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I just went with the Olympus Stylus 400.   Basic point and shoot, with
Armour plating and a nearly water proof container.   With my Canon APS I
frequently got pictures embossed with fog patterns after lunch.   Hopefully
this will improve the situation.

The Olumpus uses the xD Picture Card which they say uses a faster and more
efficient chip.   This should reduce shutter lag and battery drain.   Got an
extra battery just in case.

Dick


----- Original Message -----
From: "Jeremy Malczyk" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Sunday, October 26, 2003 2:48 PM
Subject: [SKIVT-L] Digital cams (was RE: A few pics of snow...)


> But you still have to pay for film and developing!
> Add up what you spend on that over the course of a couple years and it's a
lot easier to justify switching. Canon released a digital EOS Rebel camera
body in August. Accepts the standard SLR lenses. 6.3 MP. You can find it
online for around $900. A lotta money, but that's a lot better than the
$4000-6000 digital SLRs went for just a couple years ago.  Of course on top
of that $900 you're gonna want a 1 GB memory card ($250), spare battery,
more lenses, yada yada...
>
> I want one, but needed a good small point and shoot first, cause that's a
camera that'll actually get used for skiing and climbing. Hauling an SLR
around skiing is a major PITA, admit it. So I went looking for something
small with res acceptable for web pics and a good range of manual functions.
Ended up getting a Canon A70.
>
> What I like...
> Pretty small but easy to hold. It has the same mode dial as an EOS (M P Av
Tv, etc etc) which is what I'm used to. Has a manual focus, aperture and
shutter speed settings that are easy to use (you don't have to wade through
10 menus to get to them). Takes 2.5 fps, which is enough for me. Takes
640x480 movies with sound. 4 AA batteries instead of the usual 2, hopefully
that means it lasts longer on a charge. Shutter lag isn't as bad as other
digital cameras I've used, especially if you use the manual settings.
>
> What I don't like...
> The aperture range is really small compared to SLR lenses (although I
guess that's what you'd expect with such a small lens). Finding a filter or
something to protect the lens is proving difficult, but they're out there
(exactly how they attach is a mystery -- no threads). Only things included
were a paltry 16MB CF card and some crappy alkaline batteries.
>
> Anyone else have this one?
>
> Jerm
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: David Guertin [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
> Sent: Saturday, October 25, 2003 10:50 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [SKIVT-L] A few pics of snow...
>
>
> >>>>> "Chromer" == Chromer  <Chromer> writes:
>
>     Chromer> (film? how quaint!)
>
> Sign me up on the quaint photo team. After years of hearing how
>
> a) digital photography has finally equalled film quality; and
> b) digital cameras are really cheap now
>
> I finally decided to convert my SLR setup to digital. Then I priced
> what a digital setup comparable to my modest SLR camera and lenses
> would cost. Alas, I discovered that a) and b) above are mutually
> exclusive.
>
> So I kept the old SLR and bought a film scanner instead, at about
> 1/10th the price. It's a lot of fun, plus I can digitize all my old
> slides and negatives.
>
> Dave G.
>
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