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Of course, the teachers are to be included in such plans. Of course the
adults have to be trained first. Isn't that written in our tech plans ?
It is in ours on page 314. Professional development during one half of
an  in-service day at the beginning of school ! Just kidding.

If adults and students had their own station though...

Here's one:

Take a computer lab,
180 days per year,
with 60% utilization over a 'school year,'
Over the life cycle of a computer under warranty (3 years) that
computer gets used about 324 days over a three year life span.
Not a great use of resources.
That's about $3.40 cents ( for an $1100 comuter and related software)
per academic day. Multiply by, say 25 stations: $85 per day. Per lab.
There's 85 kids served in a one to one model out of the gate. Didn't
have to dig too deep to find resources for 85 kids out of the gate.

Add in electronic access to public domain materials, all those switched
port costs, all that power used to juice a traditional lab - and air
conditioning dough that you'll save and the numbers start making sense.

Add up those expenses vs what's being learned and how it's utilized
currently. How much time would we save by not moving gear around and
configuring computer labs ? There's some dough for sure.

I'm a firm believer in teacher empowerment and professional
development. The learning kids could do if they had these tools full
time though, with or without curriculum integration, is often overlooked
as if it should all be school controlled and all be routed through
professional development. Having been in network admin and tech support
for 15 years, the majority of my learning is not done in class and it's
certainly not done with a tremendous amount of access and policy
restrictions.  Having the tools in hand enhances the power of teachers -
for everybody for sure. Now the collaboration possibilties around that
model get interesting.

Here's an interesting one found by David Curtis here at SB:

http://redmondmag.com/features/article.asp?editorialsid=468

Adam



>>> [log in to unmask] 3/14/2005 11:37:48 AM >>>
There might be something said for empowering teachers
collaboratively... before students.

Mark Arnold, Technology Integration Specialist
Morristown School District
Morrisville, Vermont
(802) 888-6729 (w)
(802) 879-1615 (h)
[log in to unmask]



________________________________

From: School Information Technology Discussion on behalf of Adam
Provost
Sent: Mon 3/14/2005 10:28 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Microsoft Longhorn - Educational Horizon



The debate when I was in school was over the word processor as in:
Should kids be allowed to use one ?  Many kids, obviously, were in
favor
of it. Especially when we saw that you could add 1.5 spaces between
lines per page - or 1.25 for the sharp teachers. Now that's an
advantage
of technology - moving from lined to unlined paper. Saved me loads of
time. Equity of access was a problem back then too.

Exciting stuff this collaboration, but how will collaboration software
actually be used in education ? There's a question. Sure going to be
tough to do in a lab once per week ! Strange to think that kids would
be
collaborating with each other over longhorn while in the same room. We
could strap kids  into their VR helmets, plug in a feeding tube, and
charge parents through ecommerce to leave there kid plugged in until
they can arrive. Kind of like feeding coins into a parking meter. Aka
the Matrix we may be able to harness kids electrical energy and resell
it to the local power grid. Now there's some money in that. All those
little batteries. Buildings could be redesigned like the droid
stacking
ships in episode I. Big space saver and drastically reduces the need
for
traffic floor areas etc, etc.

Don't get me wrong. I'll never bash any collaboration software or
people who send in links or ideas ( thanks Mark). Collaboration tools
are great. Getting things in the hands of kids is the item for thought
here. The tools can lead to great things. Blogs, im, access to
resources
and tool strenghts, and equity of access are doing something great in
education where they are used - if kids have access to them.

One of my favorite quotes: " I see your tech plan and raise you three
hundred pages."   Gary Stager

1 to 1 computing is where this is headed - or should. We'll have
longhorn in labs and kids will go home and use Windows 95 and Word Pad
or linux. I'll bet less than 25% of the kids in South Burlington have
MS
Office Pro or premium, or office for that matter. How many will have
longhorn and by when ? By the time they get it at home, 5 years will
have passed and we'll be using something else. Adults that's another
matter.

What will security policies do with collaboration tools that are
already locked down ?

Cobb County, Georgia just bought in to the tune of 63,000 laptop
computers. http://www.cobb.k12.ga.us/powertolearn/main_index.htm
Still think it can't be done ?

We're listening to Sinatra right now. Fly Me to The Moon.

Rant, rant, rant. Adam

Adam Provost
Bay City Rockers, SBSD
http://district.sbschools.net/dns



>>> [log in to unmask] 3/14/2005 8:27:05 AM >>>
>>> [log in to unmask] 03/14/05 8:01 AM >>>
> if you flipped the pen just
>right, it would stick into the floor or even the ceiling.   You could
also
>create a nice little spray of ink if you did it just right.

And don't forget the clever "pigtail in the inkwell" ploy which you
only did to girls you had a crush on - and then wondered why they
didn't
seem to be interested in you.


>Of course, we were also crawling under our desks and covering our
heads in
>nuclear attack drills.

You're not doing that anymore!?!


-Vince







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