Print

Print


Skip wrote:

>Shop techs generally adjust cuff cants so that the knee is directly
>over the boot.  There are various gadgets that do this.. some are
>good enough to eyeball.  Another simple mechanism you could try
>is a plumb bob.

**********************

HUH ?

If my knee was directly over my boot I would have to be articulating a bit.
Since I'm somewhat bow-legged my knees are a little outside of the soles of
my boots.  If I stand naturally on a boot that doesn't have canting
adjustment, the outside of the boot's sole holds more of my weight the the
inside of the sole;  hence when straightlining on skis my legs want me to
ride the outside edges,  not good. My point, everybody's hip-knee-boot cuff
line is not plumb,  if fact I doubt most people's are even close.

To cant a boot that has canting adjustment- put the boot on, loosen the
adjustment screw, stomp straight down onto a flat floor, tighten screw.




From: Skip King <[log in to unmask]>

Leigh, the dirty little secret is that boot canting is more for comfort
and bells n whistles than actual performance impovement.  If you
need canting, this needs to be done at the sole - some boots allow
this - or at the binding - some bindings don't.

Shop techs generally adjust cuff cants so that the knee is directly
over the boot.  There are various gadgets that do this.. some are
good enough to eyeball.  Another simple mechanism you could try
is a plumb bob.

skip

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
SkiVt-L is brought to you by the University of Vermont.

To unsubscribe, visit http://list.uvm.edu/archives/skivt-l.html


_________________________________________________________________
Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
SkiVt-L is brought to you by the University of Vermont.

To unsubscribe, visit http://list.uvm.edu/archives/skivt-l.html