LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for CRVNET Archives


CRVNET Archives

CRVNET Archives


CRVNET@LIST.UVM.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

CRVNET Home

CRVNET Home

CRVNET  December 2007

CRVNET December 2007

Subject:

[Fwd: Vermont Humanities January]

From:

Kristin Peterson-Ishaq <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Center for research on Vermont list <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 19 Dec 2007 14:42:09 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (202 lines)

---Forwarded Message---

VERMONT HUMANITIES COUNCIL
Sharing Our Past . . . Shaping Our Future

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  
11 Loomis Street * Montpelier, Vermont 05602 * (802) 262-2626
[log in to unmask] * www.vermonthumanities.org

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  
Calendar of Events - January 1 through February 15, 2008
All events are free, open to the public, and accessible to people with disabilities, unless otherwise noted.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ADDISON COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 ~ THE TWO VERMONTS: THEN AND NOW. Part of the First Wednesdays series. Vermont has always considered itself a special community, but what does it really mean to be a Vermonter? In this lecture, Paul Searls examines the cultural and political perspectives that have long existed between "uphill" farmers married to tradition, and "downhill" villagers and urbanites working for reform. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Ilsley Public Library. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Chris Kirby, (802) 388-4095.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 ~ WOMEN AND READING. Part of the First Wednesdays series. At last count, there were over two million book clubs in this country, a tangible personification of Toni Morrison's belief that "reading should have a talking life." And yet, who is doing this "reading" and this "talking"? In the nineteenth century, the reading of novels was deemed a genteel and frivolous pursuit, clearly feminine. Today, the most ubiquitous image of book clubs perpetuates this gendering of reading through the body and persona of Oprah. UVM Professor Sarah Turner asks: Are book clubs a gendered sphere? Should they be? A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Ilsley Public Library. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Chris Kirby, (802) 388-4095.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
BENNINGTON COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 ~ POWERS OF PERSUASION. Part of the First Wednesdays series. In her final superb novel, Persuasion, Jane Austen combined social satire with profound feeling. Bennington College Professor April Bernard considers why this "fairy tale for grown-ups" continues to compel readers. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Mark Skinner Library. Manchester, First Congregational Church, 7:00 p.m. Call Cindy Waters, (802) 362-2607.  

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 ~ LOVE AND LANGUAGE. Part of the First Wednesdays series. Does the word "love" mean the same in every civilization? Has the concept changed throughout history? Amherst College Professor Ilan Stavans explores the variations of love across time and place. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Mark Skinner Library. Manchester, First Congregational Church, 7:00 p.m. Call Cindy Waters, (802) 362-2607.  

BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES: PORTRAITS OF THE ARTISTS. These books feature fictional interpretations of famous artists. What happens when the visual arts and the literary arts meet? How do fiction writers interpret the lives of famous painters, and the canvases they leave behind? Led by Geraldine Pittman de Batlle. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Friends of the Bennington Free Library. Bennington Free Library, Sundays, 2:00 p.m. Call Susan Nutting, (802) 447-3286.
- February 3, David Huddle's LA TOUR DREAMS OF THE WOLF GIRL
- February 17, Tracy Chevalier's GIRL WITH A PEARL EARRING

BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES: THE RISE OF THE ENGLISH NOVEL. This four-session Reading and Discussion program will examine early novels. Led by Mr. Eric A. Bye. Supported in part by a grant from the Vermont Humanities Council. Dorset Library, Tuesdays, 10:00 a.m. Call Barbara Howland, (802) 867-5376.
- January 8, Daniel Defoe's MOLL FLANDERS
- January 22, Samuel Richardson's PAMELA
- February 5, Henry Fielding's JOSEPH ANDREWS
- February 19, Tobias Smollet's THE EXPEDITION OF HUMPHREY CLINKER

