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MEDLIB-L  May 1996, Week 1

MEDLIB-L May 1996, Week 1

Subject:

Re: Ankylosing Spondylitis

From:

Naina Pandita <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Medical Libraries Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 2 May 1996 10:23:31 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (1731 lines)

Here are some refs from MEDLINE data (1996-95). If you can access this
database, you will get a whole lot of information.
 
 
                                                  DOCUMENT: 1 of 78
 
UI: 93368296
AU: Hermann E; Yu DT  ; Meyer zum B uschenfelde KH  ; Fleischer B
TI: HLA-B27-restricted   CD8   T   cells   derived from synovial fluids of
    patients  with  reactive  arthritis  and  ankylosing  spondylitis [see
    comments]
AD: First  Department of Medicine, Johannes-Gutenberg-University of Mainz,
    Germany.
AB: Ankylosing  spondylitis  and seronegative spondylarthropathies such as
    Reiter's  syndrome and reactive arthritis are strongly associated with
    HLA-B27.  However,  the  mechanisms  by  which  HLA-B27 is involved in
    disease  susceptibility  and  pathogenesis are unknown. If the disease
    association  is  a  consequence of HLA-B27's physiological function in
    antigen  presentation,  the  disease should be mediated by cytotoxic T
    lymphocytes   (CTLs)   that   recognise   bacterial   or self peptides
    presented  by  HLA-B27.  Proof  of  this  arthritogenic  peptide model
    requires  isolation  of  B27-restricted  CD8  T  cells  from arthritic
    joints  of  patients  with spondylarthropathies. An important question
    is  whether  "arthritogenic"  bacteria  such as yersinia or salmonella
    can  generate  HLA-B27-restricted  bacteria-specific CTLs. We describe
    such  HLA-B27-restricted CTLs. We tested a panel of 354 alpha beta-TCR
    CD8  T  lymphocyte  clones  (TLCs)  that  had  been  derived  from the
    synovial  fluid  of  4 patients with reactive arthritis and 2 patients
    with   ankylosing   spondylitis.   In  1 patient with yersinia-induced
    arthritis,   2   TLCs   were   identified   that   killed specifically
    yersinia-infected   B27   target   cells.   In   another  patient with
    salmonella-induced   arthritis,   1   B27-restricted   CD8   TLC  that
    recognised  both salmonella and yersinia was identified. In 5 of the 6
    patients   autoreactive   CTLs   were   found,   5   of   which showed
    B27-restricted  killing  of uninfected cell lines. B27-restricted CTLs
    with  specificity for arthritogenic bacteria or autoantigens provide a
    missing   link   in   the   pathogenesis   of   the HLA-B27-associated
    spondylarthropathies.
CM: Comment in:Lancet1993 Sep 11;342(8872):629; Comment in:Lancet1993 Nov
    20;342(8882):1307
SO: Lancet 1993 Sep 11;342 (8872):646-50
                                                  DOCUMENT: 2 of 78
 
UI: 95265962
AU: Viitanen JV; Kautiainen H  ; Suni J  ; Kokko ML  ; Lehtinen K
TI: The  relative  value  of  spinal and thoracic mobility measurements in
    ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tampere, Finland.
AB: The  relative  value of nine spinal and thoracic mobility measurements
    was  investigated in 73 male patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS)
    .  The value of a test was obtained by the relative ranks of validity,
    reliability  and  sensitivity  to  change.  Validity was determined as
    age-adjusted   correlation   of   the   test   result with AS-specific
    radiological  changes  in the lumbar spine. Reliability was determined
    as  inter-observer  error.  Sensitivity  to  change  was determined as
    change  in  test result during an intensive rehabilitation course. The
    five most valuable tests were rotation of the thoracolumbar spine (TR)
    ,finger-to-floor   distance   (FFD)  , the Schober test, thoracolumbar
    flexion   and   occiput-to-wall   distance.   Of   these, FFD had high
    reliability   and   sensitivity   ranks,   but   poor correlation with
    AS-specific  spinal  changes.  TR  had  high  validity and sensitivity
    ranks,  and  improvement  of the measurement technology would probably
    result  in  a  superior  test for the follow-up of AS. Chest expansion
    and vital capacity had low ranks in all comparisons.
 
SO: Scand J Rheumatol 1995;24 (2):94-7
                                                  DOCUMENT: 3 of 78
 
UI: 95266048
AU: Viitanen JV; Kokko ML  ; Lehtinen K  ; Suni J  ; Kautiainen H
TI: Correlation  between  mobility  restrictions and radiologic changes in
    ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tampere, Finland.
AB: STUDY  DESIGN.  In  151 adult patients with ankylosing spondylitis who
    participated  in  an inpatient rehabilitation program of 3-4 weeks, 10
    different  range  of  motion  (ROM)  values  were  measured, and their
    lumbar  spine  and sacroiliac joints were radiographed. OBJECTIVES. To
    determine  whether  a  correlation obtained between restriction of ROM
    and  progression  of  radiologic  findings  in ankylosing spondylitis,
    together   with   a   high   enough reliability level in measurements.
    SUMMARY  OF  BACKGROUND  DATA.  A significant correlation was observed
    between   the   restriction   of   eight   ROMs:   the   Schober test,
    thoracolumbar   rotation,   thoracolumbar  flexion, cervical rotation,
    occiput-wall    distance,    chin-chest    distance,  chest expansion,
    finger-floor  distance,  and overall radiologic changes in both lumbar
    spine  and  sacroiliac  joints;  straight leg raise did not correlate,
    and  vital  capacity  only  with  sacroiliac joint changes. Spearman's
    correlation  coefficients  for  ROMs  were  slightly  higher to lumbar
    spine  changes  than  to  sacroiliac  joint  changes.  A corresponding
    correlation  was  also  observed  between spinal mobility restrictions
    and  six  detailed  changes  in  lumbar roentgenogram: syndesmophytes,
    apophyseal   arthritis,   sclerotic   anterior   borders of vertebrae,
    straightened   anterior   surface   of  vertebrae, and ossification of
    interspinous   and   anterior   longitudinal ligaments. Other detailed
    lumbar  spine  findings  did not correlate. As assessed by erythrocyte
    sedimentation  rate  values  the  disease  activity  increased  in the
    course  of  radiologic  progression, decreasing again, however, to the
    end  stage.  METHODS.  Conventional  methods  with  a tape and (Myrin)
    inclinometer  were  used  to  measure  thoracolumbar flexion, cervical
    rotation,  occiput-wall  distance,  chin-chest  distance, finger-floor
    distance,  chest expansion, vital capacity, and straight leg raise. In
    addition,   a   new   method   of   thoracolumbar   rotation and a new
    modification   of   the   Schober   test  were introduced. Thirty-nine
    patients  were  randomized for a reliability assessment using repeated
    measurements  of  ROMs. Radiologic changes were evaluated (in a masked
    fashion)  using the method of Dale and Vinje. RESULTS. The reliability
    of  all  ROMs  was  good (except for interrater intraclass correlation
    coefficients   of   chest   expansion:   0.53). CONCLUSIONS: The clear
    correlation  between  radiologic  sacroiliac  joint  and  lumbar spine
    progression  and  eight  ROMs showed that these are useful noninvasive
    measurements   of   disease   progression   and severity in ankylosing
    spondylitis that can be used in daily practice.
 
SO: Spine 1995 Feb 15;20 (4):492-6
                                                  DOCUMENT: 4 of 78
 
UI: 95269218
AU: Kuo SC; Kao HC  ; Liu CL  ; Yu WK  ; Lo WH
TI: Surgical   treatment   of   extensive   discovertebral  destruction in
    ankylosing spondylitis: a report of two cases.
AD: Department   of   Orthopedics   and   Traumatology,   Veterans General
    Hospital-Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C.
AB: Extensive  discovertebral  destruction  in  ankylosing  spondylitis is
    rare  and  difficult  in diagnosis and management. We present two such
    cases  who  were treated with anterior decompression, autogenous strut
    iliac  bone  graft and fixed with anterior locking plate system (ALPS)
    instrumentation.  After  operation the patients' symptoms improved and
    the  spinal  deformities  were corrected. Our experiences in these two
    patients   emphasize   the   importance   of  early recognition, early
    detection and aggressive surgical treatment in the lesion.
 
SO: Chung Hua I Hsueh Tsa Chih (Taipei) 1995 Feb;55 (2):189-94
                                                  DOCUMENT: 5 of 78
 
UI: 95282144
AU: L opez-Larrea C; Sujirachato K  ; Mehra NK  ; Chiewsilp P  ; Isarangkura D
    ; Kanga U  ; Dominguez O  ; Coto E  ; Pen~a M  ; Seti en F  ; et al
TI: HLA-B27   subtypes   in   Asian  patients with ankylosing spondylitis.
    Evidence for new associations.
AD: Hospital Central de Asturias, Oviedo, Spain.
AB: The  aim  of  this  study  was  to investigate the contribution of the
    different  B27 subtypes to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) susceptibility.
    The   polymerase   chain   reaction   (PCR)   in  combination with the
    sequence-specific  oligonucleotide  probes  (SSOs) was used to analyse
    the  polymorphism  in exon 2 and 3 of HLA-B27 in two Asian groups with
    different   genetic   HLA   structures:   Indian   (I)   and  Thai (T)
    populations.  The  same  number  of  AS  patients (45) and healthy B27
    positive  donors (n = 17) from both populations were analysed in order
    to  ascertain  the  B27  subtypes.  Three  different  findings  can be
    concluded  from  this study: 1) B*2707 has been found to be associated
    with  AS in both populations. This association has not been previously
    reported  in  either  ethnic  group.  2) B*2704 is strongly associated
    with  AS in the Thai patients (91% in AS vs. 47% in C; RR = 11.5; EF =
    0.83) .  In contrast, B*2704 was found with similar frequency in Asian
    Indians  AS patients and controls (41% in AS vs. 41% in C.). 3) B*2706
    was  found  overrepresented  in  control  populations and absent in AS
    patients  (0%  in  AS  vs. 47% in C.; pc < 10(-6)) showing the maximum
    value   of   protective   fraction   (PF   =   1). The B*2706 negative
    association  with AS has not been previously described in other ethnic
    groups  and  could  indicate a protective effect of this subtype on AS
    susceptibility.  The  B*2706 allele has two changes relative to B*2704
    at  residue  114 (His to Asp) and 116 (Asp to Tyr) in the pockets D/E.
    The  importance that these differences can play in the pathogenesis of
    AS are discussed.
 
SO: Tissue Antigens 1995 Mar;45 (3):169-76
                                                  DOCUMENT: 6 of 78
 
UI: 95285640
AU: Maksymowych WP; Russell AS
TI: Polymorphism  in  the LMP2 gene influences the relative risk for acute
    anterior uveitis in unselected patients with ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton.
AB: Although   human   leukocyte   antigen   (HLA)   B27 has been directly
    implicated   in   the   pathogenesis   of  ankylosing spondylitis (AS)
    ,additional  evidence favours the involvement of an additional genetic
    factor(s) .  In a previous population analysis of AS patients selected
    for  a  history of acute anterior uveitis (AAU), we had demonstrated a
    phenotypic   association   between   polymorphism   in   an HLA-linked
    proteasome   subunit   gene,   LMP2,   and  the development of AAU and
    peripheral  arthritis.  In  the  present  study,  we have assessed the
    relative  risk  of  homozygosity  for  the  LMP2 arginine variant, the
    disease-associated  genotype, for these complications in an unselected
    group  of  86  patients  with  AS  seen  sequentially in 1 centre by 1
    rheumatologist  over  a  2-y  period. LMP2 genotyping was performed by
    polymerase  chain  reaction-restriction  fragment  length polymorphism
    (PCR-RFLP)  using  the  CfoI  restriction enzyme. Homozygosity for the
    LMP2  arginine  variants  was observed in 68.4% of AS patients who had
    had  AAU  as compared to 41.7% without AAU (relative risk 3.0; chi 2 =
    6.1,  p  <  0.02) .  The  proportion  of  AS  patients with peripheral
    arthritis  homozygous  for  the arginine residue was 55.2% as compared
    to  52.6% without this complication (relative risk 1.1; p > 0.05). Our
    data  suggest  a  primary  association with the development of AAU and
    provide   evidence   for   genetic  heterogeneity in distinct clinical
    subgroups of patients with AS as a basis for phenotypic variation.
 
SO: Clin Invest Med 1995 Feb;18 (1):42-6
                                                  DOCUMENT: 7 of 78
 
UI: 95292447
AU: Jamieson AH; Alford CA  ; Bird HA  ; Hindmarch I  ; Wright V
TI: The  effect  of  sleep  and nocturnal movement on stiffness, pain, and
    psychomotor performance in ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Rheumatology  and  Rehabilitation  Research  Unit,  Research School of
    Medicine, University of Leeds, UK.
AB: OBJECTIVE.  This  study  was carried out in order to assess whether AS
    patients  are adversely affected by a "good" night's sleep accompanied
    by   little   nocturnal   movement.  METHODS. Objective and subjective
    nocturnal   movement,   flexibility,   stiffness, pain and psychomotor
    performance   were   measured   in   22   subjects, 11 with ankylosing
    spondylitis  and  11  controls. RESULTS. A better sleep integrity with
    little   nocturnal   movement   was   related  to a decrease in lumbar
    flexibility.  Difficulty  in awakening and feeling tired and clumsy in
    the  morning  correlated  with  stiffness.  Pain was correlated with a
    subjective  difficulty  in  getting  to  sleep  and a worse quality of
    sleep,  but  was also correlated with less objective sleep disruption.
    In  the  control group a better sleep integrity was correlated with an
    overnight  decrease  in  psychomotor  performance.  In the spondylitic
    group  a  significant  increase in performance occurred. Stiffness and
    pain   did   not   correlate   with  performance. CONCLUSION. Sleep in
    ankylosing spondylitis differs from sleep in normals.
 
SO: Clin Exp Rheumatol 1995 Jan-Feb;13 (1):73-8
                                                  DOCUMENT: 8 of 78
 
UI: 95293565
AU: Schnabel A
TI: [Manifestation   of   thrombocytopenia   of   70, 000/microliters in a
    30-year-old patient with ankylosing spondylitis]
AD: Rheumatologische  Poliklinik,  Medizinische  Universit at L ubeck, Bad
    Bramstedt.
 
SO: Internist (Berl) 1995 Apr;36 (4):411-2
                                                  DOCUMENT: 9 of 78
 
UI: 95307881
AU: Dougados M
TI: Diagnostic features of ankylosing spondylitis [editorial]
 
SO: Br J Rheumatol 1995 Apr;34 (4):301-3
                                                  DOCUMENT: 10 of 78
 
UI: 95307910
AU: M aki-Ikola O; Nissil a M  ; Lehtinen K  ; Leirisalo-Repo M  ; Toivanen P
    ; Granfors K
TI: Antibodies  to  Klebsiella  pneumoniae,  Escherichia  coli and Proteus
    mirabilis  in  the  sera of patients with axial and peripheral form of
    ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: National Public Health Institute, Department in Turku, Finland.
AB: IgM,  IgG  and IgA class serum antibodies against the whole Klebsiella
    pneumoniae,  Escherichia  coli and Proteus mirabilis bacteria, as well
    as  against  K. pneumoniae and E. coli lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) were
    studied  earlier  in  two  separate  patient  populations of 99 and 85
    patients  with  ankylosing  spondylitis  (AS) and in 102 healthy blood
    donors  by enzyme immunoassay. In this study the patients were divided
    into  groups  according  to  the  presence  or  absence  of peripheral
    arthritis.  The  patients with peripheral type AS had increased levels
    of  IgM  and  IgA  class antibodies against K. pneumoniae, whereas the
    patients  with axial type AS had increased levels of IgG and IgA class
    antibodies  to  K. pneumoniae, as well as IgA class antibodies against
    E.  coli and P. mirabilis bacteria. Sulphasalazine treatment decreased
    the  IgM  and  IgA  class  antibodies  in  peripheral AS and IgA class
    antibodies  in axial AS against K.. pneumoniae LPS. The antibody levels
    were  also  decreased against E. coli and P. mirabilis bacteria in the
    sera   of   patients   with   axial  AS. The immunological findings in
    patients  with  peripheral  and  axial  form of AS were different from
    each   other   and   thus   may   reflect  different aetiopathogenetic
    mechanisms for these two types of AS.
 
