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COMMUNET  August 1993, Week 2

COMMUNET August 1993, Week 2

Subject:

Re: Techno-dumping (and the TeleRead alternative)

From:

Jason Jed <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Jason Jed <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 13 Aug 1993 08:21:45 -0700

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (516 lines)

I've been following this thread somewhat, and thought I should to jump in
and let you know that a "TeleReader-like" device already exists!  It's
called the Newton and has just been released by Apple.  I'm attaching a
review which found it's way into my e-mail box about a week ago.  Sorry to
rain on your parade, but I guess John Sculley et al. beat you to it... :)
 
                                 `""""
                                 @ 0 0
------------------------------oOO---^---OOo------------------------------
Jason Jed                                      [log in to unmask]
Integrative Biology Department                 [log in to unmask]
University of California                              Phone: 510-643-9048
Berkeley, CA 94720                                      FAX: 510-643-6264
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
---------- Text of forwarded message ----------
Date: Fri, 6 Aug 1993 14:01:56 -0400
Subject: Newton Messagepad: Something to Hold Onto
Date: 5 Aug 1993 17:28:17 -0400
 
 
Something from the CompuServe Newton Forum
Mark Scheuern
[log in to unmask]
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A FIRST LOOK:
THE NEWTON MESSAGEPAD: SOMETHING TO HOLD ONTO?
by Neil L. Shapiro
 
(Copyright (c) 1993 by Neil L. Shapiro and MCU Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Permission is given to non-commercial Apple user group newsletters and BBS
and only such to reprint this article provided it is reprinted in whole,
unedited and with this paragraph included. For updates to this article
please visit the Newton/PIE Forum on CompuServe by entering GO NEWTON or
GO APPLEPIE at any of CompuServe's exclamation mark prompts).
 
 
        Revolutions may be fought on a battlefield. Or a revolution can
occur in the cloisters of the mind. Now we have a revolution that can be
held in the palm of your hand: The Newton MessagePad from Apple Computer
Inc. I was recently allowed to preview a MessagePad. The unit that I used
for a few days contained software and interface that was not the final
(although near to final) design and this should be borne in mind as it may
change some of the items mentioned herein. As new MessagePads are released
I will update this article accordingly. But, as a first look, here's what
I saw.
 
POCKET PARADIGMS
        The Newton MessagePad is Apple's first machine featuring Newton
technology and Newton Intelligence and is from their PIE or Personal
Interactive Electronics Division. There will be other Newtons in the near
future as well as other lines of machines rumored to be also released soon
from the PIE people. So, while the MessagePad is "a Newton" it is not "The
Newton" anymore then either a Quadra or a Centris is "The Macintosh."
Rather, the MessagePad is just one model of Newton and that is an
important distinction to make.
        A Newton MessagePad is billed by Apple as a "communications
assistant" and is a handheld, pen-based device featuring such things as
handwriting recognition, connectivity, automatic helps and much more all
in a slim package that measures about 4" by 7" by 1". Of that measurement,
the LCD screen area upon which the user must write, as well as read from,
measures 3" by 4.5".
        Just below the screen are seven permanent icons. These icons are
used to access the MessagePad's various built-in programs and features.
The Names icon, when tapped, will take one to the Name File; the Dates
icon to the Datebook, Calendar and To-Do List areas; the Extras icon to
areas involving connectivity as well as an assortment of things from
guided tours to setting preferences; the Undo icon will undo the last two
entries; the Find icon is used to find ASCII strings in recognized type;
the Assist icon takes one to the Intelligent Assistant which helps to
automate many processes; and in the center is an icon composed of a large
dot with an up-arrow above and a down-arrow below to move through
displayed material.
        The MessagePad will also accept one PCMIA plug-in card (type 2.0)
for extra RAM memory or a modem (although too thin a slot to accept a
PCMIA hard disk drive). The plugged-in RAM card may be used as more memory
for the MessagePad and may also be used to backup the MessagePad and
restore it in case of need and third-party or expansion software may also
be delivered on and run off such a card.
 
