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VTBIRD  August 2019

VTBIRD August 2019

Subject:

garden fence

From:

david merker <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Vermont Birds <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 27 Aug 2019 12:37:48 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (831 lines)

Great exerience, but Your fence should not be able to catch a hummingbird...If it can tangle a hummingbird it can tangle all sorts of small birds. Maeve, you should look to replace your bird catching fence!... I can provide some great alternative suggestions. We have gone to graduated, small at the bottom larger at the top moveable fence for our garden. Works great. We remove it for winter. It has kept everything out but the birds, who are great partners in the garden. For berrys we now use remey instead of bird trapping berry netting. Agribon Row cover fabric for berries. https://www.premier1supplies.com/garden_wildlife/fencing.php?fence_id=34  for garden. there are many versions to shop for the garden...
VersaNet&#174; Plus 9/20/3 Electric Netting for Garden & Wildlife - Premier1Supplies<https://www.premier1supplies.com/garden_wildlife/fencing.php?fence_id=34>
Effective electric netting that protects gardens, beehives and sweet corn. It keeps out raccoons, woodchucks, small dogs, rabbits, wild pigs, opossums and skunks.
www.premier1supplies.com




David Merker
Etna, New Hampshire
Cape May Raptor Banding Project Inc.

www.capemayraptors.org<http://www.capemayraptors.org>
<https://twitter.com/hashtag/deletefacebook?src=hash>

#deletefacebook<https://twitter.com/hashtag/deletefacebook?src=hash>


________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <[log in to unmask]> on behalf of VTBIRD automatic digest system <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Tuesday, August 27, 2019 12:00 AM
To: [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: VTBIRD Digest - 25 Aug 2019 to 26 Aug 2019 (#2019-212)

There are 18 messages totaling 1088 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. One Pelican or Two? (4)
  2. Moving to North Carolina, Thanks for the Memories
  3. broad-winged hawks
  4. rescue of a hummingbird (7)
  5. Unusual Canada gooose
  6. Westminster Station Nighthawk Count (4)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 26 Aug 2019 05:12:26 -0400
From:    Jim Mead <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: One Pelican or Two?

VT birders,

Bridget brings up a very good question. I looked at several photos of the
pelican seen at Hen Island on July 21 & 22. They show black on the head and
the tip end of the lower mandible. According to info found in The Sibley
Guide to Birds, that particular look fits well for an adult summer bird
(Jun-Aug). Then on Aug. 10th myself & others got a very long distance look
at a pelican at Campbell Bay and noticed that it was showing  no black on
the head, which at that time I mentioned in my eBird report that it
"suggested" that this pelican was not the same pelican as the one seen 20
days earlier at Hen Island. I did a bit more research recently using The
Sibley Guide again and saw that an adult non breeding bird (Sep-Feb) shows
no black on the head or at the tip end of the lower mandible. Thus, the
transition from adult summer plumage to adult non breeding plumage
"appears" to occur during the months of July & August. On Aug. 24th, Henry
Trombley & I saw the pelican at Campbell Bay from a canoe and saw that it
had very little black showing on the head and no black seen on the tip end
of the lower mandible.
Now, because 20 days (pretty much 3 weeks) had passed between the two
sightings (July 21-Aug 10), it seems "possible" to me that the bird seen at
Hen Island "could" have had enough time to loose most of its' black
markings. I am certainly no expert at determining that info so I cannot say
for sure if that is true. However, it does seem (again-"possible") that the
pelican seen at both locations "could" be the same bird.

It would be interesting to read others opinions on this.