SO: Br J Rheumatol 1995 May;34 (5):413-7
                                                  DOCUMENT: 11 of 78
 
UI: 95307911
AU: M aki-Ikola O; Lehtinen K  ; Toivanen P  ; Granfors K
TI: Antibodies  to  Klebsiella  pneumoniae,  Escherichia  coli and Proteus
    mirabilis  in the sera of ankylosing spondylitis patients with/without
    iritis and enthesitis.
AD: National Public Health Institute, Department in Turku, Finland.
AB: IgM,  IgG  and IgA class serum antibodies against the whole Klebsiella
    pneumoniae,  Escherichia  coli and Proteus mirabilis bacteria, as well
    as  against  K. pneumoniae and E. coli lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) were
    studied   earlier   in   the   sera   of   98 patients with ankylosing
    spondylitis   (AS)   and   in   102   healthy   blood donors by enzyme
    immunoassay.  In  this  study  the  patients  were divided into groups
    according  to the clinical picture, i.e. presence or absence of iritis
    and  enthesitis.  The  previous  major  finding of increased IgA class
    antibody  levels  against  the  whole  K.  pneumoniae  bacteria  in AS
    patients  when  compared  to the healthy controls was not specifically
    associated  with  any  single  patient  group  in  the  present study.
    However,  the  patients  with  iritis  had  higher levels of IgA class
    antibodies  to  LPS  of K. pneumoniae and E. coli when compared to the
    patients  without iritis. In addition, the patients without enthesitis
    had  higher  level of IgG class antibodies against whole K. pneumoniae
    bacteria  compared  to the patients with enthesitis. The increased IgA
    class  antibody  levels  against  K.  pneumoniae and E. coli LPS in AS
    patients  with  iritis  may reflect an inflammatory process in the gut
    area.   Furthermore,   there   were   certain other differences in the
    immunological  parameters  between  the  AS  patients with and without
    iritis  or  enthesitis and the possibility that they reflect different
    mechanisms involved in the disease processes cannot be excluded.
 
SO: Br J Rheumatol 1995 May;34 (5):418-20
                                                  DOCUMENT: 12 of 78
 
UI: 95307933
AU: K uc ukdeveci AA; Kutlay S  ; Seckin B  ; Arasil T
TI: Tarsal tunnel syndrome in ankylosing spondylitis [letter]
 
SO: Br J Rheumatol 1995 May;34 (5):488-9
                                                  DOCUMENT: 13 of 78
 
UI: 95308865
AU: Tyrrell PN; Davies AM  ; Evans N  ; Jubb RW
TI: Signal   changes   in   the   intervertebral   discs   on   MRI of the
    thoracolumbar spine in ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: MRI Centre, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham, UK.
AB: Contrary  to  standard  teaching  in  magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
    ,recent  reports  have  documented calcification appearing as areas of
    increased  signal intensity (SI) on T1-weighted images. Intervertebral
    disc  calcification  is  a  frequent finding on radiographs in chronic
    ankylosing  spondylitis  (AS). This study was performed to investigate
    the  appearance  of  variable  degrees  of  disc calcification in MRI.
    Thirty-six  patients  with  AS  of  variable duration underwent an MRI
    scan  of the thoraco-lumbar spine and the MR appearances, particularly
    of  the  discs,  were compared with plain radiographs. Increased SI of
    the  discs  on  T1-weighted  images  were  found in 17 of 36 patients,
    occurring  over  a  range  of  disc  levels, and correlating with disc
    calcification  on  the  radiographs in 78% of cases. This group tended
    to  be  older  and  have  a longer duration of disease than those with
    normal  appearing  discs.  Four different patterns of increased signal
    within  the  discs  termed Type A (marginal), Type B (annular), Type C
    (central)  and Type D (solid) were identified. In those with less than
    six  discs  involved Type A was the most common pattern. In those with
    more  than  six  discs  involved  Type  D was the most common pattern,
    suggesting  a  progression  of  disc  involvement  with  more advanced
    disease.  Although  these  findings  will not affect the management of
    the  disease,  they  do highlight the recently described phenomenon of
    calcification  appearing as increased SI on T1-weighted images, likely
    to  be related to the surface area of the calcium crystal. This should
    lead  to the consideration of calcium in the differential diagnosis of
    increased  SI  on  T1-weighted images. End-plate marrow changes were a
    relatively  frequent  finding in this study but did not correlate with
    the  signal  changes  seen within the discs; in a number of cases they
    related to variable degrees of bony bridging.
 
SO: Clin Radiol 1995 Jun;50 (6):377-83
                                                  DOCUMENT: 14 of 78
 
UI: 95308916
AU: Sant SM; O'Connell D
TI: Cauda  equina  syndrome  in  ankylosing spondylitis: a case report and
    review of the literature.
AD: Department   of   Rheumatology,  Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Dublin,
    Ireland.
AB: The  cauda  equina  syndrome  (CES)  is an infrequently recognised and
    poorly  understood  complication  of  ankylosing  spondylitis (AS). We
    report  a  case of CES with enlarged caudal sac and multiple posterior
    arachnoid  diverticula  eroding  the  laminae and spinous processes of
    the  lumbosacral  vertebrae  in  a  patient with long-standing AS. The
    diagnosis  was  established  using  computerised  tomography  (CT) and
    magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
RF: 13
SO: Clin Rheumatol 1995 Mar;14 (2):224-6
                                                  DOCUMENT: 15 of 78
 
UI: 95311269
AU: Calin A
TI: The   Dunlop-Dottridge   Lecture.   Ankylosing   spondylitis: defining
    disease  status  and  the  relationship  between radiology, metrology,
    disease activity, function, and outcome.
AD: Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK.
RF: 42
SO: J Rheumatol 1995 Apr;22 (4):740-4
                                                  DOCUMENT: 16 of 78
 
UI: 95317135
AU: Liu Y; Xu B  ; Cai X
TI: [The   role   of   intestinal   permeability   in  the pathogenesis of
    ankylosing spondylitis]
AD: Department   of   Rheumatology,   First   Military Medical University,
    Guangzhou.
AB: By  use of low molecular weight polyethlene glycol (PEG400) as tracer,
    a  revised  Chedwick method with capillary gas chromatography was used
    to  examine  the  intestinal  permeability  in  49  subjects including
    patients  with  ankylosing  spondylitis  (AS) and rheumatoid arthritis
    (RA)  and  healthy  controls.  Recovery  percentage,  maximal recovery
    percentage  [Rmax(%) ] and  Rmax(w)  were  used  to find the effect of
    bowel  permeability in the pathogenesis and disease flare up of AS, as
    well  as  the  role of HLA-B27 for the bowel permeability. The results
    showed  that  in  AS group, the recovery of first component (242D) was
    higher  and  the  Rmax(%)  was  lower  than  those in the controls. No
    statistical  difference  was  found  with  other  indexes. The results
    indicated  that  bowel permeability is not elevated in AS. The passage
    of  enteral  bacteria  antigen  into  the host may not result from the
    process  of  nonspecific  penetration.  We  postulate  that  there may
    somehow  be  a  process of "active transportation" in the pathogenesis
    of  AS.  More  studies  of  the  process  are necessary to clarify its
    importance in the early stage of AS.
 
SO: Chung Hua Nei Ko Tsa Chih 1995 Feb;34 (2):91-4
                                                  DOCUMENT: 17 of 78
 
UI: 95325376
AU: Harley JB; Scofield RH
TI: The spectrum of ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Endocrinology  and  Metabolism  Section, University of Oklahoma Health
    Sciences Center, USA.
AB: Sacroiliac  involvement  is  an  early hallmark, but even so, patients
    with  ankylosing spondylitis present a remarkable spectrum of disease.
    Research  probing  associations  among  spondylitis, enteric bacterial
    infection,  and  host  expression of HLA-B27 may offer etiologic clues
    and point the way to disease-specific therapies.
 
SO: Hosp Pract (Off Ed) 1995 Jul 15;30 (7):37-43, 46
                                                  DOCUMENT: 18 of 78
 
UI: 95330303
AU: Kallel MH; Bejia I  ; Fourni e B  ; Fourni e A
TI: Behcet syndrome with ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Department   of   Rheumatology,   Toulouse   Purpan Teaching Hospital,
    France.
AB: Two  HLA  B27-positive  patients  with concomitant Behcet syndrome and
    ankylosing   spondylitis   are   reported.  The relevant literature is
    reviewed and the meaning of this combination discussed.
 
SO: Rev Rhum Engl Ed 1995 Apr;62 (4):295-9
                                                  DOCUMENT: 19 of 78
 
UI: 95122583
AU: van Royen BJ; Slot GH
TI: Closing-wedge  posterior osteotomy for ankylosing spondylitis. Partial
    corporectomy and transpedicular fixation in 22 cases.
AD: Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
AB: From   1990   to   1993   we   treated 22 consecutive patients who had
    progressive   spinal   kyphosis   due   to ankylosing spondylitis by a
    closing-wedge  posterior vertebral osteotomy with partial corporectomy
    of  L4  and  transpedicular  fixation.  The  average correction was 32
    degrees  (24  to 52) with a mean loss of correction after operation of
    2.7  degrees  (0  to  13) . The average operating time was 185 minutes
    (135  to 240) and blood loss was 2500 ml (1200 to 5000). The osteotomy
    corrected  all  patients  sufficiently  to allow them to see ahead and
    their  posture was improved. There were no fatal complications, but in
    two  cases  there  was  failure of the instrumentation and one patient
    needed  reoperation  for  nerve compression. Two deep wound infections
    required  removal of the implant and six patients had superficial skin
    infections  under  the  plaster.  The  use  of a circoelectric bed and
    intermittent prone lying eliminated this problem.
 
SO: J Bone Joint Surg Br 1995 Jan;77 (1):117-21
                                                  DOCUMENT: 20 of 78
 
UI: 95138945
AU: Cooper C; Carbone L  ; Michet CJ  ; Atkinson EJ  ; O'Fallon WM  ; Melton
    LJ 3rd
TI: Fracture  risk  in  patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a population
    based study.
AD: Department   of   Health   Sciences  Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester,
    Minnesota.
AB: OBJECTIVE.  To  assess  the  risk  of  fractures  among  patients with
    ankylosing  spondylitis (AS). METHODS. A population based cohort study
    compared  fracture  incidence in an inception cohort of 158 Rochester,
    Minnesota  residents  newly  diagnosed  with  AS between 1935 and 1989
    with  expected  rates  from  the  same  community.  RESULTS.  In 2,398
    person-years  of  observation,  there  was  no increase in the risk of
    limb  fractures,  but  there  was a pronounced increase in the risk of
    thoracolumbar  compression  fractures  (standardized morbidity ratio =
    7.6;  95%  CI,  4.3-12.6)  among those with AS. CONCLUSION. These data
    point  to  the  importance  of  measures  aimed  at  maintaining axial
    skeletal status in patients with AS.
 
SO: J Rheumatol 1994 Oct;21 (10):1877-82
                                                  DOCUMENT: 21 of 78
 
UI: 95055471
AU: Bakker C; Rutten-van M olken M  ; Hidding A  ; van Doorslaer E  ; Bennett
    K  ; van der Linden S
TI: Patient  utilities  in ankylosing spondylitis and the association with
    other outcome measures.
AD: Department  of  Internal  Medicine, University of Limburg, Maastricht,
    The Netherlands.
AB: OBJECTIVE.  To  compare  in  patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS)
    utilities  derived  by  rating  scale  and  standard gamble method, to
    relate  these  values  to  other  outcome  measures, and to assess the
    sensitivity  to  change  of  utilities  relative  to  changes in other
    outcomes.  METHODS. Patients with AS were randomly allocated to either
    weekly  sessions  of supervised group physical therapy for a period of
    9  months  or  daily exercises at home. Analysis was restricted to the
    59   patients   who   completed   the   Maastricht Utility Measurement
    Questionnaire  (MUMQ) at baseline and after 9 months' followup and who
    were  seen  by  the  same  interviewer.  Reliability  was  assessed by
    intraclass   correlation   coefficient   and  change scores for marker
    states  of  disease.  Construct  validity was evaluated by correlation
    and  multiple  regression of baseline values with a variety of disease
    outcomes   (pain   and   stiffness,   patient's and physician's global
    assessment,  Sickness  Impact Profile, Health Assessment Questionnaire
    for  the  Spondyloarthropathies,  Arthritis  Impact Measurement Scale,
    functional,   articular,   and   enthesis  indices and spinal mobility
    measures) .  Sensitivity  to  change  was  assessed against changes in
    these   outcome   measures   at   followup.   RESULTS. The test-retest
    intraclass  correlation  coefficients  for patient utilities were 0.95
    (rating  scale)  and  0.79 (standard gamble), and for the marker state
    of  mild  disease  0.70  (rating  scale) and 0.77 (standard gamble). A
    multiple   regression   analysis   with   the baseline rating scale or
    standard  gamble utilities as dependent variable showed that patient's
    global   assessment   explained   59   and   11% of the total variance
    respectively.  By  multiple regression analysis 10% of the variance of
    change   in   rating   scale   utilities   was explained by changes of
    patient's  global  assessment.  In  contrast,  variance  in  change in
    standard  gamble  utilities  was  not  explained  by  changes in other
    disease  outcomes.  CONCLUSION.  Findings obtained by rating scale and
    standard  gamble  differ  considerably. Standard gamble utilities seem
    to  address  different  aspects  of health status than do rating scale
    utilities   and   more   traditional  outcomes. Utility measurement is
    sensitive to the method chosen to elicit patient well being.
 
SO: J Rheumatol 1994 Jul;21 (7):1298-304
                                                  DOCUMENT: 22 of 78
 
UI: 95185918
AU: J arvinen P
TI: Occurrence of ankylosing spondylitis in a nationwide series of twins.
AD: Rheumatism Foundation Hospital, Heinola, Finland.
AB: OBJECTIVE.  To  obtain  information  on  the  rate  of concordance for
    ankylosing  spondylitis  (AS)  in  a population-based series of twins.
    METHODS.   AS   cases   were   identified   by   record linkage of the
    population-based  Finnish  Twin Cohort and the nationwide registry for
    fully  reimbursed medications. A clinical examination was performed to
    establish  concordance  for AS. RESULTS. There were 6 monozygotic (MZ)
    pairs  and  20 dizygotic (DZ) pairs with at least 1 member affected by
    AS.  Three  MZ  pairs  and 3 DZ pairs were concordant for the disease.
    All  affected subjects were HLA-B27 positive. The pairwise concordance
    rate  was  50%  in  MZ twins and 20% in HLA-B27 positive DZ twins (95%
    confidence   intervals   11.8-88.2%   and   4.3%-48.1%, respectively).
    CONCLUSION.  These  results  indicate  that  AS  disease expression is
    largely,  but  not  entirely,  genetically based, with a gene or genes
    other than B27 probably playing a role.
 
SO: Arthritis Rheum 1995 Mar;38 (3):381-3
                                                  DOCUMENT: 23 of 78
 
UI: 95196288
AU: Kumar CM; Mehta M
TI: Ankylosing  spondylitis:  lateral  approach  to spinal anaesthesia for
    lower limb surgery.
AD: South Cleveland Hospital, Middlesbrough, UK.
AB: We  describe  three patients with long-standing ankyolsing spondylitis
    (AS)  who underwent lower limb joint surgery under spinal anaesthesia.
    At  preoperative  assessment, it was considered that intubation of the
    trachea  was likely to be difficult or impossible and previous general
    anaesthesia  was associated with increased morbidity. Midline approach
    spinal  anaesthesia  failed  but  the lateral approach was successful.
    Spinal  anaesthesia  was  induced  using  a  24 gauge Sprotte (Pajunk)
    needle  with 3.5 ml heavy bupivacaine 0.5% at the L3-4 interspace with
    the  patients  in  the  sitting  position.  This  resulted in adequate
    sensory  blockade  for  the  surgical  procedure. None of the patients
    required  airway interventions but equipment and aids to secure airway
    were available.
 
SO: Can J Anaesth 1995 Jan;42 (1):73-6
                                                  DOCUMENT: 24 of 78
 
UI: 95205472
AU: Peh WC; Ho EK
TI: Fracture of the odontoid peg in ankylosing spondylitis: case report.
AD: Department  of  Diagnostic  Radiology,  University of Hong Kong, Queen
    Mary Hospital.
AB: Fractures  in  patients with ankylosing spondylitis tend to affect the
    lower  cervical  spine.  We  describe  a 50-year-old man who sustained
    fractures  of  the  odontoid  peg  and  body  of  the  second cervical
    vertebra    after    a    hyperextension    injury.    In   absence of
    atlanto-occipital   fusion,   deformity   from previous lower cervical
    spine  injury  may  have  contributed  to susceptibility for this very
    rare  combination  of  fractures.  The  patient was treated surgically
    with a good result.
 