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
CALEDONIA COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 ~ 27 RUE DE FLEURUS. Part of the First Wednesdays series. Dartmouth College Professor Barbara Will describes the Salon Gertrude Stein created on the Left Bank in Paris, which included many 20th-century literary luminaries. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 7:00 p.m. Call Lisa von Kann, (802) 748-8291.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 ~ FORWARD FROM HERE: LEAVING MIDDLE AGE AND OTHER UNEXPECTED ADVENTURES. Part of the First Wednesdays series. In the tradition of her mother's Gift from the Sea and Nora Ephron's I Feel Bad About My Neck, Reeve Lindbergh talks about leaving middle age, and other unexpected adventures, from snapping turtles in the road to new revelations, and new relatives in her family. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 7:00 p.m. Call Lisa von Kann, (802) 748-8291.

BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES: COMING OF AGE. From a wide range of perspectives, this series examines the lives of men and women who "came of age" during World War II. The social and historical texts chart the history-public and private-of life on the home front during the war that launched America's "Greatest Generation." Led by Helene Lang. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Walden Community Library. West Danville, Walden Community Library, Tuesdays, 7:00 p.m. Call Stuart Smith, (802) 503-2630.
- January 8, Doris Kearns Goodwin's NO ORDINARY TIME: FRANKLIN AND ELEANOR ROOSEVELT ON THE HOMEFRONT IN WORLD WAR II
- February 5, Ronald Takaki's DOUBLE VICTORY: A MULTICULTURAL HISTORY OF AMERICA IN WORLD WAR II

BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES: PULITZERS II. This series invites readers to curl up with a diverse array of award-winning novels and ask themselves: Why did they win? And would I have chosen them if I had been a judge? Whether it's the well-drawn characters, evocative settings, rich language-or all of the above-the ensuing discussion is sure to be dynamic. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Cobleigh Public Library. Lyndonville, Cobleigh Public Library, Thursdays, 7:00 p.m. Call Cindy Karasinski, (802) 626-5475.
- January 24, John Steinbeck's THE GRAPES OF WRATH. Led by Helene Lang.
- February 7, Beth Henley's CRIMES OF THE HEART. Led by Suzanne H. Brown.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
CHITTENDEN COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 ~ THE MEANING OF HELP. Part of the First Wednesdays series. It is the primal cry, the first word of a want ad, a song by the Beatles, the reason Uncle Sam is pointing at you-but what exactly is this thing we call help? Author Garret Keizer invites us to consider a small word with far-reaching implications for who we are and how we live. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Fletcher Free Library. Burlington, Fletcher Free Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Barbara Shatara, (802) 865-7211.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 11 ~ DOROTHY CANFIELD FISHER: A VERMONTER FOR THE WORLD. Dorothy Canfield Fisher wrote often about Vermont, but she was a writer beyond our region who communicated to the world and to the human spirit. She celebrated the book as the surest tool for thought. In her forty books of fiction and non-fiction, she attacked discrimination, intolerance, brutality, and fraud. Her writing was vibrant and heartening with glorious aspects of living life with courage and joy. This living history presentation by Helene Lang showcases her life's works. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Deborah Rawson Memorial Library. Jericho, Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, 6:30 p.m. Call Anne Hawley, (802) 899-4962.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16 ~ AGATHA CHRISTIE: CREATOR OF MISS JANE MARPLE AND HERCULE POIROT. In this living history performance by Helene Lang, Ms. Christie tells you how a typewriter in Torguay spawned over 80 mysteries and created Miss Jane Marple and Hercule Poirot. Learn about her life and walk in her footsteps in England. Discover why she was so knowledgeable about the poisons used in her stories; what influences in her life informed the creation of her famous leading detectives; some personal information about her family; and why she went to Yorkshire under an assumed name. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin Retirement Community, 2:30 p.m. Call Susan DuCharme, (802) 264-5107.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17 ~ KLEMPERER AND VON KARAJAN. Although his conducting career was periodically interrupted by serious illness, Otto Klemperer established an international reputation as a controversial conductor as well as a fascinating character. Klemperer was also a prolific composer. One of Klemperer's rivals in early 20th-century Germany, Herbert von Karajan, had joined the Nazi party in the 1930s, facilitating his early success as a conductor throughout pro-German Europe. Following World War II, he was not welcome as a conductor in many parts of the world. But despite the postwar ban placed on him by allied nations, he was able to make more than 150 recordings in the decade following the war. Led by Champlain College instructor and flutist, Lois Price. Part of the Lifelong Learning Music Series, supported in part by a grant from the Vermont Humanities Council. South Burlington Community Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Louise Murphy, (802) 652-7076.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 20 ~ OLD-TIME RULES WILL PREVAIL: THE FIDDLE CONTEST IN VERMONT. Fiddle contests evolved from endurance events to demonstrations of a set number of tunes judged by certain criteria. All tried to determine who was best. These events helped raise money for local organizations of every description, as well as preserve old-time fiddling. In recent years, the fiddle contest has declined significantly, due to the waning interest of competitors and spectators, as well as diminished financial viability. This program will include listening to rare recordings of live competitions illustrating different playing styles of the past as well as some live fiddling by the presenter, Adam Boyce. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Richmond Historical Society. Richmond Free Library, Community Room, 4:00 p.m. Call Martha Turner, (802) 434-6453.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 29 ~ SHIPWRECKS OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN. Learn about Lake Champlain's most harrowing shipwreck stories from the Revolutionary War to the present day with Lake Champlain Maritime Museum archaeologist Adam Kane. With over 300 wrecks in its dark, cold waters, Lake Champlain has witnessed feats of heroism and terrible tragedies. Take a memorable tour through slides, drawings, and video of what lies beneath the waves. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Williston Historical Society. Williston, Old Brick Church, Route 2, 6:00 p.m. Call Jon Stokes, (802) 425-3066.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30 ~ CIVIL WAR SITES IN VERMONT. The Civil War affected everyone, not just those who carried a gun. In researching a new book on Civil War home sites, historian and author Howard Coffin has found some fascinating places right here in Vermont, including a cave where a man lived for years to avoid the draft, a home where a woman sequestered herself after hearing of her fiancÚ's death, and an isolated house where soldiers returning with syphilis were quarantined. Come hear about these places and share your stories of Civil War sites in your community. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Brownell Library. Essex Junction, Brownell Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Penelope Pillsbury, (802) 878-6954.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 ~ WHY JUNG? Part of the First Wednesdays series. Jungian analyst and author Dr. Polly Young-Eisendrath explores why the psychology of Carl Jung has had staying power in helping us understand ourselves. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Fletcher Free Library. Burlington, Fletcher Free Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Barbara Shatara, (802) 865-7211. 