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead

On Sun, Aug 25, 2019 at 6:48 PM Bridget Butler <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Greetings All!
>
> At Birds & Beers VT the other night we got talking about the American White
> Pelican sightings. We were in the Islands so many folks who had come out to
> join us had seen the bird and some had taken photos. We had a mix of folks
> who had seen a pelican at the Hen Island site, the Campbell Bay site or
> both.
>
> After a bit, we got to talking about whether there were two birds or one
> bird that had possibly molted. So we started comparing photos from the Hen
> Island bird and the Campbell Bay bird. We used the Islander newspaper photo
> <http://bit.ly/2U21Nq0>s by David Marsch  (Hen) and then Juli Filberti's
> photos <http://bit.ly/33Xz1eH> she got from a kayak (Campbell).
>
> So, here's our question that was left unanswered as we all used our phones
> to try to look up info on molting for this species and decipher the molting
> explanation on Birds of North America Online...IS IT THE SAME BIRD?
>
> David's photos show black on the back of the head while Julie's do not.
>
> Please explain why or why not as we were all trying to grapple with the
> timing of molting for this species and whether or not enough time had
> elapsed between when the bird was seen on Hen Island and then when it was
> found again in Campbell Bay.
>
> Thanks for playing along & helping us extend our Birds and Beers
> conversation!
>
> Bridget
>
> *Bridget Butler*
>
> *Bird Diva Consulting*
> *PO Box 613*
> *St. Albans VT 05478*
> *(802) 393-4147*
> *Website: www.birddiva.com<http://www.birddiva.com> <http://www.birddiva.com>*
> *Facebook: www.facebook.com/birddiva<http://www.facebook.com/birddiva> <http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>*
> *Twitter: @BirdDiva <https://twitter.com/birddiva>*
> *Birder Broker: http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT <http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT
> >*
> *Crows In Vermont: http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT <http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT>*
>
>
> <
> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon
> >
> Virus-free.
> www.avast.com<http://www.avast.com>
> <
> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link
> >
> <#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 26 Aug 2019 10:52:39 +0000
From:    Mike Resch <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Moving to North Carolina, Thanks for the Memories

After 26 years in New England Iím retiring to the mountainsof western North Carolina.  Iíve had agreat time birding throughout the region, and greatly appreciate all the helpprovided by Vermont birders.  Althoughsome of the best VT birding was a long drive from home, limiting my VT list to282, I still enjoyed lots of fond birding memories like Ė
ďPelagic tripsĒ on Lake Champlain with Little Gull(10/19/13) and Sabineís Gull (9/9/17)
Fall passerine trips to the southeast part of the statefinding a Connecticut Warbler (9/27/16) and Blue Grosbeak (10/12/18)
Seeing a Yellow-crowned Night Heron by flashlight atBomoseen SP on 8/31/15 (on my 3rd try)
Slowly ticking off those shorebird species at places likethe Colchester Causeway, Goose Bay, Dead Creek, etc.
Poring through goose flocks in Vernon to find Cackling andBarnacle Geese (3/28/07) -though I couldnít pick out the Barnacle after it andthe rest of the flock flew out over NH airspace
Those large Snow Goose flocks, with an occasional Rossís, inAddison
Finding Grebe and Scoter flocks on inland lakes duringmigration.  Not to mention rarerďcoastalĒ waterfowl like Harlequin Duck (3/23/06) and King Eider (11/30/17) Now Iím looking forward to learning more about the birds of themountains of NC and beyond.  Afterall,just like New England, there are a lot of states nearby -SC and TN are justshort drives away.  One species Iím especiallylooking forward to learning about is the Swainsonís Warbler that breeds in themountainous rhododendron thickets Ė Iíve never seen them in that habitat.
Also now that Iím retired from my 9-to-5 job, Iím starting abird guiding company - 50 States Birding.  Iím putting my knowledge of birdingin all 50 states to use in providing two guiding options:

1.  Traditional guiding services where Iaccompany birders in the field to help find target species or in general birdan area that is new to them.

2.  A unique research-based service whereI provide birders with customized information to help them bird an area ontheir own.  In this lower-cost option Iuse on-line research supplemented with my own personal knowledge of the area toidentify birding sites that best meet the clientís objectives.  Then for each site I provide a downloadablePDF including maps, lists of expected species, tips to find key species, andgeneral suggestions on how to bird each site. (sorry for the commercial)
If your travels take you to the mountains of western NC, orplaces nearby, send me an e-mail Ė perhaps we could bird together (SwainsonísWarbler anyone?)  Plus I can catch up onall those rarities Iíve missed back in New England.

Mike Reschwww.statebirding.blogspot.comHendersonville, NC

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 26 Aug 2019 07:47:33 -0400
From:    Liz Lackey <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: One Pelican or Two?

Hi all,
Iím so glad there is a discussion on this.  I noticed black on the head in some photos of the Pelican, and none in others and was wondering about molt transitions.  I hadnít taken the time to follow up on this so am glad others did.  I have not been up to actually see the bird myself.

