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December 2013

VTBIRD@LIST.UVM.EDU

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Vermont Birds <[log in to unmask]>
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Tue, 31 Dec 2013 15:47:36 -0500
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Vermont Birds <[log in to unmask]>
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Ronald Payne <[log in to unmask]>
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An article about the study on Emerald Ash BorerĀ and Woodpeckers:
http://news.uic.edu/emerald-ash-borer-may-have-met-its-match

  --
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT

On Tue, 31 Dec 2013 15:41:08 -0500, John Snell <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
As many know, the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) is rapidly expanding its 
invasion of the country. Readers should be aware that 95% of the new 
infestations reported resulted from the transport of infested firewood 
from other areas. Not transporting firewood is the number one way to 
slow the spread. 
>
> Though EAB is not yet in Vermont, there are major infestations on 
> four sides and our days are, unfortunately, numbered. The impact in 
> other areas has been huge and we have every reason to expect the same 
> in Vermont where 20% of the forest is ash. Many communities 
> throughout the state, including Montpelier, are developing plans to 
> deal with the invasion. 
>
> A recently published article suggests that woodpeckers and bark 
> foraging birds may play a significant, adaptive role in controlling 
> the insect once it has become established. 
>
>
> Still learning to see,
>
> John Snell
>
> http://www.eyeimagein.com
> http://www.stilllearningtosee.com
>
>

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