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While doing point counts this summer, my crew and I have come across 5 and
possibly 6 Sedge Wrens in various parts of the Champlain Valley.    These
birds have an interesting breeding strategy in the midwest, in which they
first nest at northern locations, migrate south to mid-latitudes, and nest
again.  We had 2 or 3 birds in May, which were likely migrants, and 3 more
in the past week, which might prove to be nesting.  If you are still doing
some atlassing, keep your ears alert for the chatter of these birds'
song.  They are typically found in wetter hayfields or in the swampy
margins of slow-flowing creeks.  The birds we have found have been south of
Middlebury, but on private land, so I can't give out any more information
about their locations.  But, if we have stumbled across a few, there are
likely more around.

Allan



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Allan M. Strong
University of Vermont
The Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources
347 Aiken Center
Burlington, VT 05405
802-656-2910
Please note new email address
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