Meanwhile, Iím attempting to enter more molt details on ebird.  This time of year there is quite a range of plumage characteristics.  Obviously I canít get the same detail as if I had them in the hand during a banding procedure (thanks Chris Rimmer and crew for sharing so much of your knowledge with me during the Mt Mansfield bird banding project), but at times plumage/age state it is very evident when looking at warblers, thrushes, sparrows, etc etc thru binocs.  This info on ebird will add to our knowledge of dispersal of young birds, adult non-breeding etc.

My local breeding pair of Broad-winged Hawks are looking pretty dapper now.  Most of their flight feathers have been replaced so I expect them to think about heading out to South America soon.  It has been fun to watch them go from scruffy, overworked parents, with many gaps in their wings, to plump bodied, crisply-edged winged soaring machines once again.

Enjoy molts and migration.

Liz Lackey
Stowe, VT


> On Aug 26, 2019, at 5:12 AM, Jim Mead <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> VT birders,
>
> Bridget brings up a very good question. I looked at several photos of the
> pelican seen at Hen Island on July 21 & 22. They show black on the head and
> the tip end of the lower mandible. According to info found in The Sibley
> Guide to Birds, that particular look fits well for an adult summer bird
> (Jun-Aug). Then on Aug. 10th myself & others got a very long distance look
> at a pelican at Campbell Bay and noticed that it was showing  no black on
> the head, which at that time I mentioned in my eBird report that it
> "suggested" that this pelican was not the same pelican as the one seen 20
> days earlier at Hen Island. I did a bit more research recently using The
> Sibley Guide again and saw that an adult non breeding bird (Sep-Feb) shows
> no black on the head or at the tip end of the lower mandible. Thus, the
> transition from adult summer plumage to adult non breeding plumage
> "appears" to occur during the months of July & August. On Aug. 24th, Henry
> Trombley & I saw the pelican at Campbell Bay from a canoe and saw that it
> had very little black showing on the head and no black seen on the tip end
> of the lower mandible.
> Now, because 20 days (pretty much 3 weeks) had passed between the two
> sightings (July 21-Aug 10), it seems "possible" to me that the bird seen at
> Hen Island "could" have had enough time to loose most of its' black
> markings. I am certainly no expert at determining that info so I cannot say
> for sure if that is true. However, it does seem (again-"possible") that the
> pelican seen at both locations "could" be the same bird.
>
> It would be interesting to read others opinions on this.
>
> Enjoy Birds,
>
> Jim Mead
>
> On Sun, Aug 25, 2019 at 6:48 PM Bridget Butler <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> Greetings All!
>>
>> At Birds & Beers VT the other night we got talking about the American White
>> Pelican sightings. We were in the Islands so many folks who had come out to
>> join us had seen the bird and some had taken photos. We had a mix of folks
>> who had seen a pelican at the Hen Island site, the Campbell Bay site or
>> both.
>>
>> After a bit, we got to talking about whether there were two birds or one
>> bird that had possibly molted. So we started comparing photos from the Hen
>> Island bird and the Campbell Bay bird. We used the Islander newspaper photo
>> <http://bit.ly/2U21Nq0>s by David Marsch  (Hen) and then Juli Filberti's
>> photos <http://bit.ly/33Xz1eH> she got from a kayak (Campbell).
>>
>> So, here's our question that was left unanswered as we all used our phones
>> to try to look up info on molting for this species and decipher the molting
>> explanation on Birds of North America Online...IS IT THE SAME BIRD?
>>
>> David's photos show black on the back of the head while Julie's do not.
>>
>> Please explain why or why not as we were all trying to grapple with the
>> timing of molting for this species and whether or not enough time had
>> elapsed between when the bird was seen on Hen Island and then when it was
>> found again in Campbell Bay.
>>
>> Thanks for playing along & helping us extend our Birds and Beers
>> conversation!
>>
>> Bridget
>>
>> *Bridget Butler*
>>
>> *Bird Diva Consulting*
>> *PO Box 613*
>> *St. Albans VT 05478*
>> *(802) 393-4147*
>> *Website: www.birddiva.com<http://www.birddiva.com> <http://www.birddiva.com>*
>> *Facebook: www.facebook.com/birddiva<http://www.facebook.com/birddiva> <http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>*
>> *Twitter: @BirdDiva <https://twitter.com/birddiva>*
>> *Birder Broker: http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT <http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT
>>> *
>> *Crows In Vermont: http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT <http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT>*
>>
>>
>> <
>> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon
>>>
>> Virus-free.
>> www.avast.com<http://www.avast.com>
>> <
>> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link
>>>
>> <#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>>

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 26 Aug 2019 08:36:35 -0400
From:    Maeve Kim <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: One Pelican or Two?

