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Is the D enrichment a transpiration issue (ie does it vary with the average
humidity of the environment)?  The best way to test this of couse is to
come to Phoenix in August (temp = 110F and Humidity =0).

At 11:23 AM 01/24/2001 -0500, you wrote:
>Back in the Triassic, when I was a girl with a different name, I measured
>dD of blood, urine, and saliva. Whenever any of my colleagues cut their
>fingers, I appeared with a capillary tube. It was not a problem to spin
>down the blood (which goes quickly) and take a few microliters off the top
>for isotope analysis. So, Susan spin quickly, refrigerated 'fuge if
>possible.
>
>Here'a a bit of history regarding Tom Hoering, and is connected to the
>urine measurements. He was an accomplished glassblower, but often times he
>would set his tie on fire or slice his fingers when making vacuum lines. He
>INSISTED on providing a urine sample along with the blood of opportunity.
>I, on the other hand, INSISTED that he spin down his own urine and seal the
>sample in the capillary.
>
>I also had a connection with NIH to collect bllod samples for me before the
>days of HIV/AIDS so I had a host of blood samples from people in the
>Washington, DC area. The summary of my findings were simple--blood and
>urine and saliva were all about 7-8 per mil enriched in deuterium relative
>to drinking water. People who talked alot (AKA verbal diarrhea) were
>enriched in D by another 7 or 8 permil.
>
>You might imagine why this work was never published.
>
>Marilyn Fogel
>
>Dr. Marilyn L. Fogel, Senior Scientist
>Carnegie Institution of Washington
>Geophysical Laboratory
>5251 Broad Branch Rd., NW
>Washington, DC 20015
>USA
>1-202-478-8981
>FAX 202-478-8901
>Main Office 1-202-478-8900
>
Dr. Peter Kroopnick
IT Corporation
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