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 ~ THE IRISH IN VERMONT. This lecture by Dan Casey presents a historical survey of the Irish in America-how they came, what they found, and where they settled. The talk also considers the coming of the Irish to the early rural settlements, as well as the later economic draw of Burlington, Rutland, and Vermont's other urban centers. Significant and colorful characters-the Reverend Jeremiah O'Callaghan, Civil War hero John Lonergan, and Mayor James Edmund Burke-are part of the story. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin Retirement Community, 7:30 p.m. Call Susan DuCharme, (802) 264-5107.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
FRANKLIN COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES: THE TIES THAT BIND. Each of these National Book Award winners or nominees asks us to re-examine our notions of family. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Fairfax Community Library. Fairfax Community Library, 6:30 p.m. Call Lauren Cady, (802) 849-2420.
- January 10, Louis Begley's WARTIME LIES. Led by Helene Lang.
- February 12, John Updike's THE CENTAUR. Led by Cheryl Heneveld.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
GRAND ISLE COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES: NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE. These titles include fiction, myth, poetry, and personal narrative-and represent some of the finest work by Native writers since the renaissance of American Indian writing in the 1970s. Led by Arthur W. Biddle.
A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by South Hero Community Library. South Hero Community Library, Wednesdays, 7:00 p.m. Call Annie Brabazon, (802) 372-6209.
- January 9, N. Scott Momaday's THE WAY TO RAINY MOUNTAIN
- January 30, Leslie Marmon Silko's CEREMONY
- February 13, Joy Harjo's THE WOMAN WHO FELL FROM THE SKY: POEMS