SO: J Trauma 1995 Mar;38 (3):361-3
                                                  DOCUMENT: 25 of 78
 
UI: 95207448
AU: Weiss HA; Darby SC  ; Fearn T  ; Doll R
TI: Leukemia mortality after X-ray treatment for ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Imperial  Cancer Research Fund Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of
    Oxford, Radcliffe Infirmary, United Kingdom.
AB: Leukemia  mortality  has  been  studied  in  14, 767  adult ankylosing
    spondylitis  patients  diagnosed  between  1935 and 1957 in the United
    Kingdom,  of  whom  13, 914  patients  received  X-ray treatment. By 1
    January  1992,  there  were  60  leukemia  deaths among the irradiated
    patients,  almost  treble  that expected from national rates. Leukemia
    mortality  was  not increased among unirradiated patients. Among those
    irradiated,  the  ratio  of  observed  to expected deaths for leukemia
    other  than  chronic  lymphocytic  leukemia was greatest in the period
    1-5  years  after  the  first treatment (ratio = 11.01, 95% confidence
    interval  5.26-20.98)  and  decreased to 1.87 (95% confidence interval
    0.94-3.36)  in the 25+ year period. There was no significant variation
    in  this  ratio  with  sex  or  age  at first treatment. The ratio for
    chronic   lymphocytic   leukemia   was  slightly but not significantly
    raised  (ratio  =  1.44,  95%  confidence  interval  0.62-2.79) . Most
    irradiated  patients  received all their exposure within a year. Based
    on  a  1  in 15 random sample, the mean total marrow dose was 4.38 Gy.
    Doses  were  nonuniform,  with  heaviest doses to the lower spine. The
    risk  for  nonchronic lymphocytic leukemia was adequately described by
    a  linear-exponential  model  that  allowed  for cell sterilization in
    heavily  exposed  parts  of  the  marrow  and time since exposure. Ten
    years  after  first  exposure, the linear component of excess relative
    risk  was  12.37  per  Gy (95% confidence interval 2.25-52.07), and it
    was  estimated  that  cell  sterilization  reduced the excess relative
    risk  by  47%  at  1 Gy (95% confidence interval 17%-79%). The average
    predicted  relative  risk in the period 1-25 years after exposure to a
    uniform dose of 1 Gy was 7.00.
 
SO: Radiat Res 1995 Apr;142 (1):1-11
                                                  DOCUMENT: 26 of 78
 
UI: 95213992
AU: Calin A; Garrett S  ; Whitelock H  ; Kennedy LG  ; O'Hea J  ; Mallorie P
    ; Jenkinson T
TI: A   new   approach   to   defining   functional  ability in ankylosing
    spondylitis:   the   development   of  the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis
    Functional Index.
AD: Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK.
AB: OBJECTIVE.  After  pain  and  stiffness,  one  of  the  most important
    complaints   of   patients   with   ankylosing   spondylitis   (AS) is
    disability.  The  main  aims of treatment are to control pain but also
    to  improve  function. Various methods of assessing function exist but
    are  either  not  specific for the disease or have not been adequately
    validated.  As  a  result  of  this  deficiency  we developed the Bath
    Ankylosing  Spondylitis  Functional Index (BASFI) as a new approach to
    defining  and  monitoring  functional  ability  in  patients  with AS.
    METHODS.  This  self-assessment  instrument  was designed by a team of
    medical  professionals in conjunction with patients, and consists of 8
    specific   questions   regarding   function   in   AS  and 2 questions
    reflecting  the  patient's  ability  to  cope with everyday life. Each
    question  is  answered  on a 10 cm horizontal visual analog scale, the
    mean  of  which  gives  the  BASFI score (0-10). The questionnaire was
    completed  257  times  in  total:  once  by  116 outpatients and by 47
    inpatients  on  3  occasions  over  a  3-week  intensive physiotherapy
    course.  In  addition,  the  instrument was compared with the Dougados
    functional  index.  RESULTS.  Patients scores covered 95% of the BASFI
    range,  giving  a normal distribution of results. In contrast only 65%
    of  the  Dougados  functional  index scale was used. Furthermore, over
    the  3  week  period  of  inpatient  treatment,  the  BASFI revealed a
    significant  improvement  in function (20%, p = 0.004) while there was
    a  less  impressive  change  in the Dougados functional index (6%, p =
    0.03) .  This  demonstrates  the  superior  sensitivity  of the BASFI.
    Consistency  was  good  for  both  indices  (p  <  0.001) , as was the
    relationship  between  patient  perception of function and function as
    assessed  by  an  external observer (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION. The BASFI
    satisfies  the  criteria  required  of a functional index: it is quick
    and  easy  to  complete, is reliable and is sensitive to change across
    the whole spectrum of disease.
 
SO: J Rheumatol 1994 Dec;21 (12):2281-5
                                                  DOCUMENT: 27 of 78
 
UI: 95215929
AU: Benoist M
PS: Marie P
TI: Pierre Marie. Pioneer investigator in ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Rheumatology Unit, H^opital Bichat, Paris, France.
 
SO: Spine 1995 Apr 1;20 (7):849-52
                                                  DOCUMENT: 28 of 78
 
UI: 95216974
AU: Maksymowych WP; Chou CT  ; Russell AS
TI: Matching   prevalence   of   peripheral   arthritis and acute anterior
    uveitis in individuals with ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Division of Rheumatology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
AB: OBJECTIVE--To   study   the   association   between  the occurrence of
    peripheral  arthritis  and of acute anterior uveitis during the course
    of   ankylosing   spondylitis   (AS) . METHODS--Retrospective clinical
    follow  up  by  both  chart  review  and  direct patient interview was
    performed  on  271  individuals  comprised  of  222 local white and 49
    Taiwanese  individuals  with  AS.  RESULTS--Of  89 white patients with
    acute  anterior  uveitis,  36  (40.4%)  also had peripheral arthritis,
    compared  with  only  33 (24.8%) having peripheral arthritis among the
    133  who  did not have acute anterior uveitis (p < 0.02). Thirty seven
    (78.7%)  of  49 Taiwanese individuals with AS had peripheral arthritis
    and  these  included  all 10 patients with acute anterior uveitis from
    the   entire   disease   cohort   (p   <   0.05)  .  CONCLUSIONS--This
    cross-sectional  survey of AS patients supports the view that patients
    who  develop  peripheral  arthritis  are  also  more likely to develop
    acute anterior uveitis.
 
SO: Ann Rheum Dis 1995 Feb;54 (2):128-30
                                                  DOCUMENT: 29 of 78
 
UI: 95219312
AU: Cury SE; Ferraz MB  ; dos Santos JQ  ; Miranda C  ; Redko C  ; Vilar MJ  ;
    Atra E
TI: The  use  of  focus group interview in the evaluation of patients with
    ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Division  of  Rheumatology,  Escola  Paulista de Medicina, S~ao Paulo,
    Brazil.
AB: The  purpose  of  this  study  was  to develop some of the focus group
    discussion  (FGD)  potentialities  in  order to provide information on
    patients'  understanding of the origin and management of their medical
    condition.  Fifteen  ankylosing  spondylitis (AS) patients (mean age =
    32.6  yr  and  mean disease duration = 13.4 yr) were selected from the
    Rheumatic  Disease Unit (RDU) out-patient clinic at Escola Paulista de
    Medicina,  S~ao  Paulo,  Brazil,  to  take part in this study. The FGD
    constituted  two  sessions, with eight patients in the first and seven
    in  the  second.  The  moderator  raised  specific questions about the
    patients'  understanding  of  the pathology, the treatment and how the
    illness  affected  their  quality of life. It was observed through the
    FGD  that  patients  believed that their illness onset was due to some
    physical  trauma.  Clinicians  should  inquire about this tissue to be
    sure  that  their  individual  patients do not have this false belief.
    Also,  it  is necessary to improve the methods for early diagnosis and
    to  develop  further studies to determine and assess the parameters of
    disease  activity.  And  finally,  FGD may be of use in establishing a
    self-help  group for individuals with chronic diseases, such as AS. In
    conclusion  the FGD is an available technique that should be used more
    frequently in medicine to gather global qualitative data.
 
SO: Br J Rheumatol 1995 Feb;34 (2):150-5
                                                  DOCUMENT: 30 of 78
 
UI: 95227967
AU: Hsu CM; Kuo SY  ; Chu SJ  ; Shih TY  ; Chen A  ; Huang GS  ; Chang DM
TI: Coexisting  IgA  nephropathy and leukocytoclastic cutaneous vasculitis
    associated with ankylosing spondylitis: a case report.
AD: Department   of   Internal   Medicine,   Tri-Service General Hospital,
    National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C.
AB: A  patient  with ankylosing spondylitis and coexisting IgA nephropathy
    and  leukocytoclastic  cutaneous vasculitis is described. Renal biopsy
    demonstrated    mesangial    proliferative    glomerulonephritis  with
    prominent   IgA,   C3   and   fibrin   deposition   in  the glomeruli.
    Simultaneously,  leukocytoclastic  cutaneous vasculitis with prominent
    IgG,  IgA and C3 deposition of dermal vessel wall was also observed in
    the  skin  biopsy  specimen.  Such  associations  have been previously
    reported  in  only  four  cases. This report once again indicates that
    antigenic  mucosal  stimulation  may  play  an  important  role in the
    pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis.
 
SO: Chung Hua I Hsueh Tsa Chih (Taipei) 1995 Jan;55 (1):83-8
                                                  DOCUMENT: 31 of 78
 
UI: 95234068
AU: Braun J; Bollow M  ; Neure L  ; Seipelt E  ; Seyrekbasan F  ; Herbst H  ;
    Eggens U  ; Distler A  ; Sieper J
TI: Use  of  immunohistologic  and in situ hybridization techniques in the
    examination  of  sacroiliac  joint biopsy specimens from patients with
    ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Klinikum Benjamin Franklin, Freie Universit at Berlin, Germany.
AB: OBJECTIVE.  To investigate mechanisms involved in inflammation and new
    bone   formation   in   the   sacroiliac  (SI) joints of patients with
    ankylosing   spondylitis   (AS)  .   PATIENTS   AND  METHODS. Computed
    tomography-assisted   biopsy   of   the   SI  joint was performed in 5
    patients  with  AS  with  a  mean  disease  duration  of 4.5 years and
    radiographic   stage   2-3   disease.   Immunohistologic  studies were
    performed   with   the  alkaline phosphatase-anti-alkaline phosphatase
    technique,  and  cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA) was detected by in situ
    hybridization.   RESULTS.   Dense   cellular  infiltrates with varying
    amounts  of  CD3+ cells (mean +/- SD 53.3 +/- 24.1%), CD4+ cells (29.7
    +/ - 17.6%), CD8+ cells (15.8 +/- 11.4%), CD14+ cells (23.6 +/- 16.9%)
    ,CD45RO+  cells  (48.4  +/ -  23.6%), and CD45RA+ cells (4.5 +/- 2.9%)
    were  found  in  the  synovial  portion  of  the  SI  joints  of all 5
    patients.  In these infiltrates a high amount of tumor necrosis factor
    alpha  (TNF  alpha)  mRNA  and, near the site of new bone formation, a
    lower  amount of transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) mRNA, were
    detected,  while  no  message  for  interleukin-1  was  found in the 3
    patients  examined  by  this  technique. CONCLUSION. The presence of T
    cells  and macrophages was demonstrated in cellular infiltrates in the
    SI  joints  of  5 patients with active AS. The finding of abundant TNF
    alpha  message  in  these  joints  could  have  implications regarding
    potential  immunotherapeutic  approaches  to  this  disease.  TGF beta
    might be involved in new bone formation in AS.
 
SO: Arthritis Rheum 1995 Apr;38 (4):499-505
                                                  DOCUMENT: 32 of 78
 
UI: 95234074
AU: Monowarul Islam SM; Numaga J  ; Fujino Y  ; Masuda K  ; Ohda H  ; Hirata R
    ; Maeda H  ; Mitsui H
TI: HLA-DR8 and acute anterior uveitis in ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Japan.
AB: OBJECTIVE.  To  identify  possible factors in the development of acute
    anterior  uveitis  (AUU) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS).
    METHODS.  We  investigated HLA antigens serologically, and HLA-DRB1*08
    alleles   by   polymerase   chain reaction-restriction fragment length
    polymorphism,  in  42  Japanese  AS  patients  with  and  without AAU.
    RESULTS.  Thirty-six  of the AS patients (85.7%) had HLA-B27. Thirteen
    (65%)  of  the 20 patients with AAU had HLA-DR8, whereas only 1 (4.5%)
    of   the   22   patients   without   AAU   had DR8. The difference was
    statistically  significant  (Pcorr  <  0.001) .  CONCLUSION.  Our data
    suggest  that  HLA-B27  is  strongly  associated  with  AS in Japanese
    patients  and  that HLA-DR8 is important for the development of AAU in
    Japanese patients with AS.
 
SO: Arthritis Rheum 1995 Apr;38 (4):547-50
                                                  DOCUMENT: 33 of 78
 
UI: 95243680
AU: Salvemini JN; Cande FP  ; Lynfield Y  ; Baldwin H
TI: Multiple   erythematous   papules   on   the   back  of a patient with
    ankylosing   spondylitis.   Multiple   basal   cell  carcinomas (BCCs)
    secondary to radiation exposure.
AD: Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA.
 
SO: Arch Dermatol 1995 Apr;131 (4):485, 488
                                                  DOCUMENT: 34 of 78
 
UI: 95245514
AU: Cohen AM; Coates DP
TI: Fractured  hip  in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis and pulmonary
    fibrosis.
AD: Department of Anaesthesia, Royal Brompton Hospital, London.
 
SO: Br J Hosp Med 1995 Feb 1-14;53 (3):119
                                                  DOCUMENT: 35 of 78
 
UI: 95249750
AU: Amor B; Dougados M  ; Khan MA
TI: Management   of   refractory   ankylosing   spondylitis   and  related
    spondyloarthropathies.
AD: Universit e Ren e Descartes, H^opital Cochin, Paris, France.
AB: Ankylosing  spondylitis  is  the prototype of an interrelated group of
    disorders   termed   spondyloarthropathies,   which   include reactive
    arthritis,  psoriatic  arthritis,  and  rheumatic disorders associated
    with  inflammatory bowel disease. It can be difficult to differentiate
    between  these  disorders  because  they  may  occur simultaneously or
    sequentially.  In  addition,  some  of the clinical characteristics of
    these   diseases,   such   as   enthesiopathy and eye involvement, are
    similar  no  matter what the diagnosis. The monitoring, diagnosis, and
    treatment  of  these  diseases  are  related  more  to  their clinical
    presentation than to the precise diagnosis.
RF: 52
SO: Rheum Dis Clin North Am 1995 Feb;21 (1):117-28
                                                  DOCUMENT: 36 of 78
 
UI: 95257319
AU: Koeger AC; Karmochkine M  ; Cha ibi P
TI: RS3PE   syndrome   associated   with   advanced ankylosing spondylitis
    [letter]
 
SO: J Rheumatol 1995 Feb;22 (2):375-6
                                                  DOCUMENT: 37 of 78
 
UI: 96085198
AU: D'Amato M; Fiorillo MT  ; Carcassi C  ; Mathieu A  ; Zuccarelli A  ; Bitti
    PP  ; Tosi R  ; Sorrentino R
TI: Relevance  of  residue 116 of HLA-B27 in determining susceptibility to
    ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Department  of  Cell  Biology  and  Development, University of Rome La
    Sapienza, Italy.
AB: Ankylosing   spondylitis   (AS)   is   an autoimmune disorder strongly
    associated  with  HLA-B27.  A  direct  role  of  B27  molecules in the
    disease  pathogenesis has been postulated, possibly by presenting to T
    cells  an  as-yet unidentified arthritogenic peptide that triggers the
    autoimmune  response.  There  are  nine HLA-B27 alleles differing from
    each  other  at one or more amino acid positions. It is important, for
    the  identification  of  the  arthritogenic  peptide,  to define which
    alleles,  and therefore which polymorphic positions, predispose to the
    disease.  Here,  we  report that HLA-B*2709 is not associated with AS,
    as  it  was  not  found  in patients. HLA-B*2709 differs from the most
    frequent   and   disease-associated   HLA-B*  2705 allele for a single
    substitution  (His vs. Asp) at position 116. Amino acid 116 is located
    at  the  bottom of the groove where the antigenic peptide sits, and it
    has  been  proven  to influence the peptide-binding specificity of HLA
    class  I  molecules.  The  most likely interpretation of these data is
    that  the differences in charge and size that accompany the His-to-Asp
    substitution exclude the acceptance of the arthritogenic peptide.
 