RECOGNITION ROUTINES
        Writing on the screen and testing out the handwriting and
pen-based interface of this Newton will be the first thing that the new
user will try.  Such writing is carried out using a supplied "pen" that
tucks neatly into a built-in carrier on the side of the case. This special
pen features a plastic point that will not scratch the glass.
        The Notepad area is always available onscreen and it's there most
will begin their experiments.  In this section it's assumed that the user
is in this Notepad area. The MessagePad's handwriting recognition is
turned on by touching the pen to the mini-icon that toggles that feature
(highlighting when it is on).
        Some will first scrawl a message such as "This is a test" on the
screen while others will immediately try to sign their names. Of those
first-timers who sign their names, users with names such as Bill Smith or
Don Jones will fare better then those with more unusual names. The
MessagePad uses its Newton Intelligence to decode handwriting into type
and much of that intelligence is dependent on internal word lists. But if
you have a name like Shapiro (which my MessagePad continued to recognize
as "Fillipino" at first) the problem is quickly remedied.  Newton
Intelligence is smart enough to learn -- and quickly -- from the user.
        When it happens that the MessagePad commits such a faux pas, the
user takes the pen and taps twice on the word. An onscreen list of words
appears with the unit's best guesses displayed in a menu fashion. If the
word meant appears as a secondary choice, the user just taps on the proper
word and the type changes to that corrected word. If, however, the
MessagePad doesn't appear to have a clue there is a picture of a keyboard
and the user taps that to allow the onscreen keyboard to appear. The pen
is then used to press the letters (and shift, space and other keys) on
this virtual keyboard to enter the proper translation. The odds are good
that the next time such a word is entered that the Newton Intelligence
routines will know how to decode it. Some words may take a few trainings.
        Note that the more you use a MessagePad the more reliably your
machine will recognize your handwriting. Toward that end the settable
preferences choice in the Extras icon allows for handwriting practice. In
that mode the user is presented with words to write from the MessagePad's
list. But the best way to train a Newton MessagePad is to simply allow it
to get to know you. As you use it from day to day, if your routines are
like most people's, you will have a certain vocabulary that repeats and it
won't be long before you customize your own MessagePad to read your own
handwriting.
        The flip side to this is that it can be a bit difficult to share a
Newton between two or more users. When such sharing is done, there is a
choice to turn off this learning process so that if you must share your
Newton with a person who insists on writing far differently (or even a
little differently) from you it will not ruin all your training efforts.
This is worth calling out for the new MessagePad owner -- if you share
your Newton, make sure that you have checked the choice "Configure for
guest user" in the Handwriting Styles area of the Preferences menu in the
Extras drawer.
        While in the Preferences area the user can help the Newton along a
bit by looking at various styles of handwriting for each letter in the
alphabet and some punctuation. Each character is shown in a little
mini-movie as to how the pen would move in different handwritings to
achieve that letter (this is in the Letter Styles area). If you do not
ever use a particular stroke sequence or letter formation you can
immediately tell the Newton. However, the automatic learning function will
update this area as you use the machine -- and the automatic learning may
actually be more reliable then entering this manually.
        When handwritten text is recognized it will be displayed in a
user-settable typestyle. There are two typefaces available -- a "fancy"
one that is a light serif and weighted and a "simple" one which is
sans-serif, not weighted and monospaced. Typesizes are 9, 10, 12 and 18
points and styles are plain, bold and underline. Word and letters may be
individually selected (see below) and styled.
        Besides text recognition there is also shape recognition. Turning
on the shape-recognition icon means that the Newton can make shapes that
are not exactly drawn symmetrical, smooth them and close them. (Or just
one or two such functions depending on settable preferences). So it
becomes easy for a non-artist to draw perfect circles and curves.
        A caveat here is to try to keep only one icon or the other turned
on.  I found that if both text and shape recognition were on (and I assume
this will likely be true in the release version also) the MessagePad as
you would suspect had a difficult time distinguishing between small
circles and the letter O and the number 0 if entered alone and not
embedded in text.
        If text recognition and shape recognition are both turned off then
the Newton will save your handwriting as handwriting and not convert it to
text -- Apple calls this "ink." This is faster and of course there are no
recognition errors to slow you down. On the other hand non-recognized text
because it is a compressed graphic takes up somewhat more memory then
recognized text. More importantly, only recognized text can be searched
through for automatic finds of word matches.
        It was a little disappointing to me that the Newton Intelligence,
in at least this first MessagePad, will not allow handwriting to be
recognized at a later time. I would like to see a feature whereby blocks
of handwritten text already stored as graphics could be selected and then
recognized. Apple tells me that they tested such "deferred recognition"
but that users did not like it.  Apple also ran into problems in that "we
couldn't store the strokes and timing info for too much ink because it
used too much memory." But, who knows what the future may hold?
        I will reserve judgment as to how reliable the handwriting
recognition works or as to the speed of the same until I am able to work
with a finalized unit as I was specifically told by Apple the beta unit I
was allowed to preview had been far surpassed by the release version in
those areas. This will be an important consideration and I will report
more fully on it when I have bought my own production unit.
        Selection is done as all things on a Newton with the pen. To
select a word, block of text and/or graphics the pen is held down and a
line drawn through or around the selection and then that selection
highlights. Once highlighted, the pen is held down on the block and then
the block follows the pen around and can thus be dragged to any position.
It becomes very easy to, for example, move words "into" a drawing to add
and position graphics within a memo. To place something in the clipboard
you just drag the text to the screen edge and then pull it down to copy it
into something else.
        Erasing an area is intuitively easy as you just draw a zig-zag
squiggly line through what you do not want and that material vanishes.
Other pen-based movement allows for rough editing such as drawing a
proofreader's "carat" or v-bumped line between words to add word spaces to
insert new words into a line of text.
        The Notepad area allows for notes to be entered sequentially to
the memory limit of the MessagePad. To enter a new note a horizontal line
is drawn across the screen and a new note's header (showing the time and
date the note was first entered) appears. At that point the up- and
down-arrow in the row of permanent icons may be used to scroll from note
to note. Or, the dot in the middle of the arrows (that at least one Apple
person called "the bellybutton") may be penned and a linelist of notes'
headers and first lines appear as an overview and individual notes may so
be immediately called onto the screen by selecting them from that overview
list. Notes may also be grouped into separate user-named or included
categories, filed and called up by category.
 