Interesting research and speculation, Jim. It does seem more likely that one bird has undergone some plumage changes than that two rare vagrants have shown up at the same time in the same area - but anything is possible! Thatís what makes birding so much fun.
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center

> On Aug 26, 2019, at 5:12 AM, Jim Mead <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> VT birders,
>
> Bridget brings up a very good question. I looked at several photos of the
> pelican seen at Hen Island on July 21 & 22. They show black on the head and
> the tip end of the lower mandible. According to info found in The Sibley
> Guide to Birds, that particular look fits well for an adult summer bird
> (Jun-Aug). Then on Aug. 10th myself & others got a very long distance look
> at a pelican at Campbell Bay and noticed that it was showing  no black on
> the head, which at that time I mentioned in my eBird report that it
> "suggested" that this pelican was not the same pelican as the one seen 20
> days earlier at Hen Island. I did a bit more research recently using The
> Sibley Guide again and saw that an adult non breeding bird (Sep-Feb) shows
> no black on the head or at the tip end of the lower mandible. Thus, the
> transition from adult summer plumage to adult non breeding plumage
> "appears" to occur during the months of July & August. On Aug. 24th, Henry
> Trombley & I saw the pelican at Campbell Bay from a canoe and saw that it
> had very little black showing on the head and no black seen on the tip end
> of the lower mandible.
> Now, because 20 days (pretty much 3 weeks) had passed between the two
> sightings (July 21-Aug 10), it seems "possible" to me that the bird seen at
> Hen Island "could" have had enough time to loose most of its' black
> markings. I am certainly no expert at determining that info so I cannot say
> for sure if that is true. However, it does seem (again-"possible") that the
> pelican seen at both locations "could" be the same bird.
>
> It would be interesting to read others opinions on this.
>
> Enjoy Birds,
>
> Jim Mead
>
> On Sun, Aug 25, 2019 at 6:48 PM Bridget Butler <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> Greetings All!
>>
>> At Birds & Beers VT the other night we got talking about the American White
>> Pelican sightings. We were in the Islands so many folks who had come out to
>> join us had seen the bird and some had taken photos. We had a mix of folks
>> who had seen a pelican at the Hen Island site, the Campbell Bay site or
>> both.
>>
>> After a bit, we got to talking about whether there were two birds or one
>> bird that had possibly molted. So we started comparing photos from the Hen
>> Island bird and the Campbell Bay bird. We used the Islander newspaper photo
>> <http://bit.ly/2U21Nq0>s by David Marsch  (Hen) and then Juli Filberti's
>> photos <http://bit.ly/33Xz1eH> she got from a kayak (Campbell).
>>
>> So, here's our question that was left unanswered as we all used our phones
>> to try to look up info on molting for this species and decipher the molting
>> explanation on Birds of North America Online...IS IT THE SAME BIRD?
>>
>> David's photos show black on the back of the head while Julie's do not.
>>
>> Please explain why or why not as we were all trying to grapple with the
>> timing of molting for this species and whether or not enough time had
>> elapsed between when the bird was seen on Hen Island and then when it was
>> found again in Campbell Bay.
>>
>> Thanks for playing along & helping us extend our Birds and Beers
>> conversation!
>>
>> Bridget
>>
>> *Bridget Butler*
>>
>> *Bird Diva Consulting*
>> *PO Box 613*
>> *St. Albans VT 05478*
>> *(802) 393-4147*
>> *Website: www.birddiva.com<http://www.birddiva.com> <http://www.birddiva.com>*
>> *Facebook: www.facebook.com/birddiva<http://www.facebook.com/birddiva> <http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>*
>> *Twitter: @BirdDiva <https://twitter.com/birddiva>*
>> *Birder Broker: http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT <http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT
>>> *
>> *Crows In Vermont: http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT <http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT>*
>>
>>
>> <
>> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon
>>>
>> Virus-free.
>> www.avast.com<http://www.avast.com>
>> <
>> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link
>>>
>> <#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>>

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 26 Aug 2019 11:37:39 -0400
From:    Ted Levin <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: broad-winged hawks

