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VTBIRD  June 2011

VTBIRD June 2011

Subject:

Re: First Brood requests

From:

Chip Darmstadt <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Vermont Birds <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 1 Jun 2011 12:23:47 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (450 lines)

Hello Jeff et al.

On a related note (plant and animal phenologies). The Fairbanks Museum will
be presenting information on a new citizen science project, tonight
(Wednesday, June 1, 7pm) at the North Branch Nature Center in Montpelier. If
you're interested in tracking when plants flower, when bird nest or migrate,
and/or when butterflies emerge throughout the summer, you should check out
this program.

Best, Chip

Fairbanks Community of Observers
Wednesday, June 1, 7:00 p.m.
The Fairbanks Museum and Planetarium presents the Fairbanks Community of
Observers to promote citizen science throughout Vermont. By recording the
natural phenomena of birds, butterflies, weather, and wildflowers, our
observers will collect sharable data to look for changing trends locally.


Chip Darmstadt
Executive Director
North Branch Nature Center
713 Elm Street
Montpelier, VT 05602
802-229-6206
[log in to unmask]
www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Jeffrey Allen
Sent: Thursday, May 26, 2011 5:29 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [VTBIRD] First Brood requests

Dear Birders,
I am noticing some strange things in the microcosm of our 3 acre forest in
regards to cycles and timing in the nature of things with this year's
weather?
HUGE predaceous Diving Beetle larvae roaming.  VERY large Blue Jay families,
etc. Blooming coming late and fast and aligned (Lilacs early, Apple blossoms
late and long).
My bees putting on massive amounts of honey this week and only this week.
I know that this might NOT be the venue for this but I would be interested
in a list serve where folks are tracking nature (mammals, soil, weather,
plants, birds, ALL) in general and commenting on it.
Anyone know of such a thing?  I am thinking poet observer meets the Calendar
Log in the front of Northern Woodlands magazine meets Pfeiffer in "For the
Birds" meets Bob Spear, Susan Morse, etc....
Anyone getting what I am saying?  Write me off list if you are interested,
curious or know of such a thing.

With all the rain I am curious what you have seen, heard, noticed.
And on here.....I think it is most appropriate to keep it to the birds.

So, I fell asleep in the sun by the Winooski yesterday on my lunch break and
woke up eye to eye with a very surprised Cormorant in the water with a fish
in its mouth.
Other than that, Northern Oriole, Phoebe, Ovenbird, GH Owl, Chipping
Sparrrow.
My wrens seem to have disappeared.


Much regards,
Jeffrey Allen
Montpelier
On May 26, 2011, at 12:00 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system wrote:

