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September 1999

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Subject:
From:
B&S McLean <[log in to unmask]>
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Date:
Thu, 16 Sep 1999 01:55:32 -0700
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Don:  This letter reminds me of another technique I have used.  If a
patient is just too hard to get from a wheelchair to a bed or a stretcher,
I'll scan them in the chair, again standing behind them, and treating them
as if they are in a bed and I am just standing or sitting behind them.
Usually works beautifully, but I still sometimes run into the inaccessible
subclavian or vertebral.  Where are you going to lunch?  Stay in touch.
Shirley McLean, RVT

----------
> From: Lorraine Pearlman <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Scanning positions
> Date: Monday, September 13, 1999 11:38 AM
>
> Hi Don:
> I don't know if this gets you a lunch , but I scan and teach my students
to scan
> standing behind the patient who is seated.  The right carotid is scanned
with
> the right hand and for the left side, the patient and his chair are moved
to
> face the opposite wall.  The left carotid is scanned with the left hand.
This
> position allows for excellent range of motion for the patient's neck, no
> distended jugulars, and good position for viewing the monitor and
reaching the
> imager controls.
> For those patients who can't sit, however, I scan facing the patient.
> Lorraine Pearlman
> Manager, Vascular Lab
> Staten Island University Hospitla
> Staten Island, NY

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