SO: Eur J Immunol 1995 Nov;25 (11):3199-201
                                                  DOCUMENT: 38 of 78
 
UI: 96064229
AU: Shih LY; Chen TH  ; Lo WH  ; Yang DJ
TI: Total   hip   arthroplasty   in  patients with ankylosing spondylitis:
    longterm followup.
AD: Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Veterans General Hospital,
    Taipei, Taiwan.
AB: OBJECTIVE.  To  evaluate  the longterm functional effects of total hip
    arthroplasty  (THA) on 46 patients. METHODS. Clinical and radiographic
    examinations  were  performed  on 46 patients (74 THA) with ankylosing
    spondylitis  (AS) .  The  mean  followup  period was 100 months (range
    37-174  months) ; 32  hips  were  followed  for  more  than  10 years.
    RESULTS.  Significant benefit was obtained in pain control (all but 2)
    and  function (mean improvement in range of motion 128 degrees) in the
    early  stage  so that patients could be gainfully employed. An average
    100  months  after  THA,  the  overall  functional  results were rated
    excellent  in  21  hips, good in 28, fair in 7, and poor in 18. Only 6
    hips  (8%)  in  our series developed clinically significant (Class III
    or   IV)   heterotopic   ossification.   Seventeen   hips needed a 2nd
    operation   because   of   loosening   (11   hips), deep infection (3)
    ,malposition  of acetabular component (2), and prosthetic failure (1).
    Another  6 hips showed definite loosening on radiographs and needed to
    be  revised.  The  total  incidence  of failure was 31% (23 hips). The
    average  time  from  the  index  operation  to loosening was 9.5 years
    (range  4-13  years). Factors contributing to component loosening were
    young   age,   short   stature,   and decreased postoperative range of
    motion.  CONCLUSION.  Total hip arthroplasty can be very important and
    beneficial  to  patients  with  AS,  but the patients, being young and
    active,  and  with  their  rigid spines, do not treat their prostheses
    gently  and  are very dependent upon their mobility. They must be kept
    under  supervision  long  after  THA,  probably  for the rest of their
    lives, to identify possible longterm complications.
 
SO: J Rheumatol 1995 Sep;22 (9):1704-9
                                                  DOCUMENT: 39 of 78
 
UI: 96056006
AU: Halm H; Metz-Stavenhagen P  ; Zielke K
TI: Results  of  surgical  correction of kyphotic deformities of the spine
    in  ankylosing  spondylitis  on  the  basis  of the modified arthritis
    impact measurement scales.
AD: Center     of     Spine     Surgery,     German     Scoliosis  Center,
    Werner-Wicker-Clinic, Bad Wildungen-Reinhardshausen.
AB: STUDY  DESIGN.  This  is  a  retrospective study of patient outcome in
    ankylosing  spondylitis  patients  with  fixed kyphotic deformities of
    the   spine   who   underwent   reconstructive surgery. OBJECTIVES. To
    measure   the   multidimensional   effects   of  reconstructive spinal
    osteotomy   in   this   patient   group   with   a questionnaire-based
    instrument.  SUMMARY  OF  BACKGROUND  DATA. Between 1979 and 1988, 175
    ankylosing  spondylitis  patients  underwent  operative  treatment for
    fixed  flexion  deformities  of  the spine. One hundred forty-eight of
    these  patients answered the questionnaire correctly and were included
    in  the  study.  The  others  either  died  or were lost to follow-up.
    METHODS.  The  modified Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales with eight
    scales  and  60  items  plus  six  additional summative questions were
    administered  at  a  mean  follow-up  period of 4.8 years (range, 2-10
    years) .  The  modified  Arthritis  Impact  Measurement Scale measures
    eight  scales--mobility,  physical, household, daily, social activity,
    pain,  anxiety,  and depression. The Wilcoxon and chi-square test were
    used   for   analysis.   RESULTS.   Forty-seven   of   60 items showed
    significant  improvement  of activity levels or status. Only two items
    showed  a  significant  impairment of function. Of the patients, 88.4%
    were  very satisfied with the result of the operation; 60.9% were able
    to  return  to  work. Age, sex, and type of surgical technique did not
    influence  the  results.  CONCLUSIONS.  The  modified Arthritis Impact
    Measurement  Scales  approach  shows  excellent overall improvement of
    health  status  after  surgery,  proving  the  worth of reconstructive
    surgery   in   ankylosing   spondylitis   patients with fixed kyphotic
    deformities of the spine.
 
SO: Spine 1995 Jul 15;20 (14):1612-9
                                                  DOCUMENT: 40 of 78
 
UI: 96040552
AU: Komatsubara Y
TI: [Ankylosing spondylitis (editorial)]
 
SO: Ryumachi 1995 Jun;35 (3):503-4
                                                  DOCUMENT: 41 of 78
 
UI: 96021956
AU: Karasick D; Schweitzer ME  ; Abidi NA  ; Cotler JM
TI: Fractures  of the vertebrae with spinal cord injuries in patients with
    ankylosing spondylitis: imaging findings.
AD: Department   of   Radiology,   Thomas   Jefferson University Hospital,
    Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA.
AB: Ankylosing  spondylitis is a systemic rheumatologic disorder of adults
    that    results    in    disease-specific    inflammation and eventual
    ossification  at  the  site  of  ligamentous  insertion into bone. The
    resulting   spinal   ankylosis   causes biomechanical alterations that
    predispose  the  patient to serious spinal injury even in the presence
    of  minor  trauma.  With  the loss of spinal flexibility and increased
    bone   fragility,   there   is   a  propensity for vertebral fracture,
    instability,   and   increased  neurologic complications. Illustrative
    examples  of  the imaging modalities are presented, as they contribute
    to  the  detection  of  fractures and spinal cord injuries in patients
    with ankylosing spondylitis.
 
SO: AJR Am J Roentgenol 1995 Nov;165 (5):1205-8
                                                  DOCUMENT: 42 of 78
 
UI: 96016059
AU: Hermann E; Suck e B  ; Droste U  ; Meyer zum B uschenfelde KH
TI: Klebsiella  pneumoniae-reactive T cells in blood and synovial fluid of
    patients   with   ankylosing   spondylitis.   Comparison with HLA-B27+
    healthy   control   subjects   in   a   limiting   dilution  study and
    determination of the specificity of synovial fluid T cell clones.
AD: Johannes-Gutenberg-University, Mainz, Germany.
AB: OBJECTIVE.  To study the frequency of Klebsiella pneumoniae-responsive
    T  cells  in  the peripheral blood (PB) of ankylosing spondylitis (AS)
    patients  compared  with  that  in  healthy  HLA-B27+  donors,  and to
    examine  T  lymphocyte  clones  (TLC) derived from AS patient synovial
    fluid   (SF)   for   the   presence of Klebsiella reactivity. METHODS.
    Limiting  dilution analysis of PB T cells in 8 patients with active AS
    and   in   8   HLA-B27+   healthy   subjects was used to determine the
    frequency  of  PB  T  cells responsive to K pneumoniae and Escherichia
    coli  GroEL. SF T cells from a patient with active AS were cloned, and
    125  TLC  were  characterized  in proliferation assays. RESULTS. There
    were  fewer  T  cells  in  the  PB  of AS patients that reacted with K
    pneumoniae   than   in   the   PB   of  healthy HLA-B27+ subjects. The
    frequencies  of  E  coli  GroEL-responsive  T cells were approximately
    5-10  times  lower  in  all  subjects  tested  (healthy  donors and AS
    patients) , but  without significant differences between the 2 groups.
    Two  CD4+  TLC  that  recognized K pneumoniae (1 cross-reactive with E
    coli)  as  well  as  3  TLC  that  recognized  GroEL (2 CD4+, 1 T cell
    receptor  gamma/ delta+)  were  isolated from the SF of a patient with
    actige   AS.   CONCLUSION.   Our   results   indicate  that there is a
    quantitative  reduction  of  K pneumoniae-responsive T cells in the PB
    of  AS  patients as compared with healthy controls. This may reflect a
    defective   peripheral   T   cell   defense  in the immune response to
    Klebsiella  and  may  allow  bacterial antigens to reach the synovium,
    where they initiate specific T cell responses.
 
SO: Arthritis Rheum 1995 Sep;38 (9):1277-82
                                                  DOCUMENT: 43 of 78
 
UI: 95368973
AU: Hidding A; van der Linden S
TI: Factors  related  to  change  in  global  health  after group physical
    therapy in ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Department  of  Internal  Medicine, University of Limburg, Maastricht,
    The Netherlands.
AB: The  purpose  of this study was to evaluate how improvements in global
    health  in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), who had received
    group  physical  therapy,  were  associated  with  changes in physical
    functioning  and  other outcome measures. Sixty-seven AS patients from
    2  outpatient  departments (modified New York criteria) received group
    physical  therapy  weekly.  After  9  months  we studied the following
    variables  to  explain  changes  in  global  health: disease duration,
    spinal  mobility,  fitness, functional status (SIP, HAQ and Functional
    Index) , pain,  stiffness,  and articular and enthesis indices. Change
    scores  were  calculated  as  baseline  values minus scores at 9-month
    follow-up.   Personality   traits   (neuroticism,   social inadequacy,
    self-esteem  and  health  locus  of  control) and loneliness were also
    included  as  possibly  explanatory variables. Patient's assessment of
    change  in  global health after 9 months of group physical therapy was
    self-reported   on   a   10   cm   visual analogue scale (-5 = maximum
    worsening,  0  =  no  change,  +5 = maximum improvement). Correlations
    were  calculated  between  change  in  global health and all candidate
    explanatory  variables.  In  this  pre/ post  test design multiple and
    stepwise  regression  analyses  were  performed to study the relations
    between  changes  in  global  health  and  all  explanatory variables.
    Pearson  correlation  coefficients  between improved global health and
    the  explanatory  variables  were  significant  for  lower self-esteem
    (0.27)  and  improvements  in  chest  expansion (0.31), fitness (0.32)
    ,HAQ-S  (0.29) , and  stiffness (0.33). Regression analysis revealed 2
    significantly  explanatory  steps: changes in fitness explained 16% of
    total  variance  of changes in global health, and changes in stiffness
    contributed an additional 11%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
 
SO: Clin Rheumatol 1995 May;14 (3):347-51
                                                  DOCUMENT: 44 of 78
 
UI: 95368975
AU: Kabasakal Y; Kiyici I  ; Ozmen D  ; Yagci A  ; Gumusdis G
TI: Spinal   abnormalities   similar   to   ankylosing   spondylitis  in a
    58-year-old woman with ochronosis.
AD: Department  of  Rheumatology,  Ege  University  Medical School, Izmir,
    Turkey.
AB: Ochronotic  arthropathy  (spondylosis  or peripheral arthropathy) is a
    late  complication  of  alkaptonuria.  There is a tendency for HLA-B27
    positive    patients    with    alkaptonuria    to  develop ochronotic
    spondylosis.  A  58-year-old  white  woman,  presented with ochronotic
    spondylosis.   She   was   HLA-B27   positive.  Her family history was
    positive   for   alkaptonuria.   Ochronotic   patients   with  HLA-B27
    positivity  develop  spinal  changes similar to ankylosing spondylitis
    (AS).
 
SO: Clin Rheumatol 1995 May;14 (3):355-7
                                                  DOCUMENT: 45 of 78
 
UI: 95377410
AU: Fielder M; Pirt SJ  ; Tarpey I  ; Wilson C  ; Cunningham P  ; Ettelaie C
    ; Binder A  ; Bansal S  ; Ebringer A
TI: Molecular  mimicry  and  ankylosing  spondylitis:  possible  role of a
    novel sequence in pullulanase of Klebsiella pneumoniae.
AD: Division of Life Sciences, King's College, London, UK.
AB: Molecular  mimicry  has been shown between two sequences of Klebsiella
    pneumoniae  pulD secretion protein (DRDE) with HLA-B27 (DRED) and pulA
    (pullulanase)  enzyme  (Gly-X-Pro)  with  types I, III and IV collagen
    respectively.   IgG   antibody   levels   in AS patients were elevated
    against  16mer  synthetic  peptides  of  HLA-B27  and  pulD  by enzyme
    immunosorbent  assay  (ELISA)  compared to controls (P < 0.001). ELISA
    assays  against  K.  pneumoniae  grown  in the absence and presence of
    pullulan   demonstrated   significant   levels   of IgA antibody in AS
    patients  compared  to  controls  (P  <  0.001). Increased IgA and IgG
    antibody  levels  to pulA and types I and IV collagen were observed in
    AS  patients  compared  to  controls  (P  < 0.001). These observations
    could be relevant in the sequence of molecular events in AS.
 
SO: FEBS Lett 1995 Aug 7;369 (2-3):243-8
                                                  DOCUMENT: 46 of 78
 
UI: 95381234
AU: Maksymowych WP; Tao S  ; Li Y  ; Wing M  ; Russell AS
TI: Allelic  variation  at the TAP 1 locus influences disease phenotype in
    HLA-B27 positive individuals with ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
AB: The  objective  was  to  determine  the  role  of  the  TAP  1 gene in
    influencing   the   phenotype   of   disease   in  adult patients with
    ankylosing  spondylitis  (AS) . The distribution of TAP 1 gene alleles
    was  determined  using the PCR RFLP method and restriction enzymes Bcl
    I  and  Acc  I.  The  study  population  included 115 HLA-B27 positive
    patients  with  well-documented  AS  and  41  HLA-B27  positive normal
    controls.  No  significant difference in distribution of TAP 1 alleles
    was  noted  in  comparisons  of  all AS patients with normal controls.
    However,  AS  patients  with  extraspinal disease were noted to have a
    significantly  increased  prevalence  of  the TAP 1B allele (17.0%) as
    compared to AS patients without extraspinal disease (2.9%) (P = 0.005)
    or  normal  controls  (1.9%)  (P  =  0.005). Polymorphism at the TAP 1
    locus may influence disease outcome in patients with AS.
 
SO: Tissue Antigens 1995 May;45 (5):328-32
                                                  DOCUMENT: 47 of 78
 
UI: 95385112
AU: van der Linden S; van der Heijde DM
TI: Ankylosing spondylitis and other B27 related spondylarthropathies.
AD: Department  of  Internal  Medicine, University Hospital of Maastricht,
    The Netherlands.
AB: Classification  of  ankylosing spondylitis and spondylarthropathies is
    now   satisfactory,   but   assessment   of ankylosing spondylitis and
    related  disorders  could be improved. Currently, we do not completely
    encompass  the  spectrum  of  relevant outcomes. Functional status and
    toxicity  assessment  are  frequently lacking. Although a considerable
    amount  of  progress  has  been  made  over  the  past  decade  in the
    development  of patient status measures, this has mainly been achieved
    in   rheumatic   diseases   that   are   characterized  by predominant
    involvement  of  peripheral joints. This achievement is less prominent
    in  ankylosing  spondylitis.  It  may  be  relatively  easy  to define
    activity  of extra-articular manifestations such as uveitis, but it is
    more  difficult  to define activity, severity, progress and outcome of
    a   disease   like   ankylosing   spondylitis  with predominant spinal
    involvement.
RF: 50
SO: Baillieres Clin Rheumatol 1995 May;9 (2):355-73
                                                  DOCUMENT: 48 of 78
 
UI: 95389257
AU: Singh A; Bronson W  ; Walker SE  ; Allen SH
TI: Relative  value of femoral and lumbar bone mineral density assessments
    in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Department   of   Radiology,   University  of Missouri Health Sciences
    Center, Columbia, USA.
AB: The  objective  of  this study was to examine the relative sensitivity
    of  femoral  and  lumbar  bone  mineral  density (BMD) measurements in
    patients  with  ankylosing  spondylitis  (AS) and to identify the most
    appropriate  test  site for detection of osteopenia in these patients.
    Fourteen  patients  with ankylosing spondylitis had femoral and lumbar
    bone  mineral  density studies using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry.
    Significant  osteopenia  was found in 93% of patients when the femoral
    hip  was  examined  and  in 29% of patients when the lumbar region was
    examined.  Moreover,  femoral  measurements exhibited greater severity
    of  osteopenia  than  lumbar  measurements when average T and Z scores
    were  compared.  Bone  loss was most marked at Ward's triangle and the
    neck  of  the  femur. When the lumbar measurements are insensitive and
    inappropriate,  femoral  neck and Ward's triangle measurements provide
    a  more reliable indication of the presence and severity of osteopenia
    in  patients  with  AS.  Interpretation  of  BMD at the trochanter and
    intertrochanter,  as  well  as  total  hip  BMD, yielded no additional
    information in the diagnosis of osteopenia.
 
