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VTBIRD  July 2017

VTBIRD July 2017

Subject:

Pine Grosbeak

From:

J J Allen <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Vermont Birds <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 11 Jul 2017 06:05:44 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (530 lines)

Had a lovely encounter with a pair of Pine Grosbeaks on Sodom Pond Road in Adamant on my run last evening.

> On Jul 11, 2017, at 00:00, VTBIRD automatic digest system <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> There are 9 messages totaling 599 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
>  1. VTBIRD Digest - 8 Jul 2017 to 9 Jul 2017 (#2017-170)
>  2. Loons Silver Lake - Leicester (101 acres), Jul 9, 2017
>  3. Indigo buntingBrandon Pearl St, Jul 9, 2017
>  4. Falcon at UVM
>  5. Tree Frog who thinks he's a bird
>  6. Spotted Sandpipettes (4)
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Mon, 10 Jul 2017 06:21:00 -0400
> From:    carolclyde <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: VTBIRD Digest - 8 Jul 2017 to 9 Jul 2017 (#2017-170)
> 
> Regarding frog using nest box.  A neighbor in South Alburgh has a tree frog in a nest box near her porch.
> Carol Yarnell
> 
> 
> Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S™ III, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
> 
> <div>-------- Original message --------</div><div>From: VTBIRD automatic digest system <[log in to unmask]> </div><div>Date:07/10/2017  12:00 AM  (GMT-05:00) </div><div>To: [log in to unmask] </div><div>Subject: VTBIRD Digest - 8 Jul 2017 to 9 Jul 2017 (#2017-170) </div><div>
> </div>There are 7 messages totaling 251 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
>  1. Jay Peak Friday BBQ, Tram, and Bicknell’s Thrush (2)
>  2. Tree Frog who thinks he's a bird (2)
>  3. American Kestrels
>  4. Peregrine at UVM
>  5. Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sun, 9 Jul 2017 07:56:02 -0400
> From:    Bob Stymeist <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Jay Peak Friday BBQ, Tram, and Bicknell’s Thrush
> 
> Vermont birders
> 
> Jay Peak in the Northeast Kingdom is home to Bicknell’s Thrush and other high elevation birds. Access to the summit of Jay Peak, about 3,800 feet in elevation, can be made with its tram, which operates from 10 AM to 5 PM during the summer, except for Fridays, when it operates until dusk. The Friday later tram rides afford birders the opportunity to look for Bicknell’s Thrush.
> 
> We went to the Jay Peak resort, which offers a Friday night BBQ and tram ride, all for the price of $24.95 per person, tram ride included. We arrived early to eat a delicious BBQ buffet (all you can eat) and then took the 6:30 tram to the summit. Once there, we walked down a ski trail only about 100 yards before we started hearing Bicknell’s Thrush. With additional spishing, we called in a total of four Bicknell’s (three of which were seen well) ,also we heard at least four singing Swainson’s Thrush, several Yellow-rumped Warblers, Dark-eyed Juncoes, Ruby crowned Kinglets and White-throated Sparrows though no Blackpoll Warblers, another target of the evening. We walked back to the tram and took the 7:30 tram back down to the base lodge, where we enjoyed s’mores by an outdoor fire pit. It was a wonderful evening and an exceedingly easy way to reach Bicknells Thrush territory.
> 
> The Friday specials at the Jay Peak resort run throughout the summer and we thought Vermont birders might be interested in knowing about it in the event that you wan to try for Bicknell’s and Blackpolls. We do caution that last night, we were met with swarms of black flies, so they are still out in force at Jay’s summit, though not at all at the base lodge. Enjoy!
> 
> On another note, this was fledge week at our home in Westmore, Phoebes successfully raised three young, Tree Swallows  another two or three and yesterday the first Bluebird left the nest box, in addition we have juvenile Chipping Sparrow, Sapsucker and Robins
> 
> 
> 
> Bob Stymeist and Martha Steele
> Westmore Vt and 
> Arlington MA
> [log in to unmask]
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sun, 9 Jul 2017 09:30:12 -0400
> From:    Maeve Kim <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Tree Frog who thinks he's a bird
> 
> Neighbor, fellow birder and cousin Leslie has lots of great birds on her property - but she recently noticed a very odd one roosting in a bluebird box. 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264@N05/?
