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It's a new school year and time for me to throw down the gauntlet once
more and defend the world of us old codgers.

Singapore has been "eating our lunch" for years - without the benefit
of any creativity.  Singapore needs more creativity.  We may need less.
A musician may be tremendously creative, but if he doesn't learn the
technique to play his instrument, he'll never be able to express that
creativity effectively.

As for Friedman, he shoots from the hip.  His book, "The World Is
Flat", jumps to a lot of conclusions that sell books but don't
necessarily stand up under closer examination.  There's an interesting
article in this month's "Atlantic Monthly", "The World in Numbers", that
presents, if not an opposing view to Friedman's, at least a more careful
analysis of some of the phenomena he refers to.

BTW, starting Monday, us regular slobs won't be able to get to
Friedman's (and other Op/Ed regular's) columns online without ponying up
40 bucks.  It was good while it lasted (not Friedman, but the Op/Eds in
general), but I may have to break the bank and go for it since they
don't have home delivery of the N.Y. Times in Montpelier.

Vince


-- 

Vincent Rossano
Information Technology Director
Montpelier Public Schools
58 Barre Street
Montpelier, VT 05602

802-225-8690
[log in to unmask]

>>> On 9/16/2005 at 10:49:55 am, in message
<[log in to unmask]>, [log in to unmask]
wrote:
> Still Eating Our Lunch
> By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
> New York TImes
> Published: September 16, 2005
> 
> Singapore
> 
> Singapore is a country that takes the Internet seriously. Last week 

> its Ministry of Defense granted a deferment for the country's  
> compulsory National Service to a Singaporean teenager so he could  
> finish competing in the finals of the World Cyber Games - the  
> Olympics of online war games.
> 
> Being a tiny city-state of four million, Singapore is obsessed with 

> nurturing every ounce of talent of every single citizen. That is why,
 
> although its fourth and eighth graders already score at the top of  
> the Timss international math and science tests, Singapore has been  
> introducing more innovations into schools. Its government understands
 
> that in a flattening world, where more and more jobs can go anywhere,
 
> it's not enough to just stay ahead of its neighbors. It has to stay 

> ahead of everyone - including us.
> 
> Message to America: They are not racing us to the bottom. They are  
> racing us to the top.
> 
> Continued at http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/16/opinion/ 
> 16friedman.html?incamp=article_popular_2