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Hi All!    My husband had seen turkeys in display between 6-7am afew mornings
in a row so we got up earl on Saturday to see them. Sure enough there they
were- in fact there were two groups- each with a displaying male. The big male
in the first group seemed to be dancing on a platform, a rock perhaps?- which
turned ou to be a flattened female. He continued to go back and forth from one
foot to the other until we noticed a few feathers on her rump lifting up and
then just like that he jumped offand she got up and ran off. Just like that.
Talk about timing. That group took off toward the woods and we went and watched
the other group across the street. They were so  close to the road we didn't
need binocs. The dispaying male was gigantic and I noticed he had these blood
red growths below his wattle which turned white after a while and then turned
back to red again. There was a much younger male also giving it a try though he
had no spurs. The females were seemingly unimpressed and continued to scratch
the ground. At just about 7am they turned and went in the woods.
On the way home just past Huntington Village we ran into an immature broad
wing- the first of the season for us- Just into Huntington Center we saw a flock
of Bohemian waxwings and a grackle displaying on a wire.
The biggest treat came later, however, at home. A fox sparrow was working the
ground under the feeder vigorously with twenty or so juncos. This, I believe,
is the same fox sparrow that has visited us every spring and every fall since
the spring of 2001. It comes by itself and stays only one day.
Just incidentally, we have a courting pair of barred owls close to home who
go back and forth- one calls in a low , "Who cooks for you," while the other
answers in a much higher pitch. This seems to be true of a pair of ravens who
frequent our area as well. Does anyone know about the pitches of courting bird
calls?

happy birding,

LAURIE on the mountain in


Starksboro