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VTBIRD  February 2013

VTBIRD February 2013

Subject:

Re: VTBIRD Digest - 31 Jan 2013 to 1 Feb 2013 (#2013-33)

From:

Tom and Joy <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Vermont Birds <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sat, 2 Feb 2013 07:18:27 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (402 lines)

Why don't you try a water gun.  Most cats hate water on their fur and after squirting them a few times they get the idea to stay away.  You could also flavor the water with lemon and they hate that also.

On Feb 2, 2013, at 12:01 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system wrote:

> There are 11 messages totaling 450 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
>  1. Cats and Birds (3)
>  2. FW: New Cats Indoors Program Officer
>  3. ABC cats' notice
>  4. cat issue (2)
>  5. How owls swivel their heads
>  6. Red-shouldered Hawk at Woodside NA
>  7. Huge Numbers of Bohemians in Shelburne
>  8. sad pine grosbeak sighting in Bennington
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date:    Fri, 1 Feb 2013 11:48:25 -0500
> From:    Thomas Berriman <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Cats and Birds
>
> Subject: birds and cats
> Date: Thu Jan 31 2013 16:31 pm
> From: jeshawks AT shoreham.net
>
> Thomas, given the really impressive background you just spelled out, I
> wonder if you might explain something in your previous post that
> disturbed me and some other readers far more than throwing stuff at
> intruding cats, and that's your method of choice for killing mice, glue
> traps and drowning.
>
> I assume there's a reason you do it this way.  I've struggled against
> the necessity of killing mice and found no way around it, but I settled
> on snap traps because they kill quickly and reasonably humanely.  Are
> those impractical for you in some way?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Jane
>
> Hi Jane
>
> Glue traps are not my first choice in dealing with mice but sometimes that is the only thing that works if Snap traps have failed. A few years ago a mouse was eating the wiring in the walls of my house (this can cause fire and loss of human life) After it somehow avoided death in a snap trap I was left with having to use any method that worked. The end result once the mouse is lodged in the glue is either smacking the mouse with a hammer or dropping him into a bucket of water.
>
> When we think about humane killing (there's an interesting concept) I guess every species would like it to be swift and painless. That doesn't always happen in the natural world. But you are right that given the choice most of the time I would use a snap trap or a 'havaheart' trap which may or may not work 100% of the time. So much depends upon the circumatances.
>
> Still given what is humane and inhumane (and every person has their own concept or guidelines for how they define that) Many, many people 'love' animals as I do yet when I ask them what animal they cooked for their family dinner last night or what can of processed animal food they opened and fed their pet cat or dog today, what they really mean is I love my pet even if it means several other animal species must be .....what humanly harvested.
>
> I understand this surprisingly, My choice is 99% of the time to try to do no harm. I have found in 20 years I get along quite well without having to 'harvest ' many of those other species.
>
> Tom
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Fri, 1 Feb 2013 09:23:03 -0800
> From:    v_t_frost <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Cats and Birds
>
> Are you kidding? By all means 'throw stuff' at intruding cats: they come into my cat-free yard and feeder area from both sides, and it only took a couple of real stones banging the ground near them to get these whip-smart beauties to back off every time they see me. In fact, just opening the door works now. It's not 100% but it's a detente of sorts, albeit not of the sentimentalist's variety.
>
> I started this illuminating and impassioned discussion with my bbc post, have learned a lot and express gratitude to the list, while noting that the degree of righteousness expressed remains my own favorite indicator of the value of any argument.
>
>
> Veer
>
> ---- On Fri, 01 Feb 2013 08:48:25 -0800 Thomas Berriman&lt;[log in to unmask]&gt; wrote ----
>
>
> Subject: birds and cats
> Date: Thu Jan 31 2013 16:31 pm
> From: jeshawks AT shoreham.net
>
> Thomas, given the really impressive background you just spelled out, I
> wonder if you might explain something in your previous post that
> disturbed me and some other readers far more than throwing stuff at
> intruding cats, and that's your method of choice for killing mice, glue
> traps and drowning.
>
> I assume there's a reason you do it this way. I've struggled against
> the necessity of killing mice and found no way around it, but I settled
> on snap traps because they kill quickly and reasonably humanely. Are
> those impractical for you in some way?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Jane
>
> Hi Jane
>
> Glue traps are not my first choice in dealing with mice but sometimes that is the only thing that works if Snap traps have failed. A few years ago a mouse was eating the wiring in the walls of my house (this can cause fire and loss of human life) After it somehow avoided death in a snap trap I was left with having to use any method that worked. The end result once the mouse is lodged in the glue is either smacking the mouse with a hammer or dropping him into a bucket of water.
>
> When we think about humane killing (there's an interesting concept) I guess every species would like it to be swift and painless. That doesn't always happen in the natural world. But you are right that given the choice most of the time I would use a snap trap or a 'havaheart' trap which may or may not work 100% of the time. So much depends upon the circumatances.