> 
> Has anyone else seen frogs using bird boxes??
> 
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sun, 9 Jul 2017 12:29:58 -0400
> From:    Mark Paul <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Jay Peak Friday BBQ, Tram, and Bicknell’s Thrush
> 
> Thanks Bob--what a great idea!
> 
>> On Sun, Jul 9, 2017 at 7:56 AM, Bob Stymeist <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>> Vermont birders
>> 
>> Jay Peak in the Northeast Kingdom is home to Bicknell’s Thrush and other
>> high elevation birds. Access to the summit of Jay Peak, about 3,800 feet in
>> elevation, can be made with its tram, which operates from 10 AM to 5 PM
>> during the summer, except for Fridays, when it operates until dusk. The
>> Friday later tram rides afford birders the opportunity to look for
>> Bicknell’s Thrush.
>> 
>> We went to the Jay Peak resort, which offers a Friday night BBQ and tram
>> ride, all for the price of $24.95 per person, tram ride included. We
>> arrived early to eat a delicious BBQ buffet (all you can eat) and then took
>> the 6:30 tram to the summit. Once there, we walked down a ski trail only
>> about 100 yards before we started hearing Bicknell’s Thrush. With
>> additional spishing, we called in a total of four Bicknell’s (three of
>> which were seen well) ,also we heard at least four singing Swainson’s
>> Thrush, several Yellow-rumped Warblers, Dark-eyed Juncoes, Ruby crowned
>> Kinglets and White-throated Sparrows though no Blackpoll Warblers, another
>> target of the evening. We walked back to the tram and took the 7:30 tram
>> back down to the base lodge, where we enjoyed s’mores by an outdoor fire
>> pit. It was a wonderful evening and an exceedingly easy way to reach
>> Bicknells Thrush territory.
>> 
>> The Friday specials at the Jay Peak resort run throughout the summer and
>> we thought Vermont birders might be interested in knowing about it in the
>> event that you wan to try for Bicknell’s and Blackpolls. We do caution that
>> last night, we were met with swarms of black flies, so they are still out
>> in force at Jay’s summit, though not at all at the base lodge. Enjoy!
>> 
>> On another note, this was fledge week at our home in Westmore, Phoebes
>> successfully raised three young, Tree Swallows  another two or three and
>> yesterday the first Bluebird left the nest box, in addition we have
>> juvenile Chipping Sparrow, Sapsucker and Robins
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Bob Stymeist and Martha Steele
>> Westmore Vt and
>> Arlington MA
>> [log in to unmask]
>> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sun, 9 Jul 2017 12:49:20 -0400
> From:    Mundi Smithers <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: American Kestrels
> 
> The kestrel chicks are flying and practicing the art of landing.  I’ve counted at least four and a possible fifth.  They are a noisy lot and heaps of fun to watch!
> 
> The Winter Wren continues to wake me each morning so I have no doubt they they are raising a family down by the brook.  And, the Bob-o-links have gone radio silence so I am hoping that they are incubating some eggs and will hatching chicks soon.  I realize that they are late but think that they were displaced from a hay field that was cut early.   We’ll no mow our meadow until mis August to assure them peace and quiet.
> 
> Mundi
> North Pownal
> 
> 
> Mundi Smithers
> 
> 
> The greatest tragedy in mankind's enitire history may be the hijacking of morality by religion.
> Arthur C Clarke (1917-2008)
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sun, 9 Jul 2017 17:48:29 -0400
> From:    Rich Kelley <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Peregrine at UVM
> 
> It's there now, east side of the tower on the catwalk.  It's sitting back a bit and just the head visible.
