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VTBIRD  March 2016

VTBIRD March 2016

Subject:

Re: Mega-rarity in Hollis, NH: Redwing (Turdus iliacus)

From:

Scott Spangenberg <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Vermont Birds <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 15 Mar 2016 17:29:26 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (35 lines)

People have seen the Redwing in the morning, at 3-4PM in the afternoon, and at 6:30 PM.  If you can only choose one time frame, I would suggest early to mid morning (10ish).  Park on Jeff Smith Way, being careful to park off the pavement.  DO NOT park anywhere on Love Lane or the road to the high school.

Do check Taj’s link to the NH Birds list; Steve Mirick has posted some observations that you may find helpful.

The bird was first found Sunday morning at about 10:30 at the baseball field, which is at the intersection of Love Lane and Jeff Smith Way, by Chris McPherson.

At least two people got to see the Redwing Sunday evening at 6:30PM.

A number of us (50+) got to see the Redwing 7:30-9:00AM Monday morning, again at the baseball field and in the trees brush between the scoreboard and Love Lane.  PLEASE do not walk in trees and brush here. The Robins and Redwing take sanctuary here when the Coop and Sharpy strafe the baseball field.

At 3:45 Monday at least two people got to see the bird fly across Love Lane below the ballfields, where the track/football field is found on the left side of Love Lane.
No one saw the bird Monday evening.

At least 75 people saw the bird on the track/football field this morning (Tuesday) starting at 8:10AM.  

It was last seen in the field across Love Lane from the track/football field at 10AM today.  I am not aware of any reports since then.

The Redwing is associating with American Robins, and there are thousands of Robins in the area.  (The flights of Robins overhead at sunrise and dusk are quite impressive.  Many seem to be just passing through.)  

The Robins will have their belly above the grass when they are in the baseball field or the track/football field. The Redwing’s belly will be obscured by the tops of the grass blades.  At a distance, it can be picked out by its smaller size, and slightly darker back. At a somewhat closer distance, the pale eyestripe is easier to perceive than the streaks on the belly or the rusty patches on the sides.  In flight, where you might not have a Robin next to it for size comparison, you may be able to pick it out by the comparatively short tail.  May.  If you are wicked lucky, you may be able to see the rich, rusty red wing linings that give the bird its name.


Scott Spangenberg
Amherst, NH

> On Mar 14, 2016, at 10:02 AM, Taj Schottland <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> Yesterday morning a birder found a Redwing in Hollis, NH. It was later
> refound just before dusk, and is being seen again today.
> 
> For more information see the NH bird list:
> http://birding.aba.org/maillist/NH
> 
> Good luck to those who try for it!

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