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Throwing fuel on the fire:

If we were talking about income taxes, the guy with the $1,000,000 place
would be taxed at $20/1,000 instead of $10, and it would be called "paying
his fair share".

Paul T.


On Mon, 11 Jul 2005 17:03:26 -0400, Skip wrote:

> At 04:30 PM 7/11/2005, Chris G wrote:
> >So we should make the total bill for a million dollar mansion the same as
> >for a doublewide?  I think keeping the rates the same is more equal.
>
>
> Chris - do yourself a favor and go take an Econ 101 class.  No one is
> saying that the total tax bill for a McMansion should be the same as it is
> for a doublewide.  That would be silly.  The argument is that tax RATES -
> the amount of tax per $1000 of assessed valuation - shouldn't be punitive
> in towns that have more high-value homes, merely because they have more
> high value homes.
>
> Let's take your example, assuming that the doublewide in question and the
> property it sits on is worth $75,000.  If the tax rate per $1000 of
> assessed valuation is $10, that means this guy's annual taxes are 75 X 10
> or $750.  The guy with the fancy crib, subject to the same $10 per $1000,
> would pay 1000 X 10 or $10,000 per year in property taxes.  No one's got a
> problem with that.  With me so far?
>
> The issue is that Vermont actually taxes differently than that.
>
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