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Squaw reporting a 15' base now. Looking forward to my trip there and I'll be
happy with sunny Sierra ski days and afternoons by the pool although I
certainly wouldn't mind a powder day or two.

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Skiing Discussion and Snow Reports
[mailto:[log in to unmask]]On Behalf Of Tom Moore
Sent: Monday, March 01, 2004 11:53 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [SKIVT-L] Storms continue to POUND west and southeast U.S.


On Fri, 2004-02-27 at 09:57, Scott Braaten wrote:

> The storm that slammed into the west coast was incredible.  Wind gusts of
> 80-100 mph on the high Sierra ridgelines with awesome amounts of snow.
Winds across the Pacific crest (i.e., on the ridge that Sugar Bowl,
Squaw Valley, and Alpine Meadows) in the 80-100 mph during storm cycles
are "typical". It gets a bit more interesting when the winds are a
sustained 120 mph and gusting to 180 mph.

We, the Lake Tahoe area, had a good slam on 1 January. While patrolling
at the Sugar Bowl, we only opened two of the bottom lifts - something
akin to Inverness at SBN or North Slope at Stowe. Wind transport was
about 18" an hour. Snow was sticking to my face. The California whoses
retreated from the conditions. My only comment was thankfully it wasn't
cold. Been out here for five seasons now and haven't lost all of my
Vermont blood yet. :-) Must admit that it was the best one day storm
I've seen.

What I still don't understand is why two individuals decided to travel
in the backcountry that day. One died in an avalanche on a low angle
slope which just happened to be under a 37 degree slope that also had an
overhanging cornice. The survivor took out his F1 transceiver, unplugged
it, and searched for his partner who had an M2 transceiver. To bad that
the M2 wasn't turned on. To bad that the survivor turned off his
transceiver completely as he didn't how to use the beacon. But I digress
. . .

> Sugarbowl's reporting 58 inches new as well with a base of 185 inches.
Well at the summit.

Actually thought the storm total was 49" but who is going to quibble
over 9". Snow fell on a freeze/thaw layer and was moving fairly well
when bombs were dropped. Thursday was definitely the snow pig day with
to many face shots to remember and my teeth hurting with all the snow
being kicked up. Friday however was for the fine diner with only 9" new
but in the 8% range. Even though I was stationed on the
beginner/intermediate terrain, still found some shots to keep me happy.

> Nearly 100 inches new snow in the past 2-3 days...holy tihs.

Makes for interesting avi conditions. Nice thing is that the backcountry
is *usually* *fairly* stable within 48 hours of the end cycle because of
the deep marine snowpack and good bonding. However life is "interesting"
during the storm days. Good time to stay inbounds, if we are operating,
and stay in the "controlled" areas.

> WE NEED SNOW IN THE NORTHEAST!  I think its time for some sort of
> sacrifice or something.
P-Tex candles are a good place to start.

~Tom

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