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These are the answers from the medlib.





Here's one that I especially like...
http://www.cancer.org/docroot/PUB/content/PUB_1_1_American_Cancer_Societysbr
Complementary_and_AlternativebrCancer_Methods_Handbook.asp


The Medical Library Association, Collection Development Section Web site,
Subject lists:
http://colldev.mlanet.org/subject.html

Free access, not required to be a member to view this.



How about:

Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine.  Gale 2001

Alternative Medicine for the Elderly.  Springer, 2003

Essentials of complementary and alternative medicine.   (Eds. Jonas et al,
Williams & Wilkins, 1999)

Illustrated Encyclopedia of Healing Remedies.    Element Books Ltd., 1998

Alternative Health & Medicine Encyclopedia.  Gale, 1998


Hi, Alba.  Check out MLA's Collection Development Section's website:
http://colldev.mlanet.org/subject.html  They have a section on Alternative
Medicine.




That said, if you're looking for evidence based/allopathic
explanations/teaching on alternative medicine Churchill Livingstone is
probably the best publisher. They have a large title list. They use people
who know what they are talking about. They have a strong evidence based
bias.

The Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine (2 vols) by Michael Murray and Joseph
Pizzorno is a classic and reasonably up to date text.
Werbach's books on nutritional medicine are standards.
Chiropractic Technique by Thomas Bergmann and Dave Peterson is the standard
American text book on Chiropractic
Herbal Medicine: Kerry Bone has a recent text out, Herbal Drugs and
Phytopharmaceuticals by Bissett (based on commission E), Natural Products
Review, Tyler's Honest Herbal (which everyone buys but which rarely gets
checked out).




I'm not sure if this will help you but I am sending you some links from the
Naturopathic College here in Portland, Oregon that references website links
and their journal collection.
The Library's collection:
http://www.ncnm.edu/a6library/printjournalsprint.cfm (many are allopathic
titles)
and their recommended sites: http://www.ncnm.edu/a6library/altmedlinks.htm



Ebsco has a nice database, Alt-Health Watch.

http://www.epnet.com/academic/althw.asp

Lots of FT online, good titles, too.


The Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database is the most useful alt. med.
reference I've found and it's available in book form for a relatively low
price.  See description at Amazon.com:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/096761368X/qid=1084472817/sr=8
-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl14/102-7408836-8328946?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

Some useful web-based resources are listed at:

http://www.unmc.edu/library/pharm/natural.html



Here are a few of my favorites:

Complementary/alternative medicine : an evidence-based approach.  Spencer,
J. St. Louis : Mosby, c1999.

Tyler's honest herbal : a sensible guide to the use of herbs and related
remedies / Steven Foster and Varro E. Tyler.  London : Haworth, 2000.  ISBN
0789008750.

Professional's handbook of complementary & alternative medicines.
Springhouse, Pa. ; [Oxford] : Springhouse, c2001.  ISBN 1582550980.

Textbook of natural medicine / edited by Joseph E. Pizzorno, Jr., Michael T.

Murray.  St. Louis, MO : Mosby, 1999.

Mosby's complementary & alternative medicine : a research-based approach /
Lyn W. Freeman, G. Frank Lawlis. St. Louis, Mo. : Mosby, c2001 (I think
there might be a newer edition out now) ISBN 0323006973.



I'm more current on the good herb books than on general alternative
medicine.
I like "Principles and Practice of Phytotherapy: Modern Herbal Medicine" by
Simon Mills and Kerry Bone, published by Churchhill Livingstone.
  Two others come to mind  "Clinical Botanical Medicine" by Eric Yarnell and
some other folks; and the American Botanical Council? Guide.  I'll try to
get
you the exact info on it if you can't find it easily.  One of the unusual
thing
about the ABC guide is that physicians can get CME from it.
  I think these books are more scientifically based than many others, but I
am
sure I will think of others later on.



We take "Alternative Medicine Alert" as the only subject journal. It's
published by American Health Consultants. Pretty pricey




This is one not on the Brandon-Hill List, but should have been:

Fetrow CH, Avila JR. Professional's handbook to complementary and
alternative medicines. 3rd ed. Lippincott, Williams, and Wilkins. 2003.
http://www.lww.com/products/?1-58255-243-6

They have a patient education version on the Nursing list, but the
professional version made none of the lists.  The authors use an evidence
based approach to evaluating all types of dietary supplements.

Hope this helps.

---------------------------------------------------------------
Alba Scott
Librarian, Sacramento Campus
Western Career College
8909 Folsom Blvd.
Sacramento, CA 95826
(916) 361-1660 ext. 644
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--------------------------------------------------------------
"Quem mal lÍ, mal fala, mal ouve, mal vÍ." (Monteiro Lobato)
 "Who barely reads, barely speaks, barely listens, barely sees."