NAMES TO CONJURE WITH
        The Names File is a formal database/addressbook that works on the
idea of cards as stored in a card catalog. Adding names is done by filling
in an info view area line by line. Each line is entered via
text-recognition in a box that pops up for each entry. These linefields
include salutation, first name, last name, title, company name, address,
city, state, zip, country, EMAIL address, four phone fields (which can
individually be labeled as for home, work, fax, other, car beeper, mobile
or left as just being labeled phone) and birthday. Fields cannot be added,
rearranged as to order, nor labeled other then as provided.
        I found that this area of data entry was the only one in which I
found myself wishing for a real keyboard. When you are on the phone to a
client who blurts out their name is Mr. Slartibartfast or some such
monicker you can bet that the MessagePad is going to give you the silicon
equivalent of saying "Duh?" when you write it down the first time and
you'll be facing the virtual keyboard to hunt-and-pen the name into the
field. As mentioned previously, this is yet another reason why I hope to
see the ability to turn off text-recognition, write in a name or other
information, and then have it processed for recognition at a later time
when virtual keyboards aren't going to cramp your business style.
        Once you do have the names and other fields entered (or brought in
from a Wizard, another Newton or a Mac -- see the connectivity section
below) the MessagePad allows you to work with these records in many
different ways.
        Each record may have with it an associated, freeform notes field.
In the notes field you can jot down information supplemental to what's in
the card fields. You can use the area to track phone calls, mark favorite
orders, draw graphic figures and so on.
        A record may be shown onscreen as just an index-card style of
card, or a card can be shown with its note field. Or, the info view that
was filled in can be shown instead of having the information presented as
a card. The cards themselves can be shown in four different styles with
the fields positioned flush left or right, centered, or flush left with
the phone number flush right at the top.
        Cards can be found by using the Find permanent icon which will
search cards for text or dates, or by scrolling the cards via the arrow
icons or using the bellybutton (I love that name) icon to call up a list
or overview of cards available.
        Phone numbers may also be automatically dialed either through the
speaker or an attached modem.
        Cards may be printed, faxed or sent EMAIL and this is further
discussed in the connectivity area of this review.
        Although the capability of the MessagePad's Names File certainly
is within the bounds of expectation for an electronic personal organizer
such as a Sharp Wizard or Casio B.O.S.S. and in many ways exceeds those
bounds, I found myself wishing for more functionality. For example there
was no way to delete a set of cards. If, for example, a salesperson wants
to delete all Chicago clients she could call up such clients one by one by
using the Find command on the word Chicago. But each card found would have
to be individually deleted.  This reviewer kept reaching for a "groups"
command that simply wasn't there.  But Apple assures me that "There are at
least two third-party 'contact manager' type applications that will
provide this capability."
         I do think that the Names File will prove very useful to anyone
who simply needs an addressbook without many frills. Once the promised
third-party additions become available the Names File will become even
more powerful.
 
