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Patrick Haskell contemplates -
>I don't know how easy it is to get to on a modern Suby, but I suppose I
>should check since mine is getting on 150,000 miles.)

My experience is there is no "checking".  Through much pain I've learned not
to be "pro-active/pre-emptive with thermostats, they can be very finicky.
If it is working at 150,000 or more just leave it alone.  A "check" will
only be followed by problems.  If you must, buy a new one, keep it in the
box and toss it in under your seat.  If you don't carry tools with you,
figure out what wrench you'd need and add that under your seat (if you need
to replace it on the fly you can but let the motor cool or/and be very
careful not to get burned).
Let sleeping dogs lie!
Rich

----- Original Message -----
From: "Haskell, Patrick" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Friday, January 07, 2005 12:27 PM
Subject: Re: [SKIVT-L] %&@#! tease!


> John Crowley, Jr. asks:
> > I drove my Subaru (with great tires, BTW) over a stormy Bay Bridge
> > this morning to the car shop, instead of over Donner Summit last night
> > at 10 pm (before the storm), because the temperature gauge spiked to
> > the red zone while crossing the Bryte Bend Bridge in Sacramento early
> > last night with heat/defrost running on full.  I checked: no leaks,
> > plenty of coolant, fan running properly; I even had the thing in on
> > Wednesday for work to fix the heat/defrost (I hope they didn't somehow
> > mess with the thermostat - any ideas anyone?).
>
>
> Thermostats can be damaged pretty easily.  The thermocouple, especially
> if older, could have been broken during maintenance without obvious
> negligence.  They're super cheap (~$10 at the parts shop last I needed
> one).  They're also easy to replace if you know where to find them.  (At
> least it was no problem on to do on two previous 1980s era cars.  I
> don't know how easy it is to get to on a modern Suby, but I suppose I
> should check since mine is getting on 150,000 miles.)  The thermostat is
> typically located near a fitting for a hose connecting radiator to the
> engine and just need to be popped back in (with the proper orientation).
>
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