>
> Still given what is humane and inhumane (and every person has their own concept or guidelines for how they define that) Many, many people 'love' animals as I do yet when I ask them what animal they cooked for their family dinner last night or what can of processed animal food they opened and fed their pet cat or dog today, what they really mean is I love my pet even if it means several other animal species must be .....what humanly harvested.
>
> I understand this surprisingly, My choice is 99% of the time to try to do no harm. I have found in 20 years I get along quite well without having to 'harvest ' many of those other species.
>
> Tom
>
>
>
> ____________________________________
> posted by Veer Frost, Passumpsic
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Fri, 1 Feb 2013 12:28:11 -0500
> From:    Jane Stein <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Cats and Birds
>
> Thanks for explaining this.  I totally understand the emergency need
> (sometimes it genuinely is us or them).  It sounded in your previous
> post like that was your method of choice for dealing with them, and I'm
> glad to learn it is not.
>
> I deeply admire your commitment, which is what puzzled me.
>
> Jane
>
>
>
> On 2/1/2013 11:48 AM, Thomas Berriman wrote:
>> Subject: birds and cats
>> Date: Thu Jan 31 2013 16:31 pm
>> From: jeshawks AT shoreham.net
>>
>> Thomas, given the really impressive background you just spelled out, I
>> wonder if you might explain something in your previous post that
>> disturbed me and some other readers far more than throwing stuff at
>> intruding cats, and that's your method of choice for killing mice, glue
>> traps and drowning.
>>
>> I assume there's a reason you do it this way.  I've struggled against
>> the necessity of killing mice and found no way around it, but I settled
>> on snap traps because they kill quickly and reasonably humanely.  Are
>> those impractical for you in some way?
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Jane
>>
>> Hi Jane
>>
>> Glue traps are not my first choice in dealing with mice but sometimes that is the only thing that works if Snap traps have failed. A few years ago a mouse was eating the wiring in the walls of my house (this can cause fire and loss of human life) After it somehow avoided death in a snap trap I was left with having to use any method that worked. The end result once the mouse is lodged in the glue is either smacking the mouse with a hammer or dropping him into a bucket of water.
>>
>> When we think about humane killing (there's an interesting concept) I guess every species would like it to be swift and painless. That doesn't always happen in the natural world. But you are right that given the choice most of the time I would use a snap trap or a 'havaheart' trap which may or may not work 100% of the time. So much depends upon the circumatances.
>>
>> Still given what is humane and inhumane (and every person has their own concept or guidelines for how they define that) Many, many people 'love' animals as I do yet when I ask them what animal they cooked for their family dinner last night or what can of processed animal food they opened and fed their pet cat or dog today, what they really mean is I love my pet even if it means several other animal species must be .....what humanly harvested.
>>
>> I understand this surprisingly, My choice is 99% of the time to try to do no harm. I have found in 20 years I get along quite well without having to 'harvest ' many of those other species.
>>
>> Tom
>>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Fri, 1 Feb 2013 17:45:25 +0000
> From:    Marsha Booker <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: FW: New Cats Indoors Program Officer
>
> Hi all:  I just got this email from the American Bird Conservancy.  In light of all the discussion recently on the listserve about the adverse effect of outdoor cats on birds, I thought you would all be interested in getting this information.Marsha Booker
>
> Date: Thu, 31 Jan 2013 15:14:23 -0500
> From: [log in to unmask]
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: New Cats Indoors Program Officer
>
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>            Hello!
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>            My name is Grant Sizemore, and I am the new Cats Indoors Program Officer at American Bird Conservancy (ABC). I am very excited to join ABC and to be working on a crucial frontier of wildlife conservation: the impacts of feral and free-ranging domestic cats. I am thrilled to be a part of ABC’s long-standing and vocal commitment to science-based conservation on this issue. Although new to ABC, I am not new to the cats issue. As an employee at The Wildlife Society, I had the opportunity to spearhead an outreach and education campaign with the public and to strengthen coalition bonds. I also have a diverse array wildlife conservation experiences, including research, education, and policy.
>            As part of my work at ABC, I want to revive the Cats Indoors listserv. This listserv can be an excellent resource for news, updates, and action alerts. I sincerely hope that you will continue your support of ABC’s efforts to reduce the negative impacts of feral and free-ranging cats and will continue to subscribe to the Cats Indoors listserv.
>            Please feel free to contact me with questions, comments, or concerns. My email address is [log in to unmask] To post to the listserv, send emails to [log in to unmask] Please keep posts relevant to Cats Indoors and remember that posts will be seen by all members.
>
>            Breaking News - New study identifies cats as top threat to birds
>