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Jul 8, 2017, at 18:16, michelep <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>> I'm here at the UVM water tower and it's 6:15. I watched the Paregrine Falcon for about 15 minutes until it flew off to the north. I got pretty good looks at the legs and neither of them was banded.
>> 
>> Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Express 3, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sun, 9 Jul 2017 16:59:23 -0700
> From:    Jean Harrison <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Tree Frog who thinks he's a bird
> 
> Neat!   Jean Harrison
> 
> -----Original Message----- 
> From: Maeve Kim
> Sent: Sunday, July 9, 2017 6:30 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Tree Frog who thinks he's a bird
> 
> Neighbor, fellow birder and cousin Leslie has lots of great birds on her 
> property - but she recently noticed a very odd one roosting in a bluebird 
> box.
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264@N05/?
> 
> Has anyone else seen frogs using bird boxes??
> 
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center
> 
> 
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
> http://www.avg.com 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sun, 9 Jul 2017 21:00:57 -0400
> From:    Ken Copenhaver <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk
> 
> Join us as we monitor a variety of bird species at Missisquoi National
> Wildlife Refuge.
> 
> This month's Bird Monitoring Walk will be on Saturday July 15, 2017 on
> Maquam/Black Creek Trail.  Meet at 8:00 AM at the parking lot on Rte 78,
> about 2.5 miles west of Swanton village.  If you have any questions, email
> me at [log in to unmask]
> 
> The monthly walks will gather long-term data on the presence of birds,
> their abundance, and changes in populations. The information we gather will
> be entered into the Vermont e-Bird database where data is stored by the
> Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society. These walks
> are appropriate for all levels of birders and provide a wonderful
> opportunity to learn about birds throughout the seasons. Led by Ken
> Copenhaver and Julie Filiberti, Friends of Missisquoi National Wildlife
> Refuge board members.
> 
> After 87 months of walks we have observed 145 species.  Hope to see you
> there!
> 
> 
> --Ken Copenhaver
> 
> For information on other refuge events, visit: http://friendsofmissisquoi.
> org/
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 8 Jul 2017 to 9 Jul 2017 (#2017-170)
> ***********************************************************
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Mon, 10 Jul 2017 08:01:53 -0400
> From:    Sue <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Loons Silver Lake - Leicester (101 acres), Jul 9, 2017
> 
> Sent from my iPod
> 
> Begin forwarded message:
> 
>> From: [log in to unmask]
>> Date: July 10, 2017 at 7:45:48 AM EDT
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: eBird Report - Silver Lake - Leicester (101 acres), Jul 9, 2017
>> 
>> Silver Lake - Leicester (101 acres), Addison, Vermont, US
>> Jul 9, 2017 12:30 PM - 4:00 PM
>> Protocol: Traveling
>> 1.5 mile(s)
>> 13 species
>> 
>> Common Loon  2
>> Great Blue Heron  1     Heron was flying at high altitude.
>> Turkey Vulture  7
>> Barred Owl  2
>> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  4
>> Hairy Woodpecker  1
>> Blue-headed Vireo  1
>> Red-eyed Vireo  6
>> Blue Jay  4
>> Black-capped Chickadee  1
>> Hermit Thrush  2
>> Black-throated Green Warbler  1
>> American Goldfinch  1
>> 
>> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S38064425
>> 
>> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Mon, 10 Jul 2017 08:06:14 -0400
> From:    Sue <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Indigo buntingBrandon Pearl St, Jul 9, 2017
> 
> July has brought the unwelcome silence from many species. It always seems too soon but seeing immature birds is a good substitute.