SO: South Med J 1995 Sep;88 (9):939-43
                                                  DOCUMENT: 49 of 78
 
UI: 95398481
AU: Archer JR
TI: Ankylosing spondylitis, IgA, and transforming growth factors.
AD: Bone  &  Joint  Research Unit, London Hospital Medical College, United
    Kingdom.
RF: 36
SO: Ann Rheum Dis 1995 Jul;54 (7):544-6
                                                  DOCUMENT: 50 of 78
 
UI: 95398483
AU: Marhoffer W; Stracke H  ; Masoud I  ; Scheja M  ; Graef V  ; Bolten W  ;
    Federlin K
TI: Evidence  of  impaired cartilage/bone turnover in patients with active
    ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Clinic of Rheumatology Wiesbaden II, University of Giessen, Germany.
AB: OBJECTIVES--To  compare  serum  markers  of  bone  formation  with the
    urinary   excretion   of   pyridinium   crosslinks (PYR) as a possible
    measure  of  bone and cartilage degradation which would detect changes
    in  bone  metabolism  in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and
    to  relate them to influences of inflammatory disease activity, and to
    treatment.   METHODS--In   62   patients   with AS, serum osteocalcin,
    alkaline  phosphatase  (ALP) , and  skeletal ALP isoenzyme levels were
    evaluated   concurrently   in   comparison   with urinary excretion of
    pyridinium  cross  links  and  were compared with values in 50 healthy
    controls.  RESULTS--Osteocalcin  concentrations in AS patients were in
    the  middle  normal  range  (3.5  (SD  1.2)  ng/ml) and did not differ
    significantly  from  those  in control subjects (4.2 (1.3) ng/ml); the
    same  was  true  for  ALP and skeletal ALP isoenzyme fraction (AS: ALP
    149  (50.3)  U/ l, skeletal ALP 12.8 (4.1) micrograms/l; controls: ALP
    133  (25.2)  U/ l,  skeletal ALP 11.9 (4.3) micrograms/l). The urinary
    levels  of  PYR  in  AS  (51.2  (25.2)  nmol PYR/mmol creatinine) were
    significantly  increased compared with controls (33.9 (12.4) nmol PYR/
    mmol  creatinine  (p  <  0.001)). In the AS group there was a positive
    correlation  between urinary excretion of PYR and inflammatory disease
    activity  (erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR)) (r = 0.6, p < 0.0001)
    and  C  reactive protein (CRP) (r = 0.3, p = 0.02), but no significant
    correlation  was  found  with ESR, CRP, and markers of bone formation.
    CONCLUSIONS--Bone  metabolism  in patients with AS is characterised by
    normal   bone   formation   and   enhanced cartilage/bone degradation,
    suggesting   that   impaired   bone   turnover is pronounced in active
    disease.  The  results  clearly  indicate  that this comparison can be
    used  to  demonstrate  impairment  of  cartilage/bone metabolism which
    correlates  with disease activity. The data obtained further emphasise
    the   importance   of   measuring   both   serum variables and urinary
    excretion   of   PYR   crosslinks   to   obtain adequate evaluation of
    cartilage/bone metabolism in patients with AS.
 
SO: Ann Rheum Dis 1995 Jul;54 (7):556-9
                                                  DOCUMENT: 51 of 78
 
UI: 95400659
AU: Calin A
TI: The  individual  with  ankylosing spondylitis: defining disease status
    and the impact of the illness.
AD: Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath.
RF: 49
SO: Br J Rheumatol 1995 Jul;34 (7):663-72
                                                  DOCUMENT: 52 of 78
 
UI: 95400672
AU: Koh WH; Dunphy J  ; Dixey J  ; Calin A  ; McHugh NJ  ; Maddison PJ
TI: Atypical   antineutrophil   cytoplasmic   antibodies  in patients with
    ankylosing spondylitis [letter]
 
SO: Br J Rheumatol 1995 Jul;34 (7):695-6
                                                  DOCUMENT: 53 of 78
 
UI: 95404547
AU: Creemers MC; Franssen MJ  ; van de Putte LB  ; Gribnau FW  ; van Riel PL
TI: Methotrexate in severe ankylosing spondylitis: an open study.
AD: Department  of  Rheumatology, St. Radbound Academic Hospital Nijmegen,
    The Netherlands.
AB: OBJECTIVE.  To  study  the efficacy and toxicity of methotrexate (MTX)
    for  patients  with  ankylosing  spondylitis  (AS) in a 36 week, open,
    single  observer  study.  METHODS. Patients were selected for study if
    they  had  evidence  of  active  disease  and had failed to respond to
    treatment   with   nonsteroidal   antiinflammatory   drugs (NSAID) and
    sulfasalazine.   Eleven   patients   entered   the   study, and 9 were
    evaluated  at  the  end.  Oral MTX (7.5-15 mg weekly) was given for at
    least  24  weeks;  NSAID  were  kept  at  a  stable dose. Efficacy was
    evaluated  by calculating the relative difference of assessed variable
    between  Week  0  and  24 and by patient evaluation. RESULTS. Assessed
    variables  showed  good relative improvement. Four patients decided to
    continue  MTX;  3  used a lower dose of NSAID; one stopped NSAID. Five
    patient  patients  discontinued MTX: 3 of these had disease flares and
    restarted  MTX.  Side  effects  were  mild and reversible. CONCLUSION.
    Results  of our study showed that the majority of our patients with AS
    taking MTX had beneficial effects.
 
SO: J Rheumatol 1995 Jun;22 (6):1104-7
                                                  DOCUMENT: 54 of 78
 
UI: 96070327
AU: Viitanen JV; Lehtinen K  ; Suni J  ; Kautiainen H
TI: Fifteen  months'  follow-up  of  intensive inpatient physiotherapy and
    exercise in ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Rehabilitation Institute of the Finnish Rheumatism Association.
AB: Long-term  effects  of  three or four-week inpatient physiotherapy and
    exercise  courses  were  studied in 141 adult patients with ankylosing
    spondylitis  (AS) .  Eight  cervical and thoracolumbar range of motion
    (ROM)  measurements  and  straight leg raise test, vital capacity (VC)
    and  fitness  index  were  measured  at  the  beginning  and end of an
    intensive  course and 15 months later. All nine mobility measurements,
    vital  capacity  and  fitness  index were significantly improved after
    the  course.  Fifteen  months  later  only  chest  expansion and vital
    capacity  had  significantly deteriorated from the baseline, while CR,
    FFD   and   fitness   index   were still significantly better. Disease
    duration  did  not influence treatment results. We conclude that it is
    possible  by  means of intensive rehabilitation courses to prevent for
    more  than one year deterioration of spinal function and fitness in AS
    patients irrespective of disease duration.
 
SO: Clin Rheumatol 1995 Jul;14 (4):413-9
                                                  DOCUMENT: 55 of 78
 
UI: 96003063
AU: James WH
TI: Sex ratio in ankylosing spondylitis [letter]
 
SO: J Rheumatol 1995 Aug;22 (8):1607
                                                  DOCUMENT: 56 of 78
 
UI: 96003065
AU: Jones SD; Porter J  ; Garrett SL  ; Kennedy LG  ; Whitelock H  ; Calin A
TI: A  new  scoring  system  for the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology
    Index (BASMI) [letter]
 
SO: J Rheumatol 1995 Aug;22 (8):1609
                                                  DOCUMENT: 57 of 78
 
UI: 96048173
AU: Tanaka H; Itoh E  ; Shibusa T  ; Chiba H  ; Hirasawa M  ; Abe S
TI: Pleural  effusion in ankylosing spondylitis; successful treatment with
    intra-pleural steroid administration.
AD: Third  Department  of  Internal  Medicine,  Sapporo Medical University
    School of Medicine, Japan.
 
SO: Respir Med 1995 Aug;89 (7):509-11
                                                  DOCUMENT: 58 of 78
 
UI: 96075173
AU: Be na cka J; M ali s F  ; Zlnay D
TI: [Cardiac  impairment  detected  by  echocardiography  in patients with
    ankylosing spondylitis]
AD: Intern e oddelenie NsP, Pie st'any.
AB: The  authors  subjected  to  complete echocardiographic examination 40
    patients   with   ankylosing   spondylitis   (AS)   in order to assess
    pathological  changes  of  the  heart  (changes  of  the structure and
    function  of valves, myocardial function of the left ventricle and the
    pericardium)    and    compare    their    incidence    with  clinical
    characteristics  of  the  patients  (age,  duration,  stage,  form and
    activity  of the disease) as well as with the presence of ECG changes.
    Based  on  the  results  and  their statistical analysis they revealed
    that  structural  changes  of the aorta and its valves associated with
    dilatation  of  the  root of the aorta, its mild insufficiency and the
    possible  finding  of a typical bump on its posterior wall is found in
    half  the  patients  with  AS,  being  more  frequent when the disease
    develops  early, when it persists for a long time or is in an advanced
    stage.  A  similar  relationship is found also in the presence of mild
    diastolic  dysfunction  of  the  left  ventricle.  The authors did not
    observe  a  more  frequent  incidence of other pathological changes of
    the  heart  in  patients  with  AS.  None of the detected changes were
    clinically  severe and did not call for aimed treatment or surgery. In
    the  conclusion  the  authors  compare the assessed facts with data in
    the literature and confront data in the literature.
 
SO: Vnitr Lek 1995 Sep;41 (9):613-7
                                                  DOCUMENT: 59 of 78
 
UI: 96062442
AU: Yamaguchi A; Tsuchiya N  ; Mitsui H  ; Shiota M  ; Ogawa A  ; Tokunaga K
    ; Yoshinoya S  ; Juji T  ; Ito K
TI: Association  of  HLA-B39  with HLA-B27-negative ankylosing spondylitis
    and   pauciarticular   juvenile   rheumatoid   arthritis   in Japanese
    patients. Evidence for a role of the peptide-anchoring B pocket.
AD: University of Tokyo, Japan.
AB: OBJECTIVE.  To  investigate the characteristics of HLA-B27 that render
    susceptibility    to    seronegative    spondylarthropathies. METHODS.
    Serologic  HLA  class  I  typing  of Japanese patients with ankylosing
    spondylitis  (AS) , juvenile  rheumatoid  arthritis (JRA), and healthy
    controls,   was   performed.   HLA-B39   subtypes   were determined by
    polymerase    chain    reaction-sequence-specific  oligohybridization.
    RESULTS.  HLA-B27  was present in 40 of 48 patients with AS (83%), and
    in  only 1 of 210 healthy controls (0.5%). Three of 8 patients (37.5%)
    who  were  negative  for  HLA-B27 were positive for HLA-B39, which was
    significantly   higher   compared   with the HLA-B27-negative controls
    (6.2%;  P = 0.01). Significant association with HLA-B39 was also noted
    in  the  JRA  patients (16.7%; P < 0.01), especially in those patients
    with  pauciarticular-onset  disease  (33.3%;  P  <  0.01) .  Ten of 13
    HLA-B39-positive  patients  had  subtype  B* 3901  and  3  had B*3902.
    CONCLUSION.  Because  HLA-B27 and HLA-B39 share Glu at position 45 and
    Cys  at  position  67,  both  of  which  constitute  components of the
    peptide-anchoring   B   pocket,   and   because   they possess similar
    peptide-ligand  motifs, our results may support either the role of the
    peptides  presented  by  class  I antigens or the importance of Cys at
    position   67,   in   the   development   of  spondylarthropathies and
    pauciarticular-onset JRA.
 
SO: Arthritis Rheum 1995 Nov;38 (11):1672-7
                                                  DOCUMENT: 60 of 78
 
UI: 93292406
AU: McKenna F
TI: Efficacy  of  diclofenac/misoprostol vs diclofenac in the treatment of
    ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Rheumatic   Diseases   Unit,   Trafford   General Hospital, Davyhulme,
    Manchester, England.
AB: Patients  with  active  ankylosing  spondylitis  of at least 6 months'
    duration  were  stabilised  on  diclofenac 50mg, given 2, 3 or 4 times
    daily  in a 4-week open-label run-in. Patients were then randomised to
    receive   a   diclofenac   50mg/  misoprostol   200   micrograms fixed
    combination  tablet (n = 331) or diclofenac 50mg (n = 339) for 8 weeks
    at  the  same  dosage  frequency  as  in the open-label phase. For the
    intent-to-treat  cohorts  differences  between treatment groups in the
    primary  measures  of  efficacy  were  statistically significant. This
    between-group  difference  was  thought to be attributable to the high
    incidence   of   'unknown'   outcomes, particularly in the diclofenac/
    misoprostol  recipients.  No  significant differences were observed in
    the  modified  intention-to-treat or evaluable cohorts, which excluded
    patients  with  an  'unknown'  outcome.  No  significant between group
    differences   were   observed   in   the   change from baseline in the
    ankylosing  spondylitis assessments. A difference was apparent between
    groups  in  the  incidence  of  adverse events, particularly abdominal
    pain  and  diarrhoea  (18.1  and  17.2%,  respectively, in diclofenac/
    misoprostol  recipients  versus  12.4% each in diclofenac recipients).
    However, it was thought that the 4-week open-label phase of the study,
    during  which patients received only diclofenac, may have selected for
    diclofenac-tolerant  patients.  Thus,  in  the treatment of ankylosing
    spondylitis,  the diclofenac/misoprostol fixed tablet was as effective
    as   diclofenac.   Furthermore,   diclofenac/  misoprostol   was  well
    tolerated.
 
SO: Drugs 1993;45 Suppl 1 :24-30; discussion 36-7
                                                  DOCUMENT: 61 of 78
 
UI: 93343133
AU: Storek J; Glaspy JA  ; Grody WW  ; Susi E  ; Slater ED
TI: Adult-onset  cyclic  neutropenia responsive to cyclosporine therapy in
    a patient with ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Department of Medicine, UCLA School of Medicine.
AB: A   45-year-old   female   with   a   long history of HLA-B27-positive
    ankylosing   spondylitis   and   ulcerative   colitis developed cyclic
    neutropenia.  She was hospitalized for high fever during each of three
    consecutive   episodes   of   absolute   neutropenia.   On   the third
    hospitalization,   granulocyte-colony-stimulating   factor  (G-CSF), 5
    micrograms/ kg/ day,  was given by subcutaneous injection and resulted
    in  an  increase  of  absolute  neutrophil count from 0 to 2.2 x 10(9)
    /liter  and an associated decrease of platelet count and hemoglobin as
    well  as  severe  bone  and joint pain predominantly in the middle and
    lower   back   and   purulent   diarrhea.   The back pain necessitated
    discontinuation  of the drug. Oral cyclosporine therapy was begun, and
    although  the  neutrophil count continued to oscillate, both the peaks
    and   the   nadirs   were   higher   than  previously, and symptoms of
    neutropenia   subsided.   We   conclude   that  cyclosporine can be an
    effective    treatment    for    cyclic    neutropenia associated with
    autoimmunity   since   G-CSF   may   cause exacerbations of autoimmune
    disorders.
 
SO: Am J Hematol 1993 Jun;43 (2):139-43
                                                  DOCUMENT: 62 of 78
 
UI: 94285154
AU: Jim enez-Balderas FJ; Mintz G
TI: Ankylosing spondylitis: clinical course in women and men.
AD: Department  of  Rheumatology,  Hospital  de  Especialidades,  Centro M
    edico Nacional, IMSS, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.
AB: OBJECTIVE.   To   compare   the   clinical   course;   laboratory  and
    radiological  features  of  women  and men with ankylosing spondylitis
    (AS) .  METHODS. Retrospective review of charts of 41 women and 41 men
    with  AS  (25 B27+ and 16 B27- in each group) individually matched for
    age  at  onset  and  disease  duration.  RESULTS.  No differences were
    observed  in  the  clinical picture in either sex, but the disease was
    less  severe  in  women  than  in  men with lesser duration of uveitis
    attacks,   lower   leukocyte   counts   (p   <  0.05), lower levels of
    gamma-globulins  (p  <  0.05), and longer asymptomatic periods. At the
    end  of the study, women had less restriction of spinal extension (p =
    NS), less sequelae of uveitis without significant visual loss (p = NS)
    ,required  fewer  hip replacements, had less frequency of bamboo spine
    (p  <  0.02) , and  better  functional  class  (p  < 0.0027) than men.
    CONCLUSION.   There   are   no   significant  clinical or radiographic
    differences  between  women  and men with AS. However, the disease was
    more   severe   in   men   and   these   features may be due to sexual
    dimorphism.
 