A flight of six over North Pomfret

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 26 Aug 2019 12:48:53 -0400
From:    Maeve Kim <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: rescue of a hummingbird

I had an extraordinary and touching experience this morning. I went out to the garden for the morning harvest, and as I stood picking cakes I heard an odd whirring noise close by. There was an immature Ruby-throated Hummingbird caught in the mesh fencing of the garden, his bill and head inside the garden and the rest of his tiny self outside. It took only a second or two to free him, but all the while he made a high almost singing noise that I didnít know hummers could make.
I am SO happy that I went into the garden then, rather than a few hours from now, and still touched and delighted that I - for a second - held a hummingbird and was able to set it free.
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 26 Aug 2019 13:32:36 -0400
From:    Miriam Lawrence <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: rescue of a hummingbird

How wonderful. Maeve! Thank you for helping... and for sharing this with
us!!

On Mon, Aug 26, 2019 at 12:49 PM Maeve Kim <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> I had an extraordinary and touching experience this morning. I went out to
> the garden for the morning harvest, and as I stood picking cakes I heard an
> odd whirring noise close by. There was an immature Ruby-throated
> Hummingbird caught in the mesh fencing of the garden, his bill and head
> inside the garden and the rest of his tiny self outside. It took only a
> second or two to free him, but all the while he made a high almost singing
> noise that I didnít know hummers could make.
> I am SO happy that I went into the garden then, rather than a few hours
> from now, and still touched and delighted that I - for a second - held a
> hummingbird and was able to set it free.
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center



--
Miriam Lawrence
[log in to unmask]
(c) 802-238-1830

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 26 Aug 2019 15:34:32 -0400
From:    Richard Guthrie <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: rescue of a hummingbird

That does generate a warm feeling inside. Thank-you

Rich Guthrie


On Mon, Aug 26, 2019 at 1:34 PM Miriam Lawrence <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> How wonderful. Maeve! Thank you for helping... and for sharing this with
> us!!
>
> On Mon, Aug 26, 2019 at 12:49 PM Maeve Kim <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
> > I had an extraordinary and touching experience this morning. I went out
> to
> > the garden for the morning harvest, and as I stood picking cakes I heard
> an
> > odd whirring noise close by. There was an immature Ruby-throated
> > Hummingbird caught in the mesh fencing of the garden, his bill and head
> > inside the garden and the rest of his tiny self outside. It took only a
> > second or two to free him, but all the while he made a high almost
> singing
> > noise that I didnít know hummers could make.
> > I am SO happy that I went into the garden then, rather than a few hours
> > from now, and still touched and delighted that I - for a second - held a
> > hummingbird and was able to set it free.
> > Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>
>
>
> --
> Miriam Lawrence
> [log in to unmask]
> (c) 802-238-1830
>


--
Richard Guthrie

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 26 Aug 2019 16:35:30 -0400
From:    Sarah Fellows <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Unusual Canada gooose

A squadron of 12 geese floated by me this morning at Birdland, north hero. Leading was a goose with the usual chinstrap, but it melded into a white cap on its head!!!!.
I ran along the shore to take photos,but they were just a little to far out to pick up the head color.Maybe it dunked into some paint??????

Sally Fellows
North hero

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 26 Aug 2019 21:36:23 +0000
From:    anneboby <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: rescue of a hummingbird

Maeve - as a hummer bander who has banded over 5700 of them, and in the process allowed dozens of attending observers the opportunity to hold one of these avian jewels in their hand for release, the response from all these people has been one of absolute awe and amazement...a life-changing moment for them awakening them to a whole new world.
I am pleased that you are now among them.
Bob YunickSchenectady, NY

-----Original Message-----
From: Maeve Kim <[log in to unmask]>
To: VTBIRD <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Mon, Aug 26, 2019 12:49 pm
Subject: [VTBIRD] rescue of a hummingbird

I had an extraordinary and touching experience this morning. I went out to the garden for the morning harvest, and as I stood picking cakes I heard an odd whirring noise close by. There was an immature Ruby-throated Hummingbird caught in the mesh fencing of the garden, his bill and head inside the garden and the rest of his tiny self outside. It took only a second or two to free him, but all the while he made a high almost singing noise that I didnít know hummers could make.
I am SO happy that I went into the garden then, rather than a few hours from now, and still touched and delighted that I - for a second - held a hummingbird and was able to set it free.
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 26 Aug 2019 17:48:02 -0400
From:    Jill Vickers <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: rescue of a hummingbird

