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Hi, Kevin

Well, first of all...don't try to climb the cedars...I have been suffering
with pretty bad hay fever for the past 3 days since my "escapade"...The
"dust" from the red cedars is absolutely terrible...Usually, when I'm in my
right mind, I wear a long sleeve shirt and a painter's mask (and a hat, of
course...I at least had a hat that evening).

The Olives are double-brooded, except perhaps in northern VT and, for sure,
in adjacent Quebec areas...they're out right now, obviously, down here, so
anytime after this coming week they should be out up there for about 2 to 3
weeks, then there should be another (but I think, smaller) brood in August.
(I'll look up the dates for Quebec in Handfield's book and post them.) A
good clue as to whether they're out is whether there is a nearby source of
nectar...the adults depend upon this, and you will see that the species has
evolved its metamorphic schedule for the adult emergences to coincide with
the blooming of late spring and then mid-late summer nearby wild flowers.
Any time of day from early morning to almost dusk. They nectar at any time,
but peak probably about 9 to 10 AM, then again around noon, and then from
2PM to about 4 or 5PM.

You need a warm, sunny day with at most light winds, preferably not from the
north. A moderate wind, especially if from the north (or east) will
immediately cause them to roost. You should examine the cedar grove in three
areas:

1. Of course, on the cedars in the upper half of the trees...they seem to
prefer mid-growth trees...15 to 20 feet in height. Brisk shaking of the
tree, and/or thumping with a broken branch up to near the top, should flush
them out...If they haven't been severely spooked, they will return to their
initial perch. Harry Pavulaan suggests that they will often descend, even to
the ground, when they've been flushed. I've seen this happen, but it didn't
happen the other day (except for that last specimen that I mentioned, which
came to down to 9 (actually it was more like 12) feet up). You DO need a net
with a pole...Harry also told me something I should have thought about...he
suggested carrying duct tape and a knife, and using these to make an
"emergency net extension" using a long branch...I shoulda thought of that...

 2. They are avid flower visitors, so look for them on nearby flowers -
milkweeds are excellent, also those spring blossoms of cherries, apples,
high-bush blueberries etc. and other low flowers;

3. They also frequently perch on bare earth and/or on damp soil. If there is
a path through the habitat, keep your eyes on it ahead of you.

Good luck, and if you get some, send me (if you can) one or two...we are
curious about the northern populations...you will notice that the specimen
in Handfield's book looks really unusual (you should get that book if you do
not have it, but get the "Scientific Version, $89 CDN...it's a real bargain,
for such an excellent book...but it's in French, but I can help you with
that...)

Alex

> -----Original Message-----
> From: MARIE/KEVIN HEMEON [SMTP:[log in to unmask]]
> Sent: Friday, May 23, 2003 1:35 PM
> To:   [log in to unmask]
> Subject:      Re: another field trip
>
> There is a large area of cedars in Pownal where I hope to find some this
> season. Any tips flight times etc. are appreciated. Kevin
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Grkovich, Alex" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Friday, May 23, 2003 10:29 AM
> Subject: Re: another field trip
>
>
> > Well, good...and remember, if there are any red cedars around, bring
> > poles...
> >
> > > -----Original Message-----
> > > From: Kent McFarland [SMTP:[log in to unmask]]
> > > Sent: Friday, May 23, 2003 10:24 AM
> > > To:   [log in to unmask]
> > > Subject:      another field trip
> > >
> > > We have added another field trip thanks to volunteer Kevin Hemeon.
> > >
> > > July 19, Bennington (Taconic Tristate Audubon Chapter),
> > >                 1 p.m. At the Filmore Pond Retirement Village on RT. 9
> > > just
> > > east
> > >                 of Bennington. Contact Kevin Hemeon at
> > > [log in to unmask]
> > >                 for details. Rain date is July 20.
> > >
> > > Check out the web page for other upcoming field trips.
> > >
> > > Kent
> > >
> > >
> > > _____________________________
> > > Kent P. McFarland
> > > Conservation Biology Dept.
> > > Vermont Institute of Natural Science
> > > 27023 Church Hill Road
> > > Woodstock, VT   05091   USA
> > > 802-457-2779 x124
> > > www.vinsweb.org
> > > [log in to unmask]
> > > _____________________________
> > >
> > >
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CAUTION PLEASE NOTE: The information contained in this transmission is
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