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On Thu, 12 Feb 2004 17:06:02 -0500, Rich K <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>My buddy and I pulled a guy out of one at Whistler.  We were maybe 10' into
>the woods skiing parallel to a trail with a fresh 18" on the ground.  I
>skied right past the guy and didn't see or hear him.  My buddy caught
>something out of the corner of his eye and yelled to me to stop.  The guy
>was in his forties (I thought a little old at the time but now I see he was
>just a pup) and at the brink of exhaustion.  I thought a good heart attack
>possibility.  He had righted himself but was too low to grab a branch.  The
>tree itself was either too fat or too skinny or too smooth to shimmy up in
>ski boots and he spent all his energy trying. And as Duff wrote it was like
>quicksand, the more he floundered the worse it got, the more fatigued and
>the more panicked.  It took the two of us and our equipment (poles etc.) to
>pull him out.  He said he was in there for a while and was horse from
>yelling.  I think the snow surrounding him just sucked up any sound he
made.
>Although he was just off a busy trail no one could see or hear him.  He was
>very relieved to be out and I learned to be very careful to avoid tree
>wells.  I didn't really understand the hazard till that experience.


Rich -

Wow.  Thanks for that story.  Does anyone have any advice as to the safe
distance one should keep from a tree in order to avoid these incidents?
Doesn't seem like it would be much of a problem here in the East (or is
it?).  Are there any types of trees, terrain, situations or conditions
where we should be especially aware?
>----- Original Message -----
>From: "Matt Duffy" <[log in to unmask]>
>To: <[log in to unmask]>
>Sent: Thursday, February 12, 2004 4:22 PM
>Subject: Re: [SKIVT-L] Tree Well Burying
>
>
>> Non-releasable bindings make it more of a problem to get out.  If a
person
>> happens to fall right next to a tree, it can very easily get ugly. The
>> canopy of an evergreen keeps the snow a bit shallower and less
>> consolodated around the trunk. I imagine that falling in would be a bit
>> like stepping into quicksand.
>>
>> On Thu, 12 Feb 2004 14:09:58 -0700, Peter Salts <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:
>>
>> > I am having a hard time conceptualizing
>> >this.  Exactly how does one get caught in a tree well? Assuming deep
>> >snow, one might be caught upside down with skis caught in branches and
>> >unable to click out of the bindings.  Any other circumstances?
>> >
>>
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