SO: J Rheumatol 1993 Dec;20 (12):2069-72
                                                  DOCUMENT: 63 of 78
 
UI: 94311651
AU: Tutuncu ZN; Bilgie A  ; Kennedy LG  ; Calin A
TI: Interleukin-6,   acute   phase   reactants   and   clinical  status in
    ankylosing spondylitis [letter]
 
SO: Ann Rheum Dis 1994 Jun;53 (6):425-6
                                                  DOCUMENT: 64 of 78
 
UI: 95355933
AU: Alberts AS; Brighton SW  ; Kempff P  ; Louw WK  ; Beek AV  ; Kritzinger V
    ; Westerink HP  ; van Rensburg AJ
TI: Samarium-153-EDTMP  for  palliation of ankylosing spondylitis, Paget's
    disease and rheumatoid arthritis.
AD: Department  of  Radiotherapy,  H.F.  Verwoerd  Hospital, University of
    Pretoria, South Africa.
AB: Samarium-153-EDTMP  is an effective agent for palliation of widespread
    skeletal  metastases  because it concentrates in bone metastases which
    have  an  osteoblastic  component.  Similar  concentration in areas of
    osteoblastic  activity  in ankylosing spondylitis, Paget's disease and
    rheumatoid  arthritis  suggests  a  possible  new  treatment approach.
    Three  patients  with ankylosing spondylitis, one patient with Paget's
    disease  and  one  patient with rheumatoid arthritis were treated with
    153Sm-EDTMP.   Objective   and   subjective   improvement   was noted,
    especially  in ankylosing spondylitis patients. Samarium-153-EDTMP has
    disease-modifying  potential  in  ankylosing  spondylitis  and Paget's
    disease  and  has  palliative value in resistant rheumatoid arthritis.
    Further   trials   to   determine  optimal dose, treatment scheduling,
    long-term disease-modifying potential and toxicity are needed.
 
SO: J Nucl Med 1995 Aug;36 (8):1417-20
                                                  DOCUMENT: 65 of 78
 
UI: 96035923
AU: Kennedy LG; Jenkinson TR  ; Mallorie PA  ; Whitelock HC  ; Garrett SL  ;
    Calin A
TI: Ankylosing  spondylitis: the correlation between a new metrology score
    and radiology.
AD: Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath.
AB: The   objective   was   to   compare   the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis
    Metrology  Index  (BASMI)  with  radiology  as  a  measure  of disease
    outcome.   Fifty-three   patients,   covering   the entire spectrum of
    disease  severity,  were  blindly and independently assessed using the
    BASMI  (total  of  five standardized measurements, scoring range 0-10)
    and  a  radiology  score  of  the  four  main spinal areas affected by
    ankylosing  spondylitis  (AS) .  BASMI  correlates positively with the
    total  radiology  score  (r = 0.74), while the individual BASMI scores
    for  cervical  rotation  (r = 0.59), wall to tragus (r = 0.61), lumbar
    side  flexion (r = 0.56), lumbar flexion (r = 0.68) and intermalleolar
    distance   (r   =   0.50)   correlate positively with their respective
    radiology  scores.  BASMI  and  radiology  do  not relate well to each
    other  as  BASMI  takes account of normal physical limitation and soft
    tissue  involvement. In addition, although radiology scores are termed
    a  'gold  standard',  they  are  unreliable.  Therefore,  BASMI may be
    judged  to  be  more  important  in  assessing  AS  and become a 'gold
    standard' itself.
 
SO: Br J Rheumatol 1995 Aug;34 (8):767-70
                                                  DOCUMENT: 66 of 78
 
UI: 96035931
AU: Calin A; Jones SD  ; Garrett SL  ; Kennedy LG
TI: Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index [letter]
 
SO: Br J Rheumatol 1995 Aug;34 (8):793-4
                                                  DOCUMENT: 67 of 78
 
UI: 96047419
AU: Kremer P; Despaux J  ; Benmansour A  ; Wendling D
TI: Spontaneous  fracture  of  the  odontoid  process  in  a  patient with
    ankylosing  spondylitis.  Nonunion  responsible for compression of the
    upper cervical cord.
AD: Department  of  Rheumatology,  J.  Minjoz  Regional Teaching Hospital,
    Besancon, France.
AB: Tetraparesis  due  to  a  spontaneous  fracture  of  the  base  of the
    odontoid  process  occurred  in  a  patient with undiagnosed, advanced
    ankylosing  spondylitis.  Few  cases of insufficiency fractures of the
    proximal  cervical spine in patients with loss of spinal mobility have
    been  reported  in  the  literature.  The  pathologic lesions that can
    cause  severe  neurologic  compromise are reviewed. Because functional
    impairment   and   neurologic   loss   are  common even after surgical
    decompression  and  stabilization,  these lesions should be looked for
    during   a   careful   physical   evaluation   followed by appropriate
    investigations.
 
SO: Rev Rhum Engl Ed 1995 Jun;62 (6):455-8
                                                  DOCUMENT: 68 of 78
 
UI: 96047420
AU: Thepot C; Martigny J  ; Simon L  ; Bellin J  ; Larget-Piet B  ; Chevalier
    X
TI: Acute  polyarthritis  after  BCG-therapy  for  bladder  carcinoma in a
    patient with ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Department  of Rheumatology, Henri Mondor Teaching Hospital, Cr eteil,
    France.
AB: A  case  of  polyarthritis  following  intravesical  administration of
    bacillus  Calmette-Gu  erin (BCG) for bladder carcinoma is reported in
    a  patient  with  long-standing ankylosing spondylitis. Possible links
    between  BCG-therapy  and  joint  manifestations  are discussed in the
    light   of   data   from   the  literature. Patients who develop joint
    manifestations after BCG-therapy are often HLA B27-positive.
 
SO: Rev Rhum Engl Ed 1995 Jun;62 (6):459-61
                                                  DOCUMENT: 69 of 78
 
UI: 96044549
AU: Jattiot F; Goupille P  ; Valat JP
TI: Coexistence   of   diffuse   idiopathic   skeletal   hyperostosis  and
    ankylosing spondylitis in two patients [letter]
 
SO: Clin Exp Rheumatol 1995 May-Jun;13 (3):405-6
                                                  DOCUMENT: 70 of 78
 
UI: 96106384
AU: Viitanen JV; Kautiainen H  ; Kokko ML  ; Ala-Peijari S
TI: Age and spinal mobility in ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Rehabilitation  Institute,  Finnish Rheumatism Association, Kangasala,
    Finland.
AB: Mobility  measurements of spine, chest, hips, and shoulder in 73 adult
    males  with  ankylosing  spondylitis  (AS)  were  correlated  with the
    duration  of  disease.  Several  mobility  tests  showed a significant
    correlation  with  the  duration  of AS, but after adjustment for age,
    only   rotation   of   the   thoracolumbar   spine maintained a highly
    significant  correlation. It is concluded that age has a strong effect
    on  the  mobility  tests. Rotation of the thoracolumbar spine seems to
    be a valid measure for AS-specific changes.
 
SO: Scand J Rheumatol 1995;24 (5):314-5
                                                  DOCUMENT: 71 of 78
 
UI: 96106387
AU: Skomsvoll JF; Ostensen M  ; Romberg O  ; Anda S
TI: HLA-B27 negative ankylosing spondylitis in a father and a son.
AD: Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital of Trondheim, Norway.
AB: Only  5%  of  AS  patients  are B27 negative. We describe two cases of
    HLA-B27  negative AS in a father and a son who both developed clinical
    and  radiological  features  characteristic  of  AS. Tissue typing for
    HLA-A, -B, -C  was performed in all 1.degree family members except for
    the  father  who  died  in  1990.  All  family  members possessed B40.
    HLA-B40  may contribute to an increased susceptibility for AS not only
    in B27 positive individuals but also in B27 negative cases.
 
SO: Scand J Rheumatol 1995;24 (5):321-2
                                                  DOCUMENT: 72 of 78
 
UI: 96111170
AU: Toussirot E; Acquaviva PC
TI: Coexisting  rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis discussion
    of 3 cases with review of the literature.
AD: Department of Rheumatology, H^opital Timone, Marseille, France.
RF: 27
SO: Clin Rheumatol 1995 Sep;14 (5):554-60
                                                  DOCUMENT: 73 of 78
 
UI: 96110764
AU: Fujito T; Inoue T  ; Hoshi K  ; Hatano H  ; Kamishirado H  ; Takayanagi K
    ; Hayashi T  ; Morooka S  ; Takabatake Y  ; Uehara Y
TI: Systemic  amyloidosis following ankylosing spondylitis associated with
    congestive heart failure. A case report.
AD: Department   of   Cardiology,   Koshigaya  Hospital, Dokkyo University
    School of Medicine, Saitama, Japan.
AB: We  report the case of a 38-year-old man who developed fatal, systemic
    amyloidosis  following  ankylosing  spondylitis.  He  was admitted for
    symptoms  of  congestive  heart failure. Based on parotid gland biopsy
    and  echocardiography, he was diagnosed as having systemic amyloidosis
    following  active ankylosing spondylitis. However, the clinical course
    was  rapidly  progressive  and  eventually  the  patient died of acute
    necrotizing  pancreatitis.  The association has been reported thus far
    in  a  limited  number of cases worldwide. The literature has featured
    localized  lesions  and  a  benign clinical course of the amyloidosis.
    This   case,   the   first   report   from   Japan, indicates that the
    amyloidosis  associated  with  ankylosing  spondylitis might exhibit a
    rapidly  progressive  clinical course, thereby suggesting that in such
    a case, meticulous treatment is required.
RF: 17
SO: Jpn Heart J 1995 Sep;36 (5):681-8
                                                  DOCUMENT: 74 of 78
 
UI: 96079420
AU: Ferdoutsis M; Bouros D  ; Meletis G  ; Patsourakis G  ; Siafakas NM
TI: Diffuse   interstitial   lung   disease   as an early manifestation of
    ankylosing spondylitis.
AD: Department   of   Thoracic   Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion,
    Greece.
AB: A  rare  case  of  ankylosing  spondylitis with interstitial pulmonary
    disease  of the upper lung field, at an early stage in the disease, is
    described.   The   patient,   a   35-year-old  asymptomatic woman, was
    admitted  to the hospital due to an abnormal chest radiograph that was
    found  during  preoperative  evaluation  for  a  toxic  adenoma of the
    thyroid  gland.  Her  mother and sister were also found to suffer from
    ankylosing   spondylitis   but   without   lung  involvement. History,
    physical  and  laboratory  examination  as  well  as  open lung biopsy
    excluded  other  causes  of  an  interstitial  pulmonary  disease. The
    diagnosis   of   ankylosing   spondylitis   was   based   on clinical,
    radiographic,   positive   human   leukocyte   antigen   (HLA-B27) and
    histologic findings.
 
SO: Respiration 1995;62 (5):286-9
                                                  DOCUMENT: 75 of 78
 
UI: 96166049
AU: Wo zniak E; Bronarski J
TI: [Injuries  of  the  cervical  spine  and  spinal cord in patients with
    ankylosing spondylitis--diagnosis using magnetic resonance imaging]
AD: Centrum Rehabilitacji, Konstancinie.
AB: Magnetic  resonance  (MR)  imaging  results  in  8  from 14 ankylosing
    spondylitis  patients  treated  of traumatic cervical spine and spinal
    cord  injuries  are  presented.  Focal changes within spinal cord were
    most  common among complications (62%), epidural hematoma was found in
    50%  of  cases.  Neurological  status  has  worsened  in patients with
    post-traumatic spinal cord pathology.
 
SO: Chir Narzadow Ruchu Ortop Pol 1995;60 (5):353-8
                                                  DOCUMENT: 76 of 78
 
UI: 96164837
AU: Beyeler C; Armstrong M  ; Bird HA  ; Idle JR  ; Daly AK
TI: Relationship  between  genotype  for  the  cytochrome  P450 CYP2D6 and
    susceptibility to ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis.
AD: Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital, Berne, Switzerland.
AB: OBJECTIVES--To   determine   whether   particular   genotypes  for the
    cytochrome  P450  enzyme  CYP2D6, a polymorphic enzyme, are associated
    with  susceptibility  to  ankylosing  spondylitis  (AS) and rheumatoid
    arthritis  (RA) , or  linked  with  any  specific clinical or familial
    features   of   the   two   conditions. METHODS--CYP2D6 genotypes were
    determined  in  54  patients  with  AS,  53  patients with RA, and 662
    healthy  controls.  Leucocyte  DNA  was  analysed  for the presence of
    mutations  by  restriction  fragment length polymorphism analysis with
    the  restriction  enzyme  Xbal  and  by  two separate polymerase chain
    reaction   assays.   RESULTS--On   the   basis   of   odds  ratio (OR)
    ,individuals  with  two  inactive CYP2D6 alleles were more susceptible
    to  AS  than  controls  (OR 2.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04 to
    7.08) , with a stronger effect for the CYP2D6B allele (OR 4.11, 95% CI
    1.54  to  11.0) .  No  significant  differences in the distribution of
    overall  genotypes and allele frequencies were observed between RA and
    controls.   No   significant   relationships   were  found between the
    skeletal,  extraskeletal  or  familial  features  of AS or RA (iritis,
    psoriasis,    inflammatory    enteropathy    and   rheumatoid nodules,
    kerato-conjunctivitis  sicca,  pleuritis,  rheumatoid  and antinuclear
    factors)  and  the overall genotype. CONCLUSIONS--Our findings suggest
    a modest association between homozygosity for inactive CYP2D6 alleles,
    particularly  CYP2D6B  alleles, and susceptibility to AS. However, our
    results  fail  to  demonstrate  a genetic link between CYP2D6 genotype
    and RA.
 
SO: Ann Rheum Dis 1996 Jan;55 (1):66-8
                                                  DOCUMENT: 77 of 78
 
UI: 96124011
AU: Apple DF Jr; Anson C
TI: Spinal  cord injury occurring in patients with ankylosing spondylitis:
    a multicenter study.
AD: Shepherd Center, Atlanta, Ga 30309, USA.
AB: Treatment  of  spinal  fractures  causing  paralysis  in patients with
    ankylosing  spondylitis  is  difficult. A multicenter concurrent study
    evaluated  59  patients--22 managed operatively and 37 nonoperatively.
    The  two  groups  were compared for neurologic outcome, complications,
    mortality,  and length of stay. The results indicated that patients in
    the nonoperative group had a significantly shorter length of stay and,
    therefore,  a  significantly  lower cost of care. No other differences
    between  operative  and  nonoperative groups were identified in regard
    to   other   outcome   variables.   Results of descriptive analyses of
    patient   characteristics   and   treatment   choices have significant
    implications for practitioners.
 
SO: Orthopedics 1995 Oct;18 (10):1005-11
                                                  DOCUMENT: 78 of 78
 
UI: 96026931
AU: D'Amato M; Fiorillo MT  ; Galeazzi M  ; Martinetti M  ; Amoroso A  ;
    Sorrentino R
TI: Frequency  of  the  new  HLA-B* 2709  allele in ankylosing spondylitis
    patients and healthy individuals.
AD: Department  of  Cell  Biology  and  Development, University of Rome La
    Sapienza, Italy.
 