> There are 13 messages totalling 374 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
>  1. Eastern Wood Peewee
>  2. NY Times article on owls
>  3. warblers,etc
>  4. Taft Corners Loon
>  5. Cliff Swallows, Manchester
>  6. in Milton
>  7. Evening Grosbeak in Waterbury!
>  8. Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Benson - May 25
>  9. Blue Winged Warblers
> 10. Wren nest
> 11. Fwd: wren nest (2)
> 12. Shorebirds, shorebirds, shorebirds ....... Ferrisburg
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 25 May 2011 07:21:40 -0400
> From:    Kathy Leonard <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Eastern Wood Peewee
> 
> The Eastern Wood Peewee takes up the rear of the songbird migration at my=
> 
> location.  Hearing his two-part song yesterday put a period on that sente=
> nce
> for me.=20=20
> 
> The male hummingbird "gatekeeper" is acting more benevolent this year,
> allowing others to join him at the feeder (I've never seen that here).  A=
> t
> one point there were two males and two females sitting around the table! =
> I
> wish our leaders could follow his lead, if you don't mind me saying so.
> 
> Kathy Leonard
> Randolph Center
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 25 May 2011 07:22:44 -0400
> From:    Barbara Brosnan <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: NY Times article on owls
> 
> Thanks Scott.  Interesting info.  My thanks also go out to those intrepid
> field scientists.
> Barbara B.
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Scott
> Sainsbury
> Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 2011 11:41 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: [VTBIRD] NY Times article on owls
> 
> http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/24/science/24owl.html?_r=1
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 25 May 2011 13:51:51 +0000
> From:    Sue Wetmore <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: warblers,etc
> 
> Of interest was a kingbird attacking a crow who was not happy about the
ass=
> ault---much squawking!=C2=A0 Also a wood pewee singing from an unusual=20
> 
> spot---not in the deep woods as I customarily find them. Perhaps it also
is=
> wanting sunshine.=20
> 
> 
> 
> Sue Wetmore=20
> ----- Forwarded Message -----=20
> From: [log in to unmask]
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 9:47:27 AM=20
> Subject: eBird Report - Brandon Pearl St , 5/25/11=20
> 
> 
> 
> Location: =C2=A0 =C2=A0 Brandon Pearl St=20
> Observation date: =C2=A0 =C2=A0 5/25/11=20
> Number of species: =C2=A0 =C2=A0 70=20
> 
> Canada Goose =C2=A0 =C2=A0 10=20
> Wood Duck =C2=A0 =C2=A0 2=20
> Mallard =C2=A0 =C2=A0 7=20
> Ruffed Grouse =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Green Heron =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Killdeer =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Wilson's Snipe =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Mourning Dove =C2=A0 =C2=A0 5=20
> Chimney Swift =C2=A0 =C2=A0 2=20
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Belted Kingfisher =C2=A0 =C2=A0 2=20
> Red-bellied Woodpecker =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker =C2=A0 =C2=A0 4=20
> Downy Woodpecker =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Hairy Woodpecker =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Pileated Woodpecker =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Eastern Wood-Pewee =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Alder Flycatcher =C2=A0 =C2=A0 2=20
> Eastern Phoebe =C2=A0 =C2=A0 2=20
> Great Crested Flycatcher =C2=A0 =C2=A0 4=20
> Eastern Kingbird =C2=A0 =C2=A0 2=20
> Warbling Vireo =C2=A0 =C2=A0 5=20
> Red-eyed Vireo =C2=A0 =C2=A0 5=20
> Blue Jay =C2=A0 =C2=A0 6=20
> American Crow =C2=A0 =C2=A0 4=20
> Tree Swallow =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Bank Swallow =C2=A0 =C2=A0 2=20
> Barn Swallow =C2=A0 =C2=A0 4=20
> Black-capped Chickadee =C2=A0 =C2=A0 4=20
> Brown Creeper =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Carolina Wren =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> House Wren =C2=A0 =C2=A0 3=20
> Eastern Bluebird =C2=A0 =C2=A0 2=20
> Veery =C2=A0 =C2=A0 5=20
> Hermit Thrush =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Wood Thrush =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> American Robin =C2=A0 =C2=A0 11=20
> Gray Catbird =C2=A0 =C2=A0 6=20
> Brown Thrasher =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> European Starling =C2=A0 =C2=A0 26=20
> Cedar Waxwing =C2=A0 =C2=A0 6=20
> Blue-winged Warbler =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Nashville Warbler =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Yellow Warbler =C2=A0 =C2=A0 3=20
> Chestnut-sided Warbler =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Black-throated Blue Warbler =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Black-throated Green Warbler =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Black-and-white Warbler =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> American Redstart =C2=A0 =C2=A0 6=20
> Ovenbird =C2=A0 =C2=A0 5=20
> Northern Waterthrush =C2=A0 =C2=A0 4=20
> Common Yellowthroat =C2=A0 =C2=A0 16=20
> Canada Warbler =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Chipping Sparrow =C2=A0 =C2=A0 2=20
> Savannah Sparrow =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Song Sparrow =C2=A0 =C2=A0 5=20
> Swamp Sparrow =C2=A0 =C2=A0 2=20
> White-throated Sparrow =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Scarlet Tanager =C2=A0 =C2=A0 3=20
> Northern Cardinal =C2=A0 =C2=A0 3=20
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Indigo Bunting =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Bobolink =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> Red-winged Blackbird =C2=A0 =C2=A0 12=20
> Common Grackle =C2=A0 =C2=A0 2=20
> Brown-headed Cowbird =C2=A0 =C2=A0 4=20
> Baltimore Oriole =C2=A0 =C2=A0 4=20
> House Finch =C2=A0 =C2=A0 6=20
> American Goldfinch =C2=A0 =C2=A0 4=20
> House Sparrow =C2=A0 =C2=A0 1=20
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v2(http://ebird.org)=20
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 25 May 2011 07:25:11 -0700
> From:    Carl Runge <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Taft Corners Loon
> 
> The beautiful adult  Common Loon is still present this morning at the
retention 
> pond between Shaws and Friendlys at Taft Corners in Williston,  swimming
and 
> vocalizing, but looking very much out of place. I think he should be able
to 
> take off if he decides to. According to Birds of NA online by the Cornell
Lab of 
> Ornithology, loons require a takeoff distance of up to 200 meters, but
with high 
> winds to fly into, as little as 30 meters.  This pond is about 125-130
meters 
> long, situated in a north-south direction, with better clearance to the
north.  
> So with a decent north wind, he should be able to get airborne.
> 
> Carl
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 25 May 2011 10:39:34 -0400
> From:    Jim Phillips <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Cliff Swallows, Manchester
> 
> The Cliff Swallows have returned to the Manchester Rec Park - only a few
at 
> this point, but perhaps more will be arriving. 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 25 May 2011 14:17:57 -0400
> From:    Linda Robinson <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: in Milton
> 
> another first for our yard, a lone Northern Flicker, working it's way
around bushes on our side lawn.
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 25 May 2011 14:28:16 -0400
> From:    Graham Bates <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Evening Grosbeak in Waterbury!
> 
> On Sunday and again on Monday we were treated to a single male Evening
> Grosbeak at our feeder in Waterbury.  Beautiful sight!
> 
> Graham
> Waterbury, VT
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 25 May 2011 14:26:13 -0700
> From:    Susan Elliott <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Benson - May 25
> 
> During a drive over to Benson and West Haven today, we heard a
Yellow-bille=
> d Cuckoo loud and clear (in Benson). =0A=A0=0AAlso, between the two towns
w=
> e observed five=A0Golden-winged Warblers (three seen,=A0two heard) and one
=
> Brewster's hybrid.=0A=A0=0ASue and Marv Elliott
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 25 May 2011 17:28:31 -0400
> From:    Robert Phillips <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Blue Winged Warblers
> 
> When I found myself in Chittenden County today I had a chance to revisit
Geprag Community Park in Hinesburg and relocate two Blue-Winged Warblers
singing to each other across a clearing.  Three chestnut sided warblers were
busily singing away as well. 
> 
> Bob Phillips
> Barre
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 25 May 2011 16:35:52 -0700
> From:    Carl Runge <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Wren nest
> 
> Monday: put up the wren house
> Tuesday am: heard House Wren in yard for first time this year
> Wednesday pm:  wren building nest in house
> 
> No time wasted.
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 25 May 2011 20:10:35 -0400
> From:    Patti Haynes <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Fwd: wren nest
> 
> Hi Carl,
> 
> I think male House Wrens build many nests before they finally settle in. I
> have 2 wren houses and 2 bluebird houses in the yard, and they seem to
bring
> sticks to all of them. The female is the one to decide, it seems.
> 
> Happy birding in the elusive spring sun.
> Patti
> Mad Birder
> Moretown
> 
> PS: I tried to send this to you directly, with no luck. Apologies to those
> who worry about these things.
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 25 May 2011 17:54:49 -0700
> From:    Carl Runge <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Fwd: wren nest
> 
> I agree.  I think the wrens in my yard build several dummy nests, but they