Kayaking at 3 on The Otter in Vergennes, I spotted a green heron on shoreline. Did not see if it was fishing with bait, but did see it catch a fish, swallow it and hop a few steps before deficating. I eventually spooked it and got to see it in flight. Highlight of paddle.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 26, 2019, at 3:34 PM, Richard Guthrie <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> That does generate a warm feeling inside. Thank-you
>
> Rich Guthrie
>
>
> On Mon, Aug 26, 2019 at 1:34 PM Miriam Lawrence <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
>> How wonderful. Maeve! Thank you for helping... and for sharing this with
>> us!!
>>
>> On Mon, Aug 26, 2019 at 12:49 PM Maeve Kim <[log in to unmask]>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> I had an extraordinary and touching experience this morning. I went out
>> to
>>> the garden for the morning harvest, and as I stood picking cakes I heard
>> an
>>> odd whirring noise close by. There was an immature Ruby-throated
>>> Hummingbird caught in the mesh fencing of the garden, his bill and head
>>> inside the garden and the rest of his tiny self outside. It took only a
>>> second or two to free him, but all the while he made a high almost
>> singing
>>> noise that I didnít know hummers could make.
>>> I am SO happy that I went into the garden then, rather than a few hours
>>> from now, and still touched and delighted that I - for a second - held a
>>> hummingbird and was able to set it free.
>>> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Miriam Lawrence
>> [log in to unmask]
>> (c) 802-238-1830
>>
>
>
> --
> Richard Guthrie
>

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 26 Aug 2019 19:41:22 -0400
From:    Sue <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: rescue of a hummingbird

I too have had the thrill of a hummer rescue. A friend called to say she had a hummer on her porch and it wasn't finding its way out. So I went down and observed this tiny bird up high at a small window. A ladder was secured and I climbed up to the bird and slowly brought my hand towards the trapped bird. As I enclosed my hand about the hummer she relaxed and I took her outside and released her. Off she went free as a bird!
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

> On Aug 26, 2019, at 12:48 PM, Maeve Kim <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> I had an extraordinary and touching experience this morning. I went out to the garden for the morning harvest, and as I stood picking cakes I heard an odd whirring noise close by. There was an immature Ruby-throated Hummingbird caught in the mesh fencing of the garden, his bill and head inside the garden and the rest of his tiny self outside. It took only a second or two to free him, but all the while he made a high almost singing noise that I didnít know hummers could make.
> I am SO happy that I went into the garden then, rather than a few hours from now, and still touched and delighted that I - for a second - held a hummingbird and was able to set it free.
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 26 Aug 2019 20:10:31 -0400
From:    Donald Clark <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count

Finally a great night. We tallied 564 birds in 3 hours with one string of 188 birds. Hopefully this is only the start.

Don Clark
Grafton

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 26 Aug 2019 20:58:47 -0400
From:    Liz Lackey <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count

Gail Yanowitch and I watched in Stowe Village from 6-7:45p.  We had 105 for a total.  The birds stayed foraging overhead for quite awhile offering great looks.  They  drifted northward, then southward, then northward and finally disappeared to the south.  Our largest group was 51.

Iím going to watch from my front porch tomorrow.  I think Iíll be able to see most of the flight from this vantage point.  It will be so amazing if it works.  Will keep you all posted!

Liz Lackey
Stowe

> On Aug 26, 2019, at 8:10 PM, Donald Clark <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> Finally a great night. We tallied 564 birds in 3 hours with one string of 188 birds. Hopefully this is only the start.
>
> Don Clark
> Grafton

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 26 Aug 2019 21:46:43 -0400
From:    Pat Folsom <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count

Wonderful reports.  I tried a spot in Waitsfield (UCC) this evening that was productive last night.  NO luck tonight, only 4 last night.

Pat in Waitsfield

----- Original Message -----
From: "Liz Lackey" <[log in to unmask]>
To: "VT Bird" <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Monday, August 26, 2019 5:58:47 PM
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count

Gail Yanowitch and I watched in Stowe Village from 6-7:45p.  We had 105 for a total.  The birds stayed foraging overhead for quite awhile offering great looks.  They  drifted northward, then southward, then northward and finally disappeared to the south.  Our largest group was 51.