SO: Dis Markers 1995 Aug;12 (3):215-7
 
 On Tue, 30 Apr 1996, J.
Angel Ledesma S. wrote:
 
> anybody have information about Ankylosing Spondylitis?
>
>        ===================================================
>                      Nut. J. Angel Ledesma S.
>                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>                Instituto Nacional de Nutricion "SZ"
>                        [log in to unmask]
>               A.P. 86-252, Mexico D.F., 14391 MEXICO
>                        fax: (52 5) 547-2778
>         Human Nutrition, WEB: http://spin.com.mx/~jledesma
>        ===================================================
>

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December 2017, Week 3
December 2017, Week 2
December 2017, Week 1
November 2017, Week 5
November 2017, Week 4
November 2017, Week 3
November 2017, Week 2
November 2017, Week 1
October 2017, Week 5
October 2017, Week 4
October 2017, Week 3
October 2017, Week 2
October 2017, Week 1
September 2017, Week 5
September 2017, Week 4
September 2017, Week 3
September 2017, Week 2
September 2017, Week 1
August 2017, Week 5
August 2017, Week 4
August 2017, Week 3
August 2017, Week 2
August 2017, Week 1
July 2017, Week 5
July 2017, Week 4
July 2017, Week 3
July 2017, Week 2
July 2017, Week 1
June 2017, Week 5
June 2017, Week 4
June 2017, Week 3
June 2017, Week 2
June 2017, Week 1
May 2017, Week 5
May 2017, Week 4
May 2017, Week 3
May 2017, Week 2
May 2017, Week 1
April 2017, Week 5
April 2017, Week 4
April 2017, Week 3
April 2017, Week 2
April 2017, Week 1
March 2017, Week 5
March 2017, Week 4
March 2017, Week 3
March 2017, Week 2
March 2017, Week 1
February 2017, Week 4
February 2017, Week 3
February 2017, Week 2
February 2017, Week 1
January 2017, Week 5
January 2017, Week 4
January 2017, Week 3
January 2017, Week 2
January 2017, Week 1
December 2016, Week 5
December 2016, Week 4
December 2016, Week 3
December 2016, Week 2
December 2016, Week 1
November 2016, Week 5
November 2016, Week 4
November 2016, Week 3
November 2016, Week 2
November 2016, Week 1
October 2016, Week 5
October 2016, Week 4
October 2016, Week 3
October 2016, Week 2
October 2016, Week 1
September 2016, Week 5
September 2016, Week 4
September 2016, Week 3
September 2016, Week 2
September 2016, Week 1
August 2016, Week 5
August 2016, Week 4
August 2016, Week 3
August 2016, Week 2
August 2016, Week 1
July 2016, Week 5
July 2016, Week 4
July 2016, Week 3
July 2016, Week 2
July 2016, Week 1
June 2016, Week 5
June 2016, Week 4
June 2016, Week 3
June 2016, Week 2
June 2016, Week 1
May 2016, Week 5
May 2016, Week 4
May 2016, Week 3
May 2016, Week 2
May 2016, Week 1
April 2016, Week 5
April 2016, Week 4
April 2016, Week 3
April 2016, Week 2
April 2016, Week 1
March 2016, Week 5
March 2016, Week 4
March 2016, Week 3
March 2016, Week 2
March 2016, Week 1
February 2016, Week 5
February 2016, Week 4
February 2016, Week 3
February 2016, Week 2
February 2016, Week 1
January 2016, Week 5
January 2016, Week 4
January 2016, Week 3
January 2016, Week 2
January 2016, Week 1
December 2015, Week 5
December 2015, Week 4
December 2015, Week 3
December 2015, Week 2
December 2015, Week 1
November 2015, Week 5
November 2015, Week 4
November 2015, Week 3
November 2015, Week 2
November 2015, Week 1
October 2015, Week 5
October 2015, Week 4
October 2015, Week 3
October 2015, Week 2
October 2015, Week 1
September 2015, Week 5
September 2015, Week 4
September 2015, Week 3
September 2015, Week 2
September 2015, Week 1
August 2015, Week 5
August 2015, Week 4
August 2015, Week 3
August 2015, Week 2
August 2015, Week 1
July 2015, Week 5
July 2015, Week 4
July 2015, Week 3
July 2015, Week 2
July 2015, Week 1
June 2015, Week 5
June 2015, Week 4
June 2015, Week 3
June 2015, Week 2
June 2015, Week 1
May 2015, Week 5
May 2015, Week 4
May 2015, Week 3
May 2015, Week 2
May 2015, Week 1
April 2015, Week 5
April 2015, Week 4
April 2015, Week 3
April 2015, Week 2
April 2015, Week 1
March 2015, Week 5
March 2015, Week 4
March 2015, Week 3
March 2015, Week 2
March 2015, Week 1
February 2015, Week 4
February 2015, Week 3
February 2015, Week 2
February 2015, Week 1
January 2015, Week 5
January 2015, Week 4
January 2015, Week 3
January 2015, Week 2
January 2015, Week 1
December 2014, Week 5
December 2014, Week 4
December 2014, Week 3
December 2014, Week 2
December 2014, Week 1
November 2014, Week 5
November 2014, Week 4
November 2014, Week 3
November 2014, Week 2
November 2014, Week 1
October 2014, Week 5
October 2014, Week 4
October 2014, Week 3
October 2014, Week 2
October 2014, Week 1
September 2014, Week 5
September 2014, Week 4
September 2014, Week 3
September 2014, Week 2
September 2014, Week 1
August 2014, Week 5
August 2014, Week 4
August 2014, Week 3
August 2014, Week 2
August 2014, Week 1
July 2014, Week 5
July 2014, Week 4
July 2014, Week 3
July 2014, Week 2
July 2014, Week 1
June 2014, Week 5
June 2014, Week 4
June 2014, Week 3
June 2014, Week 2
June 2014, Week 1
May 2014, Week 5
May 2014, Week 4
May 2014, Week 3
May 2014, Week 2
May 2014, Week 1
April 2014, Week 5
April 2014, Week 4
April 2014, Week 3
April 2014, Week 2
April 2014, Week 1
March 2014, Week 5
March 2014, Week 4
March 2014, Week 3
March 2014, Week 2
March 2014, Week 1
February 2014, Week 4
February 2014, Week 3
February 2014, Week 2
February 2014, Week 1
January 2014, Week 5
January 2014, Week 4
January 2014, Week 3
January 2014, Week 2
January 2014, Week 1
December 2013, Week 5
December 2013, Week 4
December 2013, Week 3
December 2013, Week 2
December 2013, Week 1
November 2013, Week 5
November 2013, Week 4
November 2013, Week 3
November 2013, Week 2
November 2013, Week 1
October 2013, Week 5
October 2013, Week 4
October 2013, Week 3
October 2013, Week 2
October 2013, Week 1
September 2013, Week 5
September 2013, Week 4
September 2013, Week 3
September 2013, Week 2
September 2013, Week 1
August 2013, Week 5
August 2013, Week 4
August 2013, Week 3
August 2013, Week 2
August 2013, Week 1
July 2013, Week 5
July 2013, Week 4
July 2013, Week 3
July 2013, Week 2
July 2013, Week 1
June 2013, Week 5
June 2013, Week 4
June 2013, Week 3
June 2013, Week 2
June 2013, Week 1
May 2013, Week 5
May 2013, Week 4
May 2013, Week 3
May 2013, Week 2
May 2013, Week 1
April 2013, Week 5
April 2013, Week 4
April 2013, Week 3
April 2013, Week 2
April 2013, Week 1
March 2013, Week 5
March 2013, Week 4
March 2013, Week 3
March 2013, Week 2
March 2013, Week 1
February 2013, Week 4
February 2013, Week 3
February 2013, Week 2
February 2013, Week 1
January 2013, Week 5
January 2013, Week 4
January 2013, Week 3
January 2013, Week 2
January 2013, Week 1
December 2012, Week 5
December 2012, Week 4
December 2012, Week 3
December 2012, Week 2
December 2012, Week 1
November 2012, Week 5
November 2012, Week 4
November 2012, Week 3
November 2012, Week 2
November 2012, Week 1
October 2012, Week 5
October 2012, Week 4
October 2012, Week 3
October 2012, Week 2
October 2012, Week 1
September 2012, Week 5
September 2012, Week 4
September 2012, Week 3
September 2012, Week 2
September 2012, Week 1
August 2012, Week 5
August 2012, Week 4
August 2012, Week 3
August 2012, Week 2
August 2012, Week 1
July 2012, Week 5
July 2012, Week 4
July 2012, Week 3
July 2012, Week 2
July 2012, Week 1
June 2012, Week 5
June 2012, Week 4
June 2012, Week 3
June 2012, Week 2
June 2012, Week 1
May 2012, Week 5
May 2012, Week 4
May 2012, Week 3
May 2012, Week 2
May 2012, Week 1
April 2012, Week 5
April 2012, Week 4
April 2012, Week 3
April 2012, Week 2
April 2012, Week 1
March 2012, Week 5
March 2012, Week 4
March 2012, Week 3
March 2012, Week 2
March 2012, Week 1
February 2012, Week 5
February 2012, Week 4
February 2012, Week 3
February 2012, Week 2
February 2012, Week 1
January 2012, Week 5
January 2012, Week 4
January 2012, Week 3
January 2012, Week 2
January 2012, Week 1
December 2011, Week 5
December 2011, Week 4
December 2011, Week 3
December 2011, Week 2
December 2011, Week 1
November 2011, Week 5
November 2011, Week 4
November 2011, Week 3
November 2011, Week 2
November 2011, Week 1
October 2011, Week 5
October 2011, Week 4
October 2011, Week 3
October 2011, Week 2
October 2011, Week 1
September 2011, Week 5
September 2011, Week 4
September 2011, Week 3
September 2011, Week 2
September 2011, Week 1
August 2011, Week 5
August 2011, Week 4
August 2011, Week 3
August 2011, Week 2
August 2011, Week 1
July 2011, Week 5
July 2011, Week 4
July 2011, Week 3
July 2011, Week 2
July 2011, Week 1
June 2011, Week 5
June 2011, Week 4
June 2011, Week 3
June 2011, Week 2
June 2011, Week 1
May 2011, Week 5
May 2011, Week 4
May 2011, Week 3
May 2011, Week 2
May 2011, Week 1
April 2011, Week 5
April 2011, Week 4
April 2011, Week 3
April 2011, Week 2
April 2011, Week 1
March 2011, Week 5
March 2011, Week 4
March 2011, Week 3
March 2011, Week 2
March 2011, Week 1
February 2011, Week 4
February 2011, Week 3
February 2011, Week 2
February 2011, Week 1
January 2011, Week 5
January 2011, Week 4
January 2011, Week 3
January 2011, Week 2
January 2011, Week 1
December 2010, Week 5
December 2010, Week 4
December 2010, Week 3
December 2010, Week 2
December 2010, Week 1
November 2010, Week 5
November 2010, Week 4
November 2010, Week 3
November 2010, Week 2
November 2010, Week 1
October 2010, Week 5
October 2010, Week 4
October 2010, Week 3
October 2010, Week 2
October 2010, Week 1
September 2010, Week 5
September 2010, Week 4
September 2010, Week 3
September 2010, Week 2
September 2010, Week 1
August 2010, Week 5
August 2010, Week 4
August 2010, Week 3
August 2010, Week 2
August 2010, Week 1
July 2010, Week 5
July 2010, Week 4
July 2010, Week 3
July 2010, Week 2
July 2010, Week 1
June 2010, Week 5
June 2010, Week 4
June 2010, Week 3
June 2010, Week 2
June 2010, Week 1
May 2010, Week 5
May 2010, Week 4
May 2010, Week 3
May 2010, Week 2
May 2010, Week 1
April 2010, Week 5
April 2010, Week 4
April 2010, Week 3
April 2010, Week 2
April 2010, Week 1
March 2010, Week 5
March 2010, Week 4
March 2010, Week 3
March 2010, Week 2
March 2010, Week 1
February 2010, Week 4
February 2010, Week 3
February 2010, Week 2
February 2010, Week 1
January 2010, Week 5
January 2010, Week 4
January 2010, Week 3
January 2010, Week 2
January 2010, Week 1
December 2009, Week 5
December 2009, Week 4
December 2009, Week 3
December 2009, Week 2
December 2009, Week 1
November 2009, Week 5
November 2009, Week 4
November 2009, Week 3
November 2009, Week 2
November 2009, Week 1
October 2009, Week 5
October 2009, Week 4
October 2009, Week 3
October 2009, Week 2
October 2009, Week 1
September 2009, Week 5
September 2009, Week 4
September 2009, Week 3
September 2009, Week 2
September 2009, Week 1
August 2009, Week 5
August 2009, Week 4
August 2009, Week 3
August 2009, Week 2
August 2009, Week 1
July 2009, Week 5
July 2009, Week 4
July 2009, Week 3
July 2009, Week 2
July 2009, Week 1
June 2009, Week 5
June 2009, Week 4
June 2009, Week 3
June 2009, Week 2
June 2009, Week 1
May 2009, Week 5
May 2009, Week 4
May 2009, Week 3
May 2009, Week 2
May 2009, Week 1
April 2009, Week 5
April 2009, Week 4
April 2009, Week 3
April 2009, Week 2
April 2009, Week 1
March 2009, Week 5
March 2009, Week 4
March 2009, Week 3
March 2009, Week 2
March 2009, Week 1
February 2009, Week 4
February 2009, Week 3
February 2009, Week 2
February 2009, Week 1
January 2009, Week 5
January 2009, Week 4
January 2009, Week 3
January 2009, Week 2
January 2009, Week 1
December 2008, Week 5
December 2008, Week 4
December 2008, Week 3
December 2008, Week 2
December 2008, Week 1
November 2008, Week 5
November 2008, Week 4
November 2008, Week 3
November 2008, Week 2
November 2008, Week 1
October 2008, Week 5
October 2008, Week 4
October 2008, Week 3
October 2008, Week 2
October 2008, Week 1
September 2008, Week 5
September 2008, Week 4
September 2008, Week 3
September 2008, Week 2
September 2008, Week 1
August 2008, Week 5
August 2008, Week 4
August 2008, Week 3
August 2008, Week 2
August 2008, Week 1
July 2008, Week 5
July 2008, Week 4
July 2008, Week 3
July 2008, Week 2
July 2008, Week 1
June 2008, Week 5
June 2008, Week 4
June 2008, Week 3
June 2008, Week 2
June 2008, Week 1
May 2008, Week 5
May 2008, Week 4
May 2008, Week 3
May 2008, Week 2
May 2008, Week 1
April 2008, Week 5
April 2008, Week 4
April 2008, Week 3
April 2008, Week 2
April 2008, Week 1
March 2008, Week 5
March 2008, Week 4
March 2008, Week 3
March 2008, Week 2
March 2008, Week 1
February 2008, Week 5
February 2008, Week 4
February 2008, Week 3
February 2008, Week 2
February 2008, Week 1
January 2008, Week 5
January 2008, Week 4
January 2008, Week 3
January 2008, Week 2
January 2008, Week 1
December 2007, Week 5
December 2007, Week 4
December 2007, Week 3
December 2007, Week 2
December 2007, Week 1
November 2007, Week 5
November 2007, Week 4
November 2007, Week 3
November 2007, Week 2
November 2007, Week 1
October 2007, Week 5
October 2007, Week 4
October 2007, Week 3
October 2007, Week 2
October 2007, Week 1
September 2007, Week 5
September 2007, Week 4
September 2007, Week 3
September 2007, Week 2
September 2007, Week 1
August 2007, Week 5
August 2007, Week 4
August 2007, Week 3
August 2007, Week 2
August 2007, Week 1
July 2007, Week 5
July 2007, Week 4
July 2007, Week 3
July 2007, Week 2
July 2007, Week 1
June 2007, Week 5
June 2007, Week 4
June 2007, Week 3
June 2007, Week 2
June 2007, Week 1
May 2007, Week 5
May 2007, Week 4
May 2007, Week 3
May 2007, Week 2
May 2007, Week 1
April 2007, Week 4
April 2007, Week 3
April 2007, Week 2
April 2007, Week 1
March 2007, Week 5
March 2007, Week 4
March 2007, Week 3
March 2007, Week 2
March 2007, Week 1
February 2007, Week 4
February 2007, Week 3
February 2007, Week 2
February 2007, Week 1
January 2007, Week 5
January 2007, Week 4
January 2007, Week 3
January 2007, Week 2
January 2007, Week 1
December 2006, Week 5
December 2006, Week 4
December 2006, Week 3
December 2006, Week 2
December 2006, Week 1
November 2006, Week 5
November 2006, Week 4
November 2006, Week 3
November 2006, Week 2
November 2006, Week 1
October 2006, Week 5
October 2006, Week 4
October 2006, Week 3
October 2006, Week 2
October 2006, Week 1
September 2006, Week 5
September 2006, Week 4
September 2006, Week 3
September 2006, Week 2
September 2006, Week 1
August 2006, Week 5
August 2006, Week 4
August 2006, Week 3
August 2006, Week 2
August 2006, Week 1
July 2006, Week 5
July 2006, Week 4
July 2006, Week 3
July 2006, Week 2
July 2006, Week 1
June 2006, Week 5
June 2006, Week 4
June 2006, Week 3
June 2006, Week 2
June 2006, Week 1
May 2006, Week 5
May 2006, Week 4
May 2006, Week 3