>            A newly released study by the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service estimates that domestic cats kill 1.4-3.7 BILLION birds annually in the United States. This scientifically rigorous and systematic study identifies un-owned cats (i.e., barn cats, strays, cats in outdoor colonies, and ferals) are responsible for ~69% of these kills. Additionally, the study estimates that cats kill 6.9-20.7 BILLION mammals annually in the United State and that 89% of this mortality is caused by un-owned cats.
>            This study has received a lot of attention from national and international media (e.g. CNN, BBC, NPR, NBC). Check out the ABC press release!
>
>
>
>            Grant Sizemore
>
>            Program Officer
>
>            American Bird Conservancy
>
>            1731 Connecticut Ave., NW
>
>            Washington, DC 20009
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>            Phone: 202-234-7181 ext. 211
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>                    American Bird Conservancy is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization that conserves native birds and their habitats throughout the Americas.
>
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>                    Click here to unsubscribe from BirdWire
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> 		 	   		
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Fri, 1 Feb 2013 17:49:03 +0000
> From:    Marsha Booker <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: ABC cats' notice
>
> To all:  Please scroll down at my previous ABC message to get the text I forwarded because there's a large blank space after my message.  Thank you.Marsha. 		 	   		
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Fri, 1 Feb 2013 12:52:22 -0500
> From:    anthony <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: cat issue
>
> OK -
>
> Here's my one and only comment on this.
>
> The domestic cat is an introduced invasive species and has never been
> part of the Western hemisphere ecosystem. If you choose to
> dismiss the impact on native birds, you might consider this:
> http://cats.about.com/cs/parasiticdisease/a/seaotters.htm.
>
> I regret that I don't have the temperament to engage in a dialogue on
> this topic as I'm rigid in my opinion that cats belong indoors
> for the welfare of our wildlife and of the pet cat.
>
> Anthony Hill
> S. Hadley, MA
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Fri, 1 Feb 2013 18:09:55 +0000
> From:    Kate Olgiati <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: cat issue
>
> Please, can we finish the cat issue for a while??
> Kate OlgiatiBarnard
>
>> Date: Fri, 1 Feb 2013 12:52:22 -0500
>> From: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: [VTBIRD] cat issue
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>>
>> OK -
>>
>> Here's my one and only comment on this.
>>
>> The domestic cat is an introduced invasive species and has never been
>> part of the Western hemisphere ecosystem. If you choose to
>> dismiss the impact on native birds, you might consider this:
>> http://cats.about.com/cs/parasiticdisease/a/seaotters.htm.
>>
>> I regret that I don't have the temperament to engage in a dialogue on
>> this topic as I'm rigid in my opinion that cats belong indoors
>> for the welfare of our wildlife and of the pet cat.
>>
>> Anthony Hill
>> S. Hadley, MA
> 		 	   		
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Fri, 1 Feb 2013 14:43:40 -0500
> From:    Miriam Lawrence <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: How owls swivel their heads
>
> For those interested in the physical structures that allow owls to do what
> they do:
>
> http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-21279609
>
> --
> Miriam Lawrence
> Monkton Ridge
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Fri, 1 Feb 2013 17:46:14 -0500
> From:    Bruce MacPherson <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Red-shouldered Hawk at Woodside NA
>
> I am not sure whether this hawk is a short distance migrator or a permanent resident. In any event I got a close look at a Red-shouldered Hawk at the Woodside NA in Essex Junction this afternoon. This area hosts nesting Red-shouldered Hawks later in the year. Seems early to see one, but last year my first sighting of a Red-shouldered Hawk at Woodside was Feb. 18 and I think someone else reported one there earlier in February.
>
>
> Bruce MacPherson
> South Burlington
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Fri, 1 Feb 2013 21:36:36 -0500
> From:    Josh Phillips <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Huge Numbers of Bohemians in Shelburne
>
> My son and I were on our way out to Meach Cove to look at ducks (too cold today for a 2-year old as it turns out) when we spotted a huge flock of Bohemian Waxwings along Bostwick Road.  I estimated 400 in the field, and my photo later revealed 467.  That number actually makes for a conservative count because at the time of the photo there were another 75-100 birds out of view in the ditch below the trees.  In the trees they were so densely packed they were tough to count even after the fact.
>
> There are a few poor photos here:
>
> http://www.scriberule.org/251birds/?p=779
>
> but you get a sense of the scale of the spectacle.  If I see this many Bohemians in total for the rest of my life I'll feel blessed.
>
> No cats were observed.
>
> Josh Phillips
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sat, 2 Feb 2013 04:09:43 +0000
> From:    Eric Seyferth <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: sad pine grosbeak sighting in Bennington
>
> Pine grosbeak found dead in road at junction of Mt Anthony Rd and Rte 9W
>
>
> Eric Seyferth
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 31 Jan 2013 to 1 Feb 2013 (#2013-33)
> ***********************************************************
>

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