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Also interesting is the fact that the baby born on the Mayflower, was
named Peregrine White, since she was born on the journey to America.

-------------------------------------
Larry Berrin
State Education Director
Audubon Vermont
(802) 434-3068

On Wed, 29 May 2002 09:39:18 -0400 Sherry Mahady <[log in to unmask]>
writes:
>HI, Folks --
>
>Thought you might be interested in this piece of bird trivia.
>
>Sherry
>
>
>The Word of the Day for May 29 is:
>peregrine   \PEH-ruh-grun or PEH-ruh-green\   (adjective)
>having a tendency to wander
>Example sentence:
>          "We've rented a charming house, owned by a peregrine widower
>who prefers to migrate between the homes of his six children," wrote
>Carrie in her letter.
>Did you know?
>          The current meaning of "peregrine" has wandered a bit from
>earlier meanings. It originally meant "foreign," as did its Latin
>predecessor "peregrinus." But even before "peregrine" appeared on its
>own in English, it was part of the name of that well-known bird of
>prey, the peregrine falcon. The bird's appellation derives from "Falco
>peregrinus," the Medieval Latin designation given it by the scientist
>Albertus Magnus in the 13th century. "Falco peregrinus" came to be
>thought of as meaning "pilgrim falcon" (rather than "foreign falcon"),
>perhaps because medieval falconers captured peregrines during their
>first flight -- or pilgrimage -- from the nest. That in turn led to a
>new sense of "peregrine" ("engaged in or traveling on a pilgrimage"),
>which was later broadened to "wandering."
>----------------
>Brought to you by Merriam-Webster, Inc.
>http://www.Merriam-Webster.co


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