May 2006, Week 2
May 2006, Week 1
April 2006, Week 4
April 2006, Week 3
April 2006, Week 2
April 2006, Week 1
March 2006, Week 5
March 2006, Week 4
March 2006, Week 3
March 2006, Week 2
March 2006, Week 1
February 2006, Week 4
February 2006, Week 3
February 2006, Week 2
February 2006, Week 1
January 2006, Week 5
January 2006, Week 4
January 2006, Week 3
January 2006, Week 2
January 2006, Week 1
December 2005, Week 5
December 2005, Week 4
December 2005, Week 3
December 2005, Week 2
December 2005, Week 1
November 2005, Week 5
November 2005, Week 4
November 2005, Week 3
November 2005, Week 2
November 2005, Week 1
October 2005, Week 5
October 2005, Week 4
October 2005, Week 3
October 2005, Week 2
October 2005, Week 1
September 2005, Week 5
September 2005, Week 4
September 2005, Week 3
September 2005, Week 2
September 2005, Week 1
August 2005, Week 5
August 2005, Week 4
August 2005, Week 3
August 2005, Week 2
August 2005, Week 1
July 2005, Week 5
July 2005, Week 4
July 2005, Week 3
July 2005, Week 2
July 2005, Week 1
June 2005, Week 5
June 2005, Week 4
June 2005, Week 3
June 2005, Week 2
June 2005, Week 1
May 2005, Week 5
May 2005, Week 4
May 2005, Week 3
May 2005, Week 2
May 2005, Week 1
April 2005, Week 5
April 2005, Week 4
April 2005, Week 3
April 2005, Week 2
April 2005, Week 1
March 2005, Week 5
March 2005, Week 4
March 2005, Week 3
March 2005, Week 2
March 2005, Week 1
February 2005, Week 4
February 2005, Week 3
February 2005, Week 2
February 2005, Week 1
January 2005, Week 5
January 2005, Week 4
January 2005, Week 3
January 2005, Week 2
January 2005, Week 1
December 2004, Week 5
December 2004, Week 4
December 2004, Week 3
December 2004, Week 2
December 2004, Week 1
November 2004, Week 5
November 2004, Week 4
November 2004, Week 3
November 2004, Week 2
November 2004, Week 1
October 2004, Week 5
October 2004, Week 4
October 2004, Week 3
October 2004, Week 2
October 2004, Week 1
September 2004, Week 5
September 2004, Week 4
September 2004, Week 3
September 2004, Week 2
September 2004, Week 1
August 2004, Week 5
August 2004, Week 4
August 2004, Week 3
August 2004, Week 2
August 2004, Week 1
July 2004, Week 5
July 2004, Week 4
July 2004, Week 3
July 2004, Week 2
July 2004, Week 1
June 2004, Week 5
June 2004, Week 4
June 2004, Week 3
June 2004, Week 2
June 2004, Week 1
May 2004, Week 4
May 2004, Week 3
May 2004, Week 2
May 2004, Week 1
April 2004, Week 5
April 2004, Week 4
April 2004, Week 3
April 2004, Week 2
April 2004, Week 1
March 2004, Week 5
March 2004, Week 4
March 2004, Week 3
March 2004, Week 2
March 2004, Week 1
February 2004, Week 5
February 2004, Week 4
February 2004, Week 3
February 2004, Week 2
February 2004, Week 1
January 2004, Week 5
January 2004, Week 4
January 2004, Week 3
January 2004, Week 2
January 2004, Week 1
December 2003, Week 5
December 2003, Week 4
December 2003, Week 3
December 2003, Week 2
December 2003, Week 1
November 2003, Week 5
November 2003, Week 4
November 2003, Week 3
November 2003, Week 2
November 2003, Week 1
October 2003, Week 5
October 2003, Week 4
October 2003, Week 3
October 2003, Week 2
October 2003, Week 1
September 2003, Week 5
September 2003, Week 4
September 2003, Week 3
September 2003, Week 2
September 2003, Week 1
August 2003, Week 5
August 2003, Week 4
August 2003, Week 3
August 2003, Week 2
August 2003, Week 1
July 2003, Week 5
July 2003, Week 4
July 2003, Week 3
July 2003, Week 2
July 2003, Week 1
June 2003, Week 5
June 2003, Week 4
June 2003, Week 3
June 2003, Week 2
June 2003, Week 1
May 2003, Week 5
May 2003, Week 4
May 2003, Week 3
May 2003, Week 2
May 2003, Week 1
April 2003, Week 5
April 2003, Week 4
April 2003, Week 3
April 2003, Week 2
April 2003, Week 1
March 2003, Week 5
March 2003, Week 4
March 2003, Week 3
March 2003, Week 2
March 2003, Week 1
February 2003, Week 4
February 2003, Week 3
February 2003, Week 2
February 2003, Week 1
January 2003, Week 5
January 2003, Week 4
January 2003, Week 3
January 2003, Week 2
January 2003, Week 1
December 2002, Week 5
December 2002, Week 4
December 2002, Week 3
December 2002, Week 2
December 2002, Week 1
November 2002, Week 5
November 2002, Week 4
November 2002, Week 3
November 2002, Week 2
November 2002, Week 1
October 2002, Week 5
October 2002, Week 4
October 2002, Week 3
October 2002, Week 2
October 2002, Week 1
September 2002, Week 5
September 2002, Week 4
September 2002, Week 3
September 2002, Week 2
September 2002, Week 1
August 2002, Week 5
August 2002, Week 4
August 2002, Week 3
August 2002, Week 2
August 2002, Week 1
July 2002, Week 5
July 2002, Week 4
July 2002, Week 3
July 2002, Week 2
July 2002, Week 1
June 2002, Week 5
June 2002, Week 4
June 2002, Week 3
June 2002, Week 2
June 2002, Week 1
May 2002, Week 5
May 2002, Week 4
May 2002, Week 3
May 2002, Week 2
May 2002, Week 1
April 2002, Week 5
April 2002, Week 4
April 2002, Week 3
April 2002, Week 2
April 2002, Week 1
March 2002, Week 5
March 2002, Week 4
March 2002, Week 3
March 2002, Week 2
March 2002, Week 1
February 2002, Week 4
February 2002, Week 3
February 2002, Week 2
February 2002, Week 1
January 2002, Week 5
January 2002, Week 4
January 2002, Week 3
January 2002, Week 2
January 2002, Week 1
December 2001, Week 5
December 2001, Week 4
December 2001, Week 3
December 2001, Week 2
December 2001, Week 1
November 2001, Week 5
November 2001, Week 4
November 2001, Week 3
November 2001, Week 2
November 2001, Week 1
October 2001, Week 5
October 2001, Week 4
October 2001, Week 3
October 2001, Week 2
October 2001, Week 1
September 2001, Week 5
September 2001, Week 4
September 2001, Week 3
September 2001, Week 2
September 2001, Week 1
August 2001, Week 5
August 2001, Week 4
August 2001, Week 3
August 2001, Week 2
August 2001, Week 1
July 2001, Week 5
July 2001, Week 4
July 2001, Week 3
July 2001, Week 2
July 2001, Week 1
June 2001, Week 5
June 2001, Week 4
June 2001, Week 3
June 2001, Week 2
June 2001, Week 1
May 2001, Week 5
May 2001, Week 4
May 2001, Week 3
May 2001, Week 2
May 2001, Week 1
April 2001, Week 5
April 2001, Week 4
April 2001, Week 3
April 2001, Week 2
April 2001, Week 1
March 2001, Week 5
March 2001, Week 4
March 2001, Week 3
March 2001, Week 2
March 2001, Week 1
February 2001, Week 4
February 2001, Week 3
February 2001, Week 2
February 2001, Week 1
January 2001, Week 5
January 2001, Week 4
January 2001, Week 3
January 2001, Week 2
January 2001, Week 1
December 2000, Week 5
December 2000, Week 4
December 2000, Week 3
December 2000, Week 2
December 2000, Week 1
November 2000, Week 5
November 2000, Week 4
November 2000, Week 3
November 2000, Week 2
November 2000, Week 1
October 2000, Week 5
October 2000, Week 4
October 2000, Week 3
October 2000, Week 2
October 2000, Week 1
September 2000, Week 5
September 2000, Week 4
September 2000, Week 3
September 2000, Week 2
September 2000, Week 1
August 2000, Week 5
August 2000, Week 4
August 2000, Week 3
August 2000, Week 2
August 2000, Week 1
July 2000, Week 5
July 2000, Week 4
July 2000, Week 3
July 2000, Week 2
July 2000, Week 1
June 2000, Week 5
June 2000, Week 4
June 2000, Week 3
June 2000, Week 2
June 2000, Week 1
May 2000, Week 5
May 2000, Week 4
May 2000, Week 3
May 2000, Week 2
May 2000, Week 1
April 2000, Week 5
April 2000, Week 4
April 2000, Week 3
April 2000, Week 2
April 2000, Week 1
March 2000, Week 5
March 2000, Week 4
March 2000, Week 3
March 2000, Week 2
March 2000, Week 1
February 2000, Week 5
February 2000, Week 4
February 2000, Week 3
February 2000, Week 2
February 2000, Week 1
January 2000, Week 5
January 2000, Week 4
January 2000, Week 3
January 2000, Week 2
January 2000, Week 1
December 1999, Week 5
December 1999, Week 4
December 1999, Week 3
December 1999, Week 2
December 1999, Week 1
November 1999, Week 5
November 1999, Week 4
November 1999, Week 3
November 1999, Week 2
November 1999, Week 1
October 1999, Week 5
October 1999, Week 4
October 1999, Week 3
October 1999, Week 2
October 1999, Week 1
September 1999, Week 5
September 1999, Week 4
September 1999, Week 3
September 1999, Week 2
September 1999, Week 1
August 1999, Week 5
August 1999, Week 4
August 1999, Week 3
August 1999, Week 2
August 1999, Week 1
July 1999, Week 5
July 1999, Week 4
July 1999, Week 3
July 1999, Week 2
July 1999, Week 1
June 1999, Week 5
June 1999, Week 4
June 1999, Week 3
June 1999, Week 2
June 1999, Week 1
May 1999, Week 5
May 1999, Week 4
May 1999, Week 3
May 1999, Week 2
May 1999, Week 1
April 1999, Week 5
April 1999, Week 4
April 1999, Week 3
April 1999, Week 2
April 1999, Week 1
March 1999, Week 5
March 1999, Week 4
March 1999, Week 3
March 1999, Week 2
March 1999, Week 1
February 1999, Week 4
February 1999, Week 3
February 1999, Week 2
February 1999, Week 1
January 1999, Week 5
January 1999, Week 4
January 1999, Week 3
January 1999, Week 2
January 1999, Week 1
December 1998, Week 5
December 1998, Week 4
December 1998, Week 3
December 1998, Week 2
December 1998, Week 1
November 1998, Week 5
November 1998, Week 4
November 1998, Week 3
November 1998, Week 2
November 1998, Week 1
October 1998, Week 5
October 1998, Week 4
October 1998, Week 3
October 1998, Week 2
October 1998, Week 1
September 1998, Week 5
September 1998, Week 4
September 1998, Week 3
September 1998, Week 2
September 1998, Week 1
August 1998, Week 5
August 1998, Week 4
August 1998, Week 3
August 1998, Week 2
August 1998, Week 1
July 1998, Week 5
July 1998, Week 4
July 1998, Week 3
July 1998, Week 2
July 1998, Week 1
June 1998, Week 5
June 1998, Week 4
June 1998, Week 3
June 1998, Week 2
June 1998, Week 1
May 1998, Week 5
May 1998, Week 4
May 1998, Week 3
May 1998, Week 2
May 1998, Week 1
April 1998, Week 5
April 1998, Week 4
April 1998, Week 3
April 1998, Week 2
April 1998, Week 1
March 1998, Week 5
March 1998, Week 4
March 1998, Week 3
March 1998, Week 2
March 1998, Week 1
February 1998, Week 4
February 1998, Week 3
February 1998, Week 2
February 1998, Week 1
January 1998, Week 5
January 1998, Week 4
January 1998, Week 3
January 1998, Week 2
January 1998, Week 1
December 1997, Week 5
December 1997, Week 4
December 1997, Week 3
December 1997, Week 2
December 1997, Week 1
November 1997, Week 5
November 1997, Week 4
November 1997, Week 3
November 1997, Week 2
November 1997, Week 1
October 1997, Week 5
October 1997, Week 4
October 1997, Week 3
October 1997, Week 2
October 1997, Week 1
September 1997, Week 5
September 1997, Week 4
September 1997, Week 3
September 1997, Week 2
September 1997, Week 1
August 1997, Week 5
August 1997, Week 4
August 1997, Week 3
August 1997, Week 2
August 1997, Week 1
July 1997, Week 5
July 1997, Week 4
July 1997, Week 3
July 1997, Week 2
July 1997, Week 1
June 1997, Week 5
June 1997, Week 4
June 1997, Week 3
June 1997, Week 2
June 1997, Week 1
May 1997, Week 5
May 1997, Week 4
May 1997, Week 3
May 1997, Week 2
May 1997, Week 1
April 1997, Week 5
April 1997, Week 4
April 1997, Week 3
April 1997, Week 2
April 1997, Week 1
March 1997, Week 5
March 1997, Week 4
March 1997, Week 3
March 1997, Week 2
March 1997, Week 1
February 1997, Week 4
February 1997, Week 3
February 1997, Week 2
February 1997, Week 1
January 1997, Week 5
January 1997, Week 4
January 1997, Week 3
January 1997, Week 2
January 1997, Week 1
December 1996, Week 5
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December 1996, Week 3
December 1996, Week 2
December 1996, Week 1
November 1996, Week 5
November 1996, Week 4
November 1996, Week 3
November 1996, Week 2
November 1996, Week 1
October 1996, Week 5
October 1996, Week 4
October 1996, Week 3
October 1996, Week 2
October 1996, Week 1
September 1996, Week 5
September 1996, Week 4
September 1996, Week 3
September 1996, Week 2
September 1996, Week 1
August 1996, Week 5
August 1996, Week 4
August 1996, Week 3
August 1996, Week 2
August 1996, Week 1
July 1996, Week 5
July 1996, Week 4
July 1996, Week 3
July 1996, Week 2
July 1996, Week 1
June 1996, Week 5
June 1996, Week 4
June 1996, Week 3
June 1996, Week 2
June 1996, Week 1
May 1996, Week 5
May 1996, Week 4
May 1996, Week 3
May 1996, Week 2
May 1996, Week 1
April 1996, Week 5
April 1996, Week 4
April 1996, Week 3
April 1996, Week 2
April 1996, Week 1
March 1996, Week 5
March 1996, Week 4
March 1996, Week 3
March 1996, Week 2
March 1996, Week 1
February 1996, Week 5
February 1996, Week 4
February 1996, Week 3
February 1996, Week 2
February 1996, Week 1
January 1996, Week 5
January 1996, Week 4
January 1996, Week 3
January 1996, Week 2
January 1996, Week 1
December 1995, Week 5
December 1995, Week 4
December 1995, Week 3
December 1995, Week 2
December 1995, Week 1
November 1995, Week 5
November 1995, Week 4
November 1995, Week 3
November 1995, Week 2
November 1995, Week 1
October 1995, Week 5
October 1995, Week 4
October 1995, Week 3
October 1995, Week 2
October 1995, Week 1
September 1995, Week 5
September 1995, Week 4
September 1995, Week 3
September 1995, Week 2
September 1995, Week 1
August 1995, Week 5
August 1995, Week 4
August 1995, Week 3
August 1995, Week 2
August 1995, Week 1
July 1995, Week 5
July 1995, Week 4
July 1995, Week 3
July 1995, Week 2
July 1995, Week 1
June 1995, Week 5
June 1995, Week 4
June 1995, Week 3
June 1995, Week 2
June 1995, Week 1
May 1995, Week 5
May 1995, Week 4
May 1995, Week 3
May 1995, Week 2
May 1995, Week 1
April 1995, Week 5
April 1995, Week 4
April 1995, Week 3
April 1995, Week 2
April 1995, Week 1
March 1995, Week 5
March 1995, Week 4
March 1995, Week 3
March 1995, Week 2
March 1995, Week 1
February 1995, Week 5
February 1995, Week 4
February 1995, Week 3
February 1995, Week 2
February 1995, Week 1
January 1995, Week 5
January 1995, Week 4
January 1995, Week 3
January 1995, Week 2
January 1995, Week 1
December 1994, Week 5
December 1994, Week 4
December 1994, Week 3
December 1994, Week 2
December 1994, Week 1
November 1994, Week 5
November 1994, Week 4
November 1994, Week 3
November 1994, Week 2
November 1994, Week 1
October 1994, Week 5
October 1994, Week 4
October 1994, Week 3
October 1994, Week 2
October 1994, Week 1
September 1994, Week 5
September 1994, Week 4
September 1994, Week 3
September 1994, Week 2
September 1994, Week 1
August 1994, Week 5
August 1994, Week 4
August 1994, Week 3
August 1994, Week 2
August 1994, Week 1
July 1994, Week 5
July 1994, Week 4
July 1994, Week 3
July 1994, Week 2
July 1994, Week 1
June 1994, Week 5
June 1994, Week 4
June 1994, Week 3
June 1994, Week 2
June 1994, Week 1
May 1994, Week 5
May 1994, Week 4
May 1994, Week 3
May 1994, Week 2
May 1994, Week 1
April 1994, Week 5
April 1994, Week 4
April 1994, Week 3
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April 1994, Week 1
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