THE DATEBOOK COMPLEAT
        More then any other aspect of the MessagePad, the Dates area
demonstrates why -- leaving aside simple portability -- a pen-based
interface can be not just as good as mouse and/or keyboard -- but better.
The Datebook/Calendar and To-Do List section are what most advanced users
are likely to turn to when it comes time to demo the power of Newton.
        When the Dates area is called up the user is in the main Calendar
with the present month and date shown. Arrow keys either side of the
months name allow months to be scrolled forward and backward in time. And
a touch of the pen to a date in the calendar area brings up that date's
appointments. But then there are additional, hidden commands which add
much to this functionality.
        Shortcuts (such as tapping the year) allow the user to see eight
calendar months at a glance, to see several days at one time, to select
dates either horizontally (sequential days) or vertically (certain day in
each selected week), to see a two-week agenda of appointments or to even
see a graphic representation of a month where appointments on each day are
shown as dark bands.
        Scheduling and juggling appointments is easy. Just as selecting
words in a word processor became a way to show off the mouse on a Mac,
this process nicely shows off the pen interface on a Newton.
        Appointments are written in at the hour they begin. The
handwriting recognition translates that to type. At the beginning of an
appointment a diamond appears which can be "pulled" out into a vertical
line. The endtime of the appointment is scheduled by pulling this line
down the list of hours, Once an appointment is scheduled, it's fast and
simple to change. The pen is held down to highlight the vertical line and
then the line is dragged so as to begin at a different hour and, if
needed, the line is adjusted in length so as to cover a different amount
of time as well as a new position in the day. In a like manner the
appointment line can also be dragged between dates so as to change not
only the time but the day of the appointment. It's also possible to have
two appointments that overlap as the lines may be positioned indented from
simultaneously scheduled ones.
        I have seen similar interfaces using the mouse but the pen in this
handheld format is more ergonomic, more intuitive and has a tremendous
"gee whiz" factor such as everyone usually feels the first time they move
and resize a window on a Mac.
        Along with each appointment can be a notes field where the user
can add supplemental materials including graphics. A note field can also
be a stand-alone in that it's a note for the whole day or the calendar
field showing but not associated with any one particular appointment.
        Alarms may also be scheduled as reminders for any appointment. The
alarm can be scheduled to go off minutes, hours, or days ahead or just
when the appointment comes due. The alarm triggers and onscreen message
and can optionally play a sound. Alarms can also be set to repeat. They
can be made to repeat every week, every other week, every month, every
year, or on any one week of each month.
        Each datebook page of appointments also has a to-do list
associated with it. The to-do list allows you to schedule various items
that you need to do and to label them as to priority. Then, when you do
finally do them, you may check them off. When completed, they stay on that
date but, if not completed, they will roll over to the next day.
        Information from the calendar may be printed, faxed and otherwise
shared but see the connectivity discussion for more information on these
features.
        It's clear that the Datebook/Calendar may be a very big reason for
many people to go the Newton route.
 