> Sue Wetmore  
> 
> Sent from my iPod
> 
> Begin forwarded message:
> 
>> From: [log in to unmask]
>> Date: July 10, 2017 at 7:59:56 AM EDT
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: eBird Report - Brandon Pearl St, Jul 9, 2017
>> 
>> Brandon Pearl St, Rutland, Vermont, US
>> Jul 9, 2017 6:45 AM - 8:45 AM
>> Protocol: Traveling
>> 1.0 mile(s)
>> 33 species (+1 other taxa)
>> 
>> Mallard  5
>> Mourning Dove  12
>> Downy Woodpecker  1
>> Empidonax sp.  2
>> Eastern Phoebe  4
>> Eastern Kingbird  1
>> Red-eyed Vireo  4
>> Blue Jay  3
>> American Crow  8
>> Common Raven  1
>> Barn Swallow  3
>> Black-capped Chickadee  1
>> Tufted Titmouse  1
>> White-breasted Nuthatch  2
>> House Wren  2
>> Eastern Bluebird  2
>> Veery  1
>> American Robin  11
>> Gray Catbird  4
>> European Starling  10
>> Cedar Waxwing  1
>> Ovenbird  1
>> Common Yellowthroat  4
>> American Redstart  2
>> Chipping Sparrow  3
>> Song Sparrow  7
>> Swamp Sparrow  2
>> Northern Cardinal  6
>> Indigo Bunting  1
>> Red-winged Blackbird  13
>> Brown-headed Cowbird  2
>> House Finch  1
>> American Goldfinch  2
>> House Sparrow  1
>> 
>> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S38064569
>> 
>> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Mon, 10 Jul 2017 09:22:13 -0400
> From:    Scott Morrical <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Falcon at UVM
> 
> The peregrine falcon is on the water tower at UVM this morning, facing north.
> Scott
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:29:11 +0000
> From:    betty jillson <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Tree Frog who thinks he's a bird
> 
> Years ago Doris Dolt told me that Gray Tree Frogs will climb the side of a house.  Well, some time after that I noticed movement under my bed as I was getting ready for work.  It was a Gray Tree Frog who had climbed up to my second story window and let himself in.  I took him down on the lawn at the foot of a tree and some bushes and wished him good luck.  The dew was very heavy and I am sure he did safely.  This occurred near the  foot of White Rocks on Route 140 in Wallingford.
> 
> 
> ________________________________
> From: I notced Vermont Birds <[log in to unmask]> on behalf of Maeve Kim <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Sunday, July 9, 2017 1:30 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Tree Frog who thinks he's a bird
> 
> Neighbor, fellow birder and cousin Leslie has lots of great birds on her property - but she recently noticed a very odd one roosting in a bluebird box.
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264@N05/?
> 
> [https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4281/35005192503_86aacffc27_q.jpg] <https://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264@N05/35005192503/>
> [https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4281/35005192503_86aacffc27_b.jpg]
> [https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4169/34623234442_92bfcca5b6_q.jpg] <https://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264@N05/34623234442/>
> [null]
> [https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4157/34653312371_166b5050fa_q.jpg] <https://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264@N05/34653312371/>
> [https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4157/34653312371_166b5050fa_b.jpg]
> [https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4196/34712519176_3b331ba0ea_q.jpg] <https://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264@N05/34712519176/>
> [null]
> [https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4192/34590623292_1083877e0b_q.jpg] <https://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264@N05/34590623292/>
> [https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4192/34590623292_1083877e0b_b.jpg]
> [https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2898/33187363663_460e15912b_q.jpg] <https://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264@N05/33187363663/>
> [https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2898/33187363663_460e15912b_b.jpg]
> [https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2885/34000302955_3688aa8ff0_q.jpg] <https://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264@N05/34000302955/>
> [https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2885/34000302955_3688aa8ff0_b.jpg]
> [https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8748/28331438115_a0d52ca0aa_q.jpg] <https://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264@N05/28331438115/>
> [null]
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Has anyone else seen frogs using bird boxes??
> 
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Mon, 10 Jul 2017 20:20:03 -0400
> From:    Alison Wagner <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Spotted Sandpipettes
> 
> Dear Birders, Who Will Understand this Simple Joy....