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
LAMOILLE COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

THURSDAY, JANUARY 10 ~ GEORGIA O'KEEFFE: AN AMERICAN MASTER. Georgia O'Keefe (1887-1986) clearly demonstrated her fierce independence as she charted her own course between representation and abstraction. O'Keeffe's greatly enlarged flower paintings of the 1920s brought her fame, and her long and productive life transformed her into an American icon. In 1946 she became the first woman to be the subject of a one-person retrospective exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. O'Keeffe and her husband, Alfred Stieglitz belonged to that vanguard of modernists who profoundly changed America's cultural landscape in the first half of the 20th century. Learn about this fascinating artist from retired Art History professor Bob Manning in a slide show and talk. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Lamoille Valley Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Stowe, Town and Country Resort Mountain Road, 2:00 p.m. Call Mildred Marron, (802) 253-9011.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12 ~ "A WOMAN, AIN'T I?" Born a slave in New Paltz, New York, Isabella Baumfree walked away from slavery and in her travels evolved into Sojourner Truth: maid, laundress, evangelist, abolitionist, and suffragist. This program, presented by Kathryn Woods, tells Sojourner Truth's story in her own words, speeches, and songs. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Unitarian Universalist Fellowship. Stowe, Helen Day Art Center, 7:00 p.m. Call Nancy Merz, (802) 253-8291.

BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES: COMPREHENDING TODAY'S MIDDLE EAST. This six-part lecture and book discussion series will focus on the culture, heritage, religion and policies of the countries of the Middle East and their relationships with the United States. Led by Victor R. Swenson. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Morristown Centennial Library and Lamoille South Supervisory Union. Morrisville, Morristown Centennial Library, Thursdays, 7:00 p.m. Call Viola Behrends, (802) 888-5851.
- January 3, Karen Armstrong's MUHAMMAD: A BIOGRAPHY OF THE PROPHET
- January 24, Benny Morris' RIGHTEOUS VICTIMS: A HISTORY OF THE ZIONIST-ARAB CONFLICT, 1881-1999
- February 7, Sahar Khalifeh's WILD THORNS

BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES: PULITZERS. What is it that makes a book worthy of a Pulitzer? Do the characteristics change over time? Led by Linda Bland. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Varnum Memorial Library. Jeffersonville, Varnum Memorial Library, Saturdays, 3:00 p.m. Call April Tuck, (802) 644-6632.
- January 12, Shirley Ann Grau's THE KEEPERS OF THE HOUSE. Led by Linda Bland.
- February 9, John Kennedy Toole's A CONFEDERACY OF DUNCES. Led by Francette B. Cerulli.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ORANGE COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

THURSDAY, JANUARY 10 ~ THE GRANITE WORKERS OF BARRE. This slide presentation and lecture by John Johnson illustrates the granite workers of Barre and explains the images within the context of America's industrial heritage using six themes: influence of cultural groups on the character of the industry; granite art as an expression of cultural values; role of the granite industry in the industrialization of Vermont; role of labor unions; merging of science and technology; and environmental changes. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Tunbridge Public Library. Tunbridge Public Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Kay Jorgensen, (802) 889-5528.

BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES: MEET THE VICTORIANS. For some people, "Victorian" evokes images of overstuffed furniture and repressed, sanctimonious people, but for the Victorians themselves, life was anything but stuffy and staid. In fact, the world was changing at a dizzying pace, with railroads and the telegraph collapsing time and space, and a booming industrial economy bringing both great wealth and terrible poverty. This series takes readers beyond stereotypes to a better understanding of the Victorians and ourselves. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Latham Memorial Library. Thetford, Latham Memorial Library, Mondays, 7:00 p.m. Call Peter Blodgett, (802) 785-4361.
- January 7, Thomas Hardy's TESS OF THE D' URBERVILLES. Led by Jean Gerber.
- January 21, George Eliot's DANIEL DERONDA. Led by Patricia S. Norton.
- February 4, Charlotte Bronte's VILLETTE. Led by Jean Gerber.

BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES: CANADIAN CULTURAL DIVERSITY. Travel through Canada with four critically acclaimed books that make manifest Canada's cultural diversity. Led by Helene Lang. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Kimball Public Library. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, Tuesdays, 7:00 p.m. Call Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073.
- January 22, Emily Carr's KLEE WYCK
- February 26, Antonine Maillet's PELAGIE-LA-CHARRETTE

BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES: MEET THE VICTORIANS. For some people, "Victorian" evokes images of overstuffed furniture and repressed, sanctimonious people, but for the Victorians themselves, life was anything but stuffy and staid. In fact, the world was changing at a dizzying pace, with railroads and the telegraph collapsing time and space, and a booming industrial economy bringing both great wealth and terrible poverty. This series takes readers beyond stereotypes to a better understanding of the Victorians and ourselves. Led by Suzanne H. Brown. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Blake Memorial Library. East Corinth, Blake Memorial Library, Mondays, 3:30 p.m. Call Marie McAndrew-Taylor, (802) 439-5338.
- January 14, Anthony Trollope's CAN YOU FORGIVE HER?
- February 11, George Eliot's DANIEL DERONDA.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ORLEANS COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 ~ QUEEN ELIZABETH I: WOMAN MONARCH IN A MAN'S WORLD. Part of the First Wednesdays series. Queen Elizabeth I came to the throne under circumstances extremely challenging to her personally and professionally. Retired Bishop's University Professor Joanne Craig considers how Elizabeth not only survived, but also led her country through the great era now known as the Elizabethan age. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Goodrich Memorial Library. Newport, Goodrich Memorial Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Carol Nicholson, (802) 334-7902.

MONDAY, JANUARY 7 ~ BOOK DISCUSSION: JOSEPH ELLIS' AMERICAN SPHINX: THE CHARACTER OF THOMAS JEFFERSON. Part of the Founding Fathers series. The founding fathers loom large in the history books, but who were these people really? This series removes the pedestal from beneath these historical luminaries to examine their full humanity-heroic and flawed, witty and scandalous, compassionate and sly, inventive and insecure, brilliant and brash.
Led by Francette B. Cerulli. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Dailey Memorial Library. Derby, Dailey Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Call Barbara Whitehill, (802) 766-5063.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 ~ GOING TO WAR IN SHAKESPEARE: OLIVIER, BRANAGH, AND HENRY V. Part of the First Wednesdays series. Shakespeare is famous for stimulating multiple interpretations, especially when events in a given play seems to evoke current issues. Using clips from the film versions of Henry V by Laurence Olivier (1944) and Kenneth Branagh (1989), Dartmouth Professor Peter Saccio explores the richness of Shakespeare and the ways in which his play, staging events of 1415 and first performed in 1599, has spoken to our own times. 
A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Stanstead College. Stanstead College, Pierce Hall, Stanstead, Quebec, 7:00 p.m. Call Ross Murray, (819) 876-7891.

BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES: BOOKER PRIZE WINNERS. Established in 1968, England's Booker Prize is awarded annually to a citizen of the U.K., the Commonwealth, Ireland, Pakistan, or South Africa who has written the year's best novel according to a panel of critics, writers, and academics. In a short 35 years, the Booker has achieved an air of dignity and respect that rivals even the 86-year-old Pulitzer Prize. Graham Swift, who won the Booker in 1996, singled it out as the finest accolade a writer can receive. "It's the one which, if we're completely honest, we most covet." Led by Suzanne H. Brown. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Barton Public Library. Barton Public Library, Mondays, 7:00 p.m. Call Andrea Poe, (802) 525-6524.
- January 14, John Berger's G.
- February 11, J. M. Coetzee's THE LIFE AND TIMES OF MICHAEL K.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
RUTLAND COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