CONNECTIVITY -- THE SERIAL STORY
        On the side of the Newton MessagePad is a 9-pin serial port such
as on all current Macs and on modems that connect to the Mac. Using that
connection point I was quickly able to hook the Newton to my Localtalk
network and have it access my LaserWriter IINTX using dialog boxes on the
Newton MessagePad similar to those found in the Macintosh Chooser. The
MessagePad happily printed cards, appointments, notes and graphics on the
networked laser printer.
        But a lot of the connectivity ability of the Newton MessagePad and
other Newtons to come will depend on the true functionality of Apple's
announced Newton Connection software for Macs and PCs as well as
third-party solutions. I was unable to preview a "Printer Pack" but Apple
tells me that this will allow direct connection to "lots of printers"
without connecting to the Desktop and that this will be done by printer
drivers in ROM residing on the connector itself.
        I have as yet been unable to personally work with Apple's Newton
Connection software or any third-party solutions. The following discussion
is based on my understanding of Apple's own press releases now in context
of having worked with the Newton MessagePad itself. As I obtain more
experience with these solution this article will be updated.
        It appears from Apple's press releases (of 6/29/93) that the
Newton Connection software will allow a Newton to be connected to a
Macintosh (or an IBM PC) through the serial port. Once connected it will
be possible, according to Apple, to backup information from the Newton to
the Mac's hard disk and then restore it to the Newton.
        The files will also be synchronized and this means that if
information is changed on either the Mac-resident file or the
Newton-resident file the older records will be updated when the machines
are connected. Synchronization at the record level (as opposed to file
level) means that if you and your secretary both add names to the address
book then not just the most recent file but the individual names will be
synchronized.
        The press release also states that their will be applications for
both the Mac and IBM PCs which will enable the Newton information as to
notes, letters, name cards, appointments and so forth not only to be
synchronized but also to be created and edited on the computer to be sent
to the Newton and vice-versa. Apple states it will also be possible to use
the Newton Connection software to move special and optional packages
ranging from system enhancements to applications from the Mac to the
Newton.
        There is further supposed to be released a Professional version
that will include translators so that users will be able to "directly
share their Newton information with popular Windows and Macintosh
graphics, word-processing, spreadsheet, database and PIM (Personal
Information Management) applications."
        On the one hand this is very good news. On the other I expect hat
many users will be expecting a built-in capability but will find it to be
offered as an extra-cost option. It does not take too long using the
Newton to realize that if you have a Mac (or PC) it would be
counterproductive and downright wasteful not to connect them. Neither does
it seem entirely a happy event that such connectivity is a separate
program rather then one of the permanent icons.  Apple is announcing
pricing of the various connectivity kits at the launch.
        If the majority of people who buy the Newton MessagePad own Macs
and IBM PCs it is likely that Apple will find themselves heavily
criticized for almost any price point by the majority of such demographic
customers. On the other hand, should the majority of MessagePad users turn
out to be computerless consumers such as statistically those who now buy
the majority of Wizards and B.O.S.S. organizers it might have been a wise
move on Apple's part to keep this separate from the main unit and thus
hold down basic entry-level costs. Like so much with the future of these
machines -- we must wait and see.
        Unfortunately, we must also wait, see, and pay if we want to make
the Newton all it should be by connecting it to our Macs.
        There are also third party solutions on the way to add even more
functionality to the MessagePad's serial port. Such things as directly
downloading and uploading software on existing major networks (such as
Compuserve) might quickly become possible following the introduction and
launch.
        Likewise, following the launch it should be clearer as to Apple's
own plans for some sort of network involving the Newton. Many choices in
the MessagePad seem to indicate that it will be possible to automatically
log onto a dedicated network from Apple to send information between
Newtons. According to Apple spokespeople, "The MessagePad ROM contains a
NewtonMail Client which will work as soon as NewtonMail becomes
operational later this fall."
        There is also a choice in many of the menus to fax such things as
notes, cards, appointments and to-do lists to fax machines. The
preliminary manual stated to connect the Newton to a "Newton fax modem."
Unfortunately such was not available to me. I did attempt to use a
Practical Peripherals PM14400FXSA v.32bis and then a DoveFax modem but
both failed -- the PP modem with a "modem not supported" error message and
the DoveFax with an even more sinister "modem not found" dialog. I assume
that the Newton modem does not use Hayes-compatible commands or that some
sort of driver software might be needed for non-Newton modems. (Or, this
could be attributed to the beta version software in the Newton I was
previewing.) Apple, however, has assured me that drivers will be available
for both external serial and PCMIA modems but could not yet comment as to
which exact modems will be supported.
        Again, as more information becomes available watch for future
versions of this article.
 
CONNECTIVITY -- BEAM ME ABOARD
        Newton owners will soon be beaming around the universe -- or at
least around the universe of Newton MessagePads. Two Newtons (or a Sharp
Wizard series 9000) may be connected via infrared beams instead of a cable
over which they can share information.
        When two Newtons are placed head-to-head (at a range of
approximately one meter) such things as notes, cards, appointments and
to-do lists may be "beamed" from one Newton to another (or the Wizard
series 9000). A nice touch is that incoming beams may be set to be
automatically received or that they need confirmation. If a need for
confirmation is checked then incoming beams are stored in an area called
the In Box and may be checked later and then moved to the main area of the
MessagePad.
        Just as the In Box stores incoming material (beamed or faxed or
serially connected) the Out Box will store outgoing material. It is thus
possible to set up a session ahead of time on your MessagePad for later
information exchange when the other Newton is present or when the
connection will be made. Both the In and Out boxes fully list their
contents and the status of those contents.
 