Iím going to watch from my front porch tomorrow.  I think Iíll be able to see most of the flight from this vantage point.  It will be so amazing if it works.  Will keep you all posted!

Liz Lackey
Stowe

> On Aug 26, 2019, at 8:10 PM, Donald Clark <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> Finally a great night. We tallied 564 birds in 3 hours with one string of 188 birds. Hopefully this is only the start.
>
> Don Clark
> Grafton

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 26 Aug 2019 21:57:20 -0400
From:    Charlie La Rosa <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count

And just for a relative comparison, a lone nighthawk headed in the general
direction of Westminster observed a late summer gathering of about two
hundred people enjoying a terrific locally-sourced dinner and some great
locally-sourced music in the meadow at Crossmolina Farm in West Corinth
Saturday evening.

Charlie La Rosa
So. Washington





On Mon, Aug 26, 2019 at 9:46 PM Pat Folsom <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Wonderful reports.  I tried a spot in Waitsfield (UCC) this evening that
> was productive last night.  NO luck tonight, only 4 last night.
>
> Pat in Waitsfield
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Liz Lackey" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: "VT Bird" <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Monday, August 26, 2019 5:58:47 PM
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
>
> Gail Yanowitch and I watched in Stowe Village from 6-7:45p.  We had 105
> for a total.  The birds stayed foraging overhead for quite awhile offering
> great looks.  They  drifted northward, then southward, then northward and
> finally disappeared to the south.  Our largest group was 51.
>
> Iím going to watch from my front porch tomorrow.  I think Iíll be able to
> see most of the flight from this vantage point.  It will be so amazing if
> it works.  Will keep you all posted!
>
> Liz Lackey
> Stowe
>
> > On Aug 26, 2019, at 8:10 PM, Donald Clark <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >
> > Finally a great night. We tallied 564 birds in 3 hours with one string
> of 188 birds. Hopefully this is only the start.
> >
> > Don Clark
> > Grafton
>

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 26 Aug 2019 22:16:02 -0400
From:    Julie Filiberti <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: One Pelican or Two?

My two centsÖ.

I took advantage of a calm day and spent the afternoon kayaking back out to the pelican today. I got very close and got myself some pretty close up views of the head. It was not at all concerned with my presence there, btw. Here is my checklist. https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S59297323

After a good look today, I believe it is the same bird. This bird has a tinge of black remaining on the back of his head that you can see in one of my photos. I think it has molted most of the black in the time it has spent here, and has a little more left to go.

It was a great day on the water!
Julie


> On Aug 26, 2019, at 8:36 AM, Maeve Kim <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> Interesting research and speculation, Jim. It does seem more likely that one bird has undergone some plumage changes than that two rare vagrants have shown up at the same time in the same area - but anything is possible! Thatís what makes birding so much fun.
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>
>> On Aug 26, 2019, at 5:12 AM, Jim Mead <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>> VT birders,
>>
>> Bridget brings up a very good question. I looked at several photos of the
>> pelican seen at Hen Island on July 21 & 22. They show black on the head and
>> the tip end of the lower mandible. According to info found in The Sibley
>> Guide to Birds, that particular look fits well for an adult summer bird
>> (Jun-Aug). Then on Aug. 10th myself & others got a very long distance look
>> at a pelican at Campbell Bay and noticed that it was showing  no black on
>> the head, which at that time I mentioned in my eBird report that it
>> "suggested" that this pelican was not the same pelican as the one seen 20
>> days earlier at Hen Island. I did a bit more research recently using The
>> Sibley Guide again and saw that an adult non breeding bird (Sep-Feb) shows
>> no black on the head or at the tip end of the lower mandible. Thus, the
>> transition from adult summer plumage to adult non breeding plumage
>> "appears" to occur during the months of July & August. On Aug. 24th, Henry
>> Trombley & I saw the pelican at Campbell Bay from a canoe and saw that it
>> had very little black showing on the head and no black seen on the tip end
>> of the lower mandible.
>> Now, because 20 days (pretty much 3 weeks) had passed between the two
>> sightings (July 21-Aug 10), it seems "possible" to me that the bird seen at
>> Hen Island "could" have had enough time to loose most of its' black
>> markings. I am certainly no expert at determining that info so I cannot say
>> for sure if that is true. However, it does seem (again-"possible") that the
>> pelican seen at both locations "could" be the same bird.
>>
>> It would be interesting to read others opinions on this.
>>
>> Enjoy Birds,
>>
>> Jim Mead
>>
>> On Sun, Aug 25, 2019 at 6:48 PM Bridget Butler <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>>> Greetings All!
>>>
>>> At Birds & Beers VT the other night we got talking about the American White
>>> Pelican sightings. We were in the Islands so many folks who had come out to
>>> join us had seen the bird and some had taken photos. We had a mix of folks
>>> who had seen a pelican at the Hen Island site, the Campbell Bay site or
>>> both.
>>>
>>> After a bit, we got to talking about whether there were two birds or one
>>> bird that had possibly molted. So we started comparing photos from the Hen
>>> Island bird and the Campbell Bay bird. We used the Islander newspaper photo
>>> <http://bit.ly/2U21Nq0>s by David Marsch  (Hen) and then Juli Filberti's
>>> photos <http://bit.ly/33Xz1eH> she got from a kayak (Campbell).
>>>
>>> So, here's our question that was left unanswered as we all used our phones
>>> to try to look up info on molting for this species and decipher the molting
>>> explanation on Birds of North America Online...IS IT THE SAME BIRD?
>>>
>>> David's photos show black on the back of the head while Julie's do not.
>>>
>>> Please explain why or why not as we were all trying to grapple with the
>>> timing of molting for this species and whether or not enough time had
>>> elapsed between when the bird was seen on Hen Island and then when it was
>>> found again in Campbell Bay.
>>>
>>> Thanks for playing along & helping us extend our Birds and Beers
>>> conversation!
>>>
>>> Bridget
>>>
>>> *Bridget Butler*
>>>
>>> *Bird Diva Consulting*
>>> *PO Box 613*
>>> *St. Albans VT 05478*
>>> *(802) 393-4147*
>>> *Website: www.birddiva.com<http://www.birddiva.com> <http://www.birddiva.com>*
>>> *Facebook: www.facebook.com/birddiva<http://www.facebook.com/birddiva> <http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>*
>>> *Twitter: @BirdDiva <https://twitter.com/birddiva>*
>>> *Birder Broker: http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT <http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT
>>>> *
>>> *Crows In Vermont: http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT <http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT>*
>>>
>>>
>>> <
>>> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon
>>>>
>>> Virus-free.
>>> www.avast.com<http://www.avast.com>
>>> <
>>> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link
>>>>
>>> <#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>>>

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 26 Aug 2019 22:25:18 -0400
From:    Ken Copenhaver <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: rescue of a hummingbird

Many years ago a hummingbird flew into my garage through the overhead
door.  I found it trying to get out through the closed window of the
opposite wall, repeatedly bumping itself into the glass.  If I hadn't been
there to free it, I suppose it would have (eventually) either turned itself
around and flown out through the overhead door, or exhausted itself against
the window.  In any case, catching and releasing the bird was a memorable
experience.

--Ken Copenhaver

On Mon, Aug 26, 2019 at 7:41 PM Sue <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> I too have had the thrill of a hummer rescue. A friend called to say she
> had a hummer on her porch and it wasn't finding its way out. So I went down
> and observed this tiny bird up high at a small window. A ladder was secured
> and I climbed up to the bird and slowly brought my hand towards the trapped
> bird. As I enclosed my hand about the hummer she relaxed and I took her
> outside and released her. Off she went free as a bird!
> Sue Wetmore
>
> Sent from my iPod
>
> > On Aug 26, 2019, at 12:48 PM, Maeve Kim <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >
> > I had an extraordinary and touching experience this morning. I went out
> to the garden for the morning harvest, and as I stood picking cakes I heard
> an odd whirring noise close by. There was an immature Ruby-throated
> Hummingbird caught in the mesh fencing of the garden, his bill and head
> inside the garden and the rest of his tiny self outside. It took only a
> second or two to free him, but all the while he made a high almost singing
> noise that I didnít know hummers could make.
> > I am SO happy that I went into the garden then, rather than a few hours
> from now, and still touched and delighted that I - for a second - held a
> hummingbird and was able to set it free.
> > Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>

------------------------------

End of VTBIRD Digest - 25 Aug 2019 to 26 Aug 2019 (#2019-212)
*************************************************************

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