VTBIRD Archives

January 2008

VTBIRD@LIST.UVM.EDU

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Subject:
From:
Dayle Ann <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
Vermont Birds <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Mon, 21 Jan 2008 12:33:53 -0500
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Agree that many people may suddenly develop a sensitivity, something to
guard against. But my brothers are not sensitive either, nor others on my
father's side of the family. I understand that sensitivity has a genetic
componant, and that seems to be the case wit us, because we were exposed to
it routinely. Logged over hills where I grew up, and an abandoned pasture
on property behind my grandparents' farm were infested with poison oak (same
thing in shrub form) and we rarely had so much as a bump. Wonder if being
mixed native american is a factor.

Last year I was cleaning out some Virginia creeper from behind my barn
minus gloves and bare-armed. Later as I was looking at the pile, realized
that some of it was poison ivy-- hadn't been paying attention. No rash. I
don't worry about it, though I'll probably wear gloves next time if I notice
any ivy. Irony is that the year before I'd cleared the same area of
common buckthorn (invasive alien), and probably inadvertently opened the
area for the creeper and poison ivy. Wonder what the birds will plant back
there for me this year?

Apologies for being off-topic.

Dayle Ann
Brandon

 

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