> 
> 
> 
> I have heard people say that birding in July is “slow,” or “quiet,” and not really worthy of a birders’ attention.  But this morning, Clem Nilan, Michele Patenaude and I spent a good chunk of time at Lagoon Road and it did us justice.  True, no “new birds” for the year, unless of course you would consider the hatchlings, and…oh...my...did they capture us!  Grand Prize for cutest shorebird of the day (and perhaps dethroning the Killdeer chick from this status) goes to three, fresh-out-of-the-eggs, Spotted Sandpiper chicks.  Total poof balls with bold black mascara-eyelines and a racing stripe from the top of heads, down the length of their backbones, these cuties resembled a cross between their parents and miniature  burros.  Tiny feather-duster tails bobbed while they foraged independently through the forests of grass and when they disappeared, we’d wait patiently for them to return.   We were not disappointed as they resurfaced again and again, always somewhere new and unexpected:  ascending the mountains of mulch, scritching in the mud for a tiny morsel of food only they could see, weaving along the edge of the flooded field, stopping beside a giant Snipe, freezing in a pose like a Pointer (only they were the predator) and then striking with speed and accuracy I’d expect from an experienced hunter… Always on the move, coming and  going, living by instinct, new born babies… when we finally turned our attention away an hour later, I swear  they looked bigger.
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Mon, 10 Jul 2017 20:24:13 -0400
> From:    Mundi Smithers <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Spotted Sandpipettes
> 
> What a marvelous canvas you have painted. I will hold it in my mind's eye for some time time to come.  Thanks!
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
>> On Jul 10, 2017, at 8:20 PM, Alison Wagner <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>> Dear Birders, Who Will Understand this Simple Joy....
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> I have heard people say that birding in July is “slow,” or “quiet,” and not really worthy of a birders’ attention.  But this morning, Clem Nilan, Michele Patenaude and I spent a good chunk of time at Lagoon Road and it did us justice.  True, no “new birds” for the year, unless of course you would consider the hatchlings, and…oh...my...did they capture us!  Grand Prize for cutest shorebird of the day (and perhaps dethroning the Killdeer chick from this status) goes to three, fresh-out-of-the-eggs, Spotted Sandpiper chicks.  Total poof balls with bold black mascara-eyelines and a racing stripe from the top of heads, down the length of their backbones, these cuties resembled a cross between their parents and miniature  burros.  Tiny feather-duster tails bobbed while they foraged independently through the forests of grass and when they disappeared, we’d wait patiently for them to return.   We were not disappointed as they resurfaced again and again, always somewhere new and unexpected:  ascending the mountains of mulch, scritching in the mud for a tiny morsel of food only they could see, weaving along the edge of the flooded field, stopping beside a giant Snipe, freezing in a pose like a Pointer (only they were the predator) and then striking with speed and accuracy I’d expect from an experienced hunter… Always on the move, coming and  going, living by instinct, new born babies… when we finally turned our attention away an hour later, I swear  they looked bigger.
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Mon, 10 Jul 2017 20:49:31 -0400
> From:    Eve Ticknor <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Spotted Sandpipettes
> 
> I agree with this!  something to hold in our mind’s eye all during the snowy winter months……..  Such a way of writing!
>> On Jul 10, 2017, at 8:24 PM, Mundi Smithers <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>> What a marvelous canvas you have painted. I will hold it in my mind's eye for some time time to come.  Thanks!
>> 
>> Sent from my iPad
>> 
>>> On Jul 10, 2017, at 8:20 PM, Alison Wagner <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>> 
>>> Dear Birders, Who Will Understand this Simple Joy....
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> I have heard people say that birding in July is “slow,” or “quiet,” and not really worthy of a birders’ attention.  But this morning, Clem Nilan, Michele Patenaude and I spent a good chunk of time at Lagoon Road and it did us justice.  True, no “new birds” for the year, unless of course you would consider the hatchlings, and…oh...my...did they capture us!  Grand Prize for cutest shorebird of the day (and perhaps dethroning the Killdeer chick from this status) goes to three, fresh-out-of-the-eggs, Spotted Sandpiper chicks.  Total poof balls with bold black mascara-eyelines and a racing stripe from the top of heads, down the length of their backbones, these cuties resembled a cross between their parents and miniature  burros.  Tiny feather-duster tails bobbed while they foraged independently through the forests of grass and when they disappeared, we’d wait patiently for them to return.   We were not disappointed as they resurfaced again and again, always somewhere new and unexpected:  ascending the mountains of mulch, scritching in the mud for a tiny morsel of food only they could see, weaving along the edge of the flooded field, stopping beside a giant Snipe, freezing in a pose like a Pointer (only they were the predator) and then striking with speed and accuracy I’d expect from an experienced hunter… Always on the move, coming and  going, living by instinct, new born babies… when we finally turned our attention away an hour later, I swear  they looked bigger.
