinmouth Historical and Genealogical Society. Tinmouth, The Old Firehouse, 7 Mountain View Road, 7:00 p.m. Call Joshua Porter, (802) 394-2911.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
WASHINGTON COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5 ~ HOW THE ROMANS INFLUENCED THE FOUNDING FATHERS. Part of the First Wednesdays series. Retired Dartmouth College Classics Professor Edward Bradley discusses ways ancient Romans felt predestined to impose their dominion throughout the Mediterranean world, and compares this attitude to that of America's Founding Fathers in the 1770s and 80s. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Montpelier, Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Rachel Senechal, (802) 223-3338.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 ~ THE ENDURING APPEAL OF ARTHUR. Part of the First Wednesdays series. King Arthur has been a recurring feature of Western Civilization for nearly fifteen hundred years. This lecture by Canadian historian Jim Slocombe explores why an obscure sixth century chieftain, whose very existence is questionable, whose actual name is open to debate, and whose origins are, to say the least, humble, should hold a place in the hearts and minds of contemporary enthusiasts, readers, scholars, artists, poets, novelists, and film-makers around the world. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Montpelier, Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Rachel Senechal, (802) 223-3338.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
WINDHAM COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5 ~ ALL ABOUT EVE. Part of the First Wednesdays series. While we may think we already know all about Eve, recent scholarship on women and the Bible pushes us to rethink our common assumptions. This lecture by Dartmouth Religion Professor Susan Ackerman considers both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the Adam and Eve story and the ways that two of the most famous women of the New Testament, Jesus' mother Mary and Mary Magdalene, were construed as "new Eves" by late antique and medieval theologians. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Jerry Carbone, (802) 254-5290.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 ~ NO ORDINARY LIVES. Part of the First Wednesdays series. In this program, filmmaker Ken Burns explores the most intimate human dimensions of World War II, the greatest cataclysm in history. This worldwide catastrophe touched the lives of every family on every street in America, and demonstrates that in extraordinary times, there are no ordinary lives. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center, 7:00 p.m. Call Jerry Carbone, (802) 254-5290.

MONDAY, JANUARY 7 ~ BOOK DISCUSSION: SHERMAN ALEXIE'S INDIAN KILLER. Part of the Mysterious Lens on American Culture series. In these mysteries, mayhem and murder play out against a cultural/ethnic backdrop-illuminating more than simply whodunnit. Led by Francette B. Cerulli. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Grafton Public Library. Grafton Public Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Linda Montecalvo, (802) 843-1444.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 10 ~ ASPECTS OF VERMONT HISTORY. J. Kevin Graffagnino, director of the Vermont Historical Society, knows Vermont and its history. This talk and slideshow will focus on the "future of Vermont's history", the Vermont Historical Society and the Vermont History Center. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Wardsboro Free Public Library. Wardsboro Town Hall, First Floor, 7:00 p.m. Call Jill Dean, (802) 896-6988.

BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES: BLUE COLLAR AMERICA. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum-wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Geraldine Pittman de Batlle. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Westminster West Public Library and Butterfield Library. 7:00 p.m. Call Beverly Major, (802) 387-4682. 
- Wednesday, December 12, Richard Russo's EMPIRE FALLS. Westminster, Butterfield Library.
- Thursday, January 10, Philip Levine's WHAT WORK IS. Putney, Westminster West Public Library.

BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES: PRESIDENTS AND FIRST LADIES. What makes for an influential and captivating presidency? This series, part of an ongoing discussion program leading up to the 2008 Presidential election, combines biographies and histories of four Presidents and their First Ladies from the early days of the United States through the turn of the 20th century. Delve into the lives and leadership of these commanders-in-chief-and the power behind their thrones.
Led by Deborah L. Luskin. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, Wednesdays, 12:00 p.m. Call Jerry Carbone, (802) 254-5290.
- December 5, Phyllis Lee Levin's EDITH AND WOODROW: THE WILSON WHITE HOUSE
- December 19, Kenfrick Clements' WOODROW WILSON: WORLD STATESMAN


# # #

---Forwarded Message--

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