> always seem to end up in the house.  I'm always amazed when I clean the
house 
> out in the fall just how many sticks they have crammed into it.  Very 
> industrious critters.
> 
> Carl
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ________________________________
> From: Patti Haynes <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Sent: Wed, May 25, 2011 8:10:35 PM
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Fwd: wren nest
> 
> Hi Carl,
> 
> I think male House Wrens build many nests before they finally settle in. I
> have 2 wren houses and 2 bluebird houses in the yard, and they seem to
bring
> sticks to all of them. The female is the one to decide, it seems.
> 
> Happy birding in the elusive spring sun.
> Patti
> Mad Birder
> Moretown
> 
> PS: I tried to send this to you directly, with no luck. Apologies to those
> who worry about these things.
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 25 May 2011 21:20:43 -0400
> From:    Ian Worley <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Shorebirds, shorebirds, shorebirds ....... Ferrisburg
> 
> This late afternoon Jim Mead, Ted Murin, Steve Antell, and I 
> coincidentally converged from the south at the edge of flooded lands on 
> Hawkins Road, Ferrisburg.  Much of the water laps into fall-plowed 
> fields with all their wet or submerged furrows creating a complex of 
> bare soil and watery shallows.  The more we looked the more we saw ... 
> shorebirds everywhere popping up from hollows, foraging in shallows, 
> preening on clods, playing peekaboo from behind grassy clumps, and 
> generally paying us no heed whatsoever.
> 
> The water over the road is less deep than the last several weeks, and 
> required little wading to get to an excellent viewing vantage both east 
> and west of the road.  Prior visits, because of the higher water, did 
> not reveal the more extensive plowed field with submerged margins east 
> of the road ... but thanks to Jim's wading initiative it was happily 
> discovered.
> 
> Eleven species of shorebirds were located along with other species 
> associated with the flooded landscape.  We were much delighted by each 
> new species found.  This kept us well excited, and beyond some personal 
> curfews.  The list is below.  Terrestrial species were not tallied.  
> Short-billed Dowitchers and Pectoral Sandpipers have also been seen 
> recently from this location.
> 
> Reporting for the others,
> 
> Ian
> =========================
> 
> Hawkins Road, Addison, US-VT
> May 25, 2011
> Comments:     Observers were Jim Mead, Steve Antell, Ted Murin, Ian Worley
> 19 species
> 
> Black-bellied Plover  4
> Semipalmated Plover  17
> Killdeer  1
> Spotted Sandpiper  4
> Solitary Sandpiper  1
> Greater Yellowlegs  1
> Lesser Yellowlegs  3
> Semipalmated Sandpiper  3
> Least Sandpiper  62
> White-rumped Sandpiper  3
> Dunlin  8
> 
> Canada Goose  18
> American Black Duck  1
> Mallard  12
> Great Blue Heron  2
> Green Heron  1
> Osprey  1
> Ring-billed Gull  35
> Caspian Tern  1
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v2 (http://ebird.org)
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 24 May 2011 to 25 May 2011 (#2011-146)
> *************************************************************

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