> 
> Eve Ticknor
> Box 2206
> Prescott, On  K0E 1T0
> Canada
> res: 613-925-5528
> cell: 613-859-9545
> 
> The Blue Nest
> 24 Birch Ave, Willsboro, NY 12996
> U S A
> res: 518-963-7404
> cell: 518-524-7377
> 
> http://aquavisions.me
> 
> We delight in the beauty of the butterfly, but rarely admit the changes it has gone through to achieve that beauty. 
>   (Maya Angelou)
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Mon, 10 Jul 2017 18:09:00 -0700
> From:    Eugenia Cooke <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Spotted Sandpipettes
> 
> Delightful account! Thank you.
> 
>> On Jul 10, 2017 8:49 PM, "Eve Ticknor" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>> I agree with this!  something to hold in our mind’s eye all during the
>> snowy winter months……..  Such a way of writing!
>>> On Jul 10, 2017, at 8:24 PM, Mundi Smithers <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>> 
>>> What a marvelous canvas you have painted. I will hold it in my mind's
>> eye for some time time to come.  Thanks!
>>> 
>>> Sent from my iPad
>>> 
>>>> On Jul 10, 2017, at 8:20 PM, Alison Wagner <[log in to unmask]>
>> wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> Dear Birders, Who Will Understand this Simple Joy....
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> I have heard people say that birding in July is “slow,” or “quiet,” and
>> not really worthy of a birders’ attention.  But this morning, Clem Nilan,
>> Michele Patenaude and I spent a good chunk of time at Lagoon Road and it
>> did us justice.  True, no “new birds” for the year, unless of course you
>> would consider the hatchlings, and…oh...my...did they capture us!  Grand
>> Prize for cutest shorebird of the day (and perhaps dethroning the Killdeer
>> chick from this status) goes to three, fresh-out-of-the-eggs, Spotted
>> Sandpiper chicks.  Total poof balls with bold black mascara-eyelines and a
>> racing stripe from the top of heads, down the length of their backbones,
>> these cuties resembled a cross between their parents and miniature
>> burros.  Tiny feather-duster tails bobbed while they foraged independently
>> through the forests of grass and when they disappeared, we’d wait patiently
>> for them to return.   We were not disappointed as they resurfaced again and
>> again, always somewhere new and unexpected:  ascending the mountains of
>> mulch, scritching in the mud for a tiny morsel of food only they could see,
>> weaving along the edge of the flooded field, stopping beside a giant Snipe,
>> freezing in a pose like a Pointer (only they were the predator) and then
>> striking with speed and accuracy I’d expect from an experienced hunter…
>> Always on the move, coming and  going, living by instinct, new born babies…
>> when we finally turned our attention away an hour later, I swear  they
>> looked bigger.
>> 
>> Eve Ticknor
>> Box 2206
>> Prescott, On  K0E 1T0
>> Canada
>> res: 613-925-5528
>> cell: 613-859-9545
>> 
>> The Blue Nest
>> 24 Birch Ave, Willsboro, NY 12996
>> U S A
>> res: 518-963-7404
>> cell: 518-524-7377
>> 
>> http://aquavisions.me
>> 
>> We delight in the beauty of the butterfly, but rarely admit the changes it
>> has gone through to achieve that beauty.
>>   (Maya Angelou)
>> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 9 Jul 2017 to 10 Jul 2017 (#2017-171)
> ************************************************************

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