THURSDAY, JANUARY 3 ~ ORAL HISTORY AS DISCOVERY RESEARCH. Oral history is a research method that can be used to explore the fabric of everyday experience, past or present. Want to know what life on a farm was like in the 1940s? An older farmer can tell you. He or she can also describe the complex changes that led us from then to now. Gregory Sharrow of the Vermont Folklife Center explores the richness and the significance of oral history as a documentary research method, illustrated with excerpts from his field recordings, featuring remarkable people and memorable stories. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Tinmouth Historical and Genealogical Society. Tinmouth, The Old Firehouse, 7 Mountain View Road, 7:00 p.m. Call Joshua Porter, (802) 394-2911.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
WASHINGTON COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 ~ THE ENDURING APPEAL OF ARTHUR. Part of the First Wednesdays series. King Arthur has been a recurring feature of Western Civilization for nearly fifteen hundred years. This lecture by Canadian historian Jim Slocombe explores why an obscure sixth century chieftain, whose very existence is questionable, whose actual name is open to debate, and whose origins are, to say the least, humble, should hold a place in the hearts and minds of contemporary enthusiasts, readers, scholars, artists, poets, novelists, and film-makers around the world. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Montpelier, Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Rachel Senechal, (802) 223-3338.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30 ~ ELEANOR ROOSEVELT: ADVOCATE FOR UNIVERSAL HUMAN RIGHTS.  FARMERS' NIGHT AT THE STATEHOUSE. In this informal talk, Mrs. Roosevelt, played by Elana Dodd, recalls her years with the United Nations Human Rights Commission and the drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The first of its kind, the Declaration has remained a crucial statement since its adoption in 1948. Eleanor Roosevelt describes the struggles to reach consensus among delegates from diverse nations and cultures, and manages to find humor in each difficult situation. She reminds us vividly that human rights and responsibilities begin at home, in the everyday world of human beings. A Vermont Humanities Council event. Motnpelier, House Chambers, Vermotn State House, 7:30 p.m. Gretchen Calcagni, 802.262.2626.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3 ~ GEORGIA O'KEEFFE: AN AMERICAN MASTER. Georgia O'Keefe (1887-1986) clearly demonstrated her fierce independence as she charted her own course between representation and abstraction. O'Keeffe's greatly enlarged flower paintings of the 1920s brought her fame, and her long and productive life transformed her into an American icon. In 1946 she became the first woman to be the subject of a one-person retrospective exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. O'Keeffe and her husband, Alfred Stieglitz belonged to that vanguard of modernists who profoundly changed America's cultural landscape in the first half of the 20th century. Learn about this fascinating artist from retired Art History professor Bob Manning in a slide show and talk. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Studio Place Arts. Barre, Studio Place Arts, 3:30 p.m. Call Sue Higby, (802) 479-7069.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 ~ THE CULTURE OF FOOD IN RURAL CHINA. Part of the First Wednesdays series. Despite the fact that globalization has brought "fast food" and other western food habits to urban China, local foodways still flourish in rural China.  Food in rural China is used not only for nourishment, but also to create and sustain social relations, and as a token laden with symbolic meanings.  In fact, concern with food penetrates almost all areas of social and cultural life.  Based on her fieldwork in a Chinese village in 2007, this lecture by Middlebury College Professor Ellen Oxfeld will look at the influence of social change on food consumption and production; changes and continuities in the symbolic meanings of food; food in social relationships and within the family, and local ideas about the relationship between food and health. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Montpelier, Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Rachel Senechal, !
 (802) 223-3338.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
WINDHAM COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 ~ NO ORDINARY LIVES. Part of the First Wednesdays series. In this program, filmmaker Ken Burns explores the most intimate human dimensions of World War II, the greatest cataclysm in history. This worldwide catastrophe touched the lives of every family on every street in America, and demonstrates that in extraordinary times, there are no ordinary lives. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Brooks Memorial Library. Part of the National Endowment for the Humanities We the People project: sharing the lessons of history with all Americans. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center, 7:00 p.m. Call Jerry Carbone, (802) 254-5290.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 10 ~ ASPECTS OF VERMONT HISTORY. J. Kevin Graffagnino, director of the Vermont Historical Society, knows Vermont and its history. This talk and slideshow will focus on the "future of Vermont's history", the Vermont Historical Society and the Vermont History Center. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Wardsboro Free Public Library. Wardsboro Town Hall, First Floor, 7:00 p.m. Call Jill Dean, (802) 896-6988.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 ~ MR. AND MRS. PRINCE. Part of the First Wednesdays series. Pursuing what would become the cornerstone of the American Dream, Lucy Terry and Abijah Prince, an accomplished African American couple in pre-Civil War New England, stood their ground in the face of bigoted neighbors. Author Gretchen Holbrook Gerzina reveals the true story of a remarkable couple whose lives contained the paradoxes of slavery in our region. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 7:00 p.m. Call Jerry Carbone, (802) 254-5290.

BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES: BLUE COLLAR AMERICA. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum-wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Geraldine Pittman de Batlle. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Westminster West Public Library and Butterfield Library. Thursdays, 7:00 p.m. Call Beverly Major, (802) 387-4682. 
- January 10, Philip Levine's WHAT WORK IS. Putney, Westminster West Public Library.
- February 14, Don Snyder's THE CLIFF WALK: A MEMOIR OF A JOB LOST AND A LIFE FOUND. Westminster, Butterfield Library.

BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES: MYSTERIOUS LENS ON AMERICAN CULTURE. In these mysteries, mayhem and murder play out against a cultural/ethnic backdrop-illuminating more than simply whodunnit. Led by Francette B. Cerulli. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Grafton Public Library. Grafton Public Library, Mondays, 7:00 p.m. Call Linda Montecalvo, (802) 843-1444.
- January 7, Sherman Alexie's INDIAN KILLER
- February 4, Faye Kellerman's RITUAL BATH

BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES: FOUNDERS & PRESIDENTS OF THE PAST. This series, part of an ongoing discussion program leading up to the 2008 Presidential election, combines biographies and histories of four of our founding fathers, as well as four 20th century Presidents Post WWII. Delve into the lives and leadership of these influential Americans. Led by Deborah L. Luskin. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, Wednesdays, 7:00 p.m. Call Jerry Carbone, (802) 254-5290.
- January 9, Joseph J. Ellis' FOUNDING BROTHERS: THE REVOLUTIONARY GENERATION. 
- February 13, Richard Brookhiser's FOUNDING FATHER

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
WINDSOR COUNTY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16 ~ BOOK DISCUSSION: IVAN DOIG'S THIS HOUSE OF SKY. Part of the West by Southwest series. What are the myths about the West? What effect have these myths had upon those who travel to and live there? Led by Rachael Cohen. A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Hartland Public Library. Hartland Public Library, 6:30 p.m. Call Theresa Gregory, (802) 436-2473.

BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES: PEOPLE AND OTHER ANIMALS. Using novels and works of natural history, this series stimulates discussion on the intricate, differing ways that humans relate to creatures of other species. How do human and animal societies resemble each other? How have animals come to symbolize certain qualities to humans? How do they live in our imaginations as opposed to the way they live in life? A Vermont Humanities Council event hosted by Springfield Town Library. Springfield Town Library, Thursdays, 7:00 p.m. Call Nancy Tusinski, (802) 885-3108.
- January 10, Richard Nelson's HEART AND BLOOD: LIVING WITH DEER IN AMERICA. Led by Jim Schley.
- February 7, Jeffrey Mason and Susan McCarthy's WHEN ELEPHANTS WEEP. Led by Patricia S. Norton.

# # #

---End of Forwarded Message---

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

April 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996
March 1996
February 1996
December 1995
November 1995
October 1995
September 1995
August 1995
July 1995
June 1995
May 1995
April 1995
March 1995

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LIST.UVM.EDU

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager