UVMFLOWNET Archives

September 1999

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Subject:
From:
Bill Schroedter <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
UVM Flownet <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Mon, 13 Sep 1999 15:35:40 -0600
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     Lorraine, Is being ambidextrous a prerequisite in your lab? Do
     you have a head rest similar to a dental chair. Without, I
     doubt any of our patients could manage even a resemblance
     holding their head still, especially when I am pushing against
     it.

     Don, I vote for a behind the head position. Best arm support!!

     Bill Schroedter
     Venice,FL.


______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________
Subject: Re: Scanning positions
Author:  UVM Flownet <[log in to unmask]> at Internet
Date:    9/13/99 2:38 PM


Hi Don:
I don't know if this gets you a lunch , but I scan and teach my students to scan
standing behind the patient who is seated.  The right carotid is scanned with
the right hand and for the left side, the patient and his chair are moved to
face the opposite wall.  The left carotid is scanned with the left hand. This
position allows for excellent range of motion for the patient's neck, no
distended jugulars, and good position for viewing the monitor and reaching the
imager controls.
For those patients who can't sit, however, I scan facing the patient.
Lorraine Pearlman
Manager, Vascular Lab
Staten Island University Hospitla
Staten Island, NY

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