AN ABLE ASSISTANT
        The Newton's permanent icon called Assist when penned will call up
the Intelligent Assistant program. The Assistant features a dialog box
with a pulldown menu and one line. On the line you write text which is
acted upon by the command you choose from the menu.
        The commands in the Assistant's menu allow the user to schedule,
find, remind, send, fax, print, call and otherwise act upon whatever
information has been entered. For example, to call a phone number you
would write the phone number and then choose call from the Assistant's
"Let Me" menu -- forming the string "Let Me Call 555-1212" and the number
would be dialed via the modem or speaker as set in your preferences.
        But an interesting thing about this is that you do not have to be
actually within the Assist area. If you are in the Notepad and you type
"Call 555-1212" and highlight the command line, then pen down on Assist
the Newton will present you with the same dialog boxes to put through your
call as if you were running the Assist program directly.
        Likewise the Intelligent Assistant makes it simple to do such
things as schedule appointments, add to your to-do list, print or fax
notes and much more all without the modality of having to be in one
special program to do it (although the special program is there and with
additional helps should you choose it). So just write in the Notepad "Buy
Dog Food" and highlight it and the dialog box that results will have it
added immediately to you to-do list.  (Or write "Buy AT&T" -- your
option).
        In some respects the Intelligent Assistant rather points the way
toward the future of Newton and PIE technologies. The idea is for these
intelligent peripherals not just to act as pen and paper might, or even as
you might expect a desktop computer to perform. Rather, the goal seems to
be to have assistance in your daily life at your beck and call ready to
respond to simple English commands to accomplish relatively complicated
but omnipresent daily chores.
        The Newton MessagePad's personal assistant might not be a
human-looking, robotic servant ready to respond with a happy "Yes,
Master!" as it leaps to do your bidding but it may well be the first step
down a long road toward something far more real, far more achievable, far
more revolutionary.
 
EXTRAS, WE HAVE EXTRAS!
        In the Extras permanent icon (or the Extras "drawer') are accessed
some of the areas we have already spoken about such as the In and Out
Boxes, the computer and Sharp connectivity controls, the setting of
personal preferences and type styles. But there's much more included as
well such as the Tables area, the Calculator and Time Zones as well as
onscreen slide controls to set the MessagePad's volume level and contrast
adjustment as well as a visual indication of remaining battery life.
        The Tables are basically spreadsheet templates that are not called
spreadsheets. Metric conversion, currency exchange, loan payments, net
present value and a capital asset pricing model are the included
templates. The user just has to do such things as write in various
variables to have the MessagePad instantly display the results.
        There's even a game included that makes spending a few hours
writing words so as to train the recognition routines to your handwriting
fun.
 
IN CONCLUSION
        The Newton had to be something special to justify the hype and to
serve as a marker for the beginning of a whole new technology from Apple.
The new pen interface works well overall and, in some areas, proves that
the pen can be far mightier then the keyboard and even a bit stronger then
a mouse for certain uses.
        There is no doubt that future Newtons and other releases from the
PIE folks will be more powerful, offer more bang for the buck and feature
far more goodies -- just as the Macintosh 128K has been somewhat surpassed
by the Quadra 950! The pioneers who buy a Newton MessagePad in these early
days will, and perhaps not in a very long timeframe, see it surpassed by
other machines from Apple.
 
        So, should you wait to buy a Newton?
 
        In my opinion -- Don't Wait!
 
        I think the time to buy is now because if you can use the Newton
MessagePad's capabilities then it will serve you better then any other
such organizer presently on the market.
        1994 is going to be a lot like the heady days of 1984 when the
Macintosh was released. Get in now on the thrill and challenge of a whole
new technology, a new way to think about your life and how to schedule it.
You won't be able to completely enjoy the future without living in today.
        Today it's the Newton MessagePad that will deliver tomorrow into
your grasp.
 
----- END -----

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