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Ben Kulas [[log in to unmask]] writes:

>Kill = River in Dutch (Skullkill or is it Scullkyl, etc.)
>
>So Plattekill = Flat River, iow, no rapids.
>
>BTW "splat" = Es ist Platt, It is flat

De nededelandse "kil" betekent "chill" in het engels. "Kill" as "creek"
may be a non-standard Flemishism, but "kill" also means chill in Flemish
(and swamp-Danish). But the standardization of spellings didn't arrive
until the 1930s, and there are plenty of amusing/confusing local idioms
& fallout in the written language and translations.  My first guess was
flat creek but wasn't' so sure. I'll accept it given the number of
stream names. I've never encountered a European usage of "kill" or "kil"
for a body of water.

But is was also common to translate the common Algonquin "tappan"
(meaning "cold water/spring") into "kill" for place names in NY.
(Shouldn't it have really be the "Kill zee" bridge? Or Kill/Tappan
Harbor? Prob'ly was at some point. :-) Maybe it was bad translations
from Algonquin that ended up with kill==river. Every stream in the
mountains qualified as cold water, I s'pose.

There is no "kyl" in modern Dutch (which would be pronlouned "kyle" or
"kowl", depending on the district where you're from.) "River"== "stroom"
of "rivier" in het nederlands.

But I s'pose steppin' in the kill gives one a kil , eh? :-)  Place-names
in NY received all sorts of now-unusual spellings, like the folks from
Breukelen Holland who set up shop in Brooklyn. (Haarlem is a bit easier
to follow.)

dana
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