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>Monarch Watch Update - November 30, 2005
>http://www.MonarchWatch.org
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>==========================================
>
>Contents:
>
>1) Status of the Population
>
>2) Michoacan Reforestation Foundation (MRF)
>
>3) Papalotzin
>
>4) Monarch Conference
>
>5) A Late Bloomer for Your Monarch Waystation
>
>6) A Praying Mantis Ate My Tagged Monarch!
>
>7) Illegal Logging Continues in Mexico
>
>8) Western Monarch Round-up
>
>9) Holiday Shopping
>
>10) About Our Update List
>
>==========================================
>
>Unless otherwise noted, all content was authored by Chip Taylor, 
>edited by Jim Lovett and Sarah Schmidt, and published by Jim Lovett. 
>The complete web version of this update is available at: 
>http://www.MonarchWatch.org/update/2005/1130.html
>
>==========================================
>
>1) Status of the Population
>
>The evidence continues to mount; the all-time low monarch population 
>of 2.19 hectares in 2004/2005 will soon be a distant memory. Large 
>numbers of monarchs began to arrive in the vicinity of the 
>overwintering sites during the last days of October in time for the 
>Day of the Dead (1 November). The arriving monarchs typically move 
>from place to place for a few weeks before colonies are completely 
>formed. New monarchs continue to arrive in the area through early 
>December. Once the colonies are well established (mid December) 
>Eduardo Rendon and his team from World Wildlife Fund Mexico will 
>begin to count the trees and measure the areas occupied by monarchs 
>at each site. I'm still predicting that the total area for all 
>colonies combined with be in the range of seven to nine hectares, 
>with the lower figure being more likely. ...
>
>[ Read the full text of this article at 
>http://www.MonarchWatch.org/update/2005/1130.html#1 ]
>
>==========================================
>
>2) Michoacan Reforestation Foundation (MRF)
>
>Those of you who follow monarch conservation issues closely may be 
>familiar with the Michoacan Reforestation Foundation. This 
>foundation is dedicated to the reforestation of private lands near 
>the monarch overwintering sites in Mexico. The goal is to lessen the 
>demand for the trees within the protected areas by creating sources 
>of wood near, but outside, the monarch reserves. The foundation 
>raises funds that are then directed to the La Cruz Habitat 
>Protection Project in Mexico to pay for the development of 
>seedlings. These seedlings are given to landowners who are 
>instructed in the planting and care of the young plants. Each plot 
>is subsequently monitored to establish the success of the plantings 
>and to give the landowner further advice regarding the care of the 
>young trees. The trees are harvested (thinned) on a five-year 
>schedule with a planned final harvest at 15 years. ...
>
>[ Read the full text of this article at 
>http://www.MonarchWatch.org/update/2005/1130.html#2 ]
>
>==========================================
>
>3) Papalotzin
>
>Do you ever imagine what it is like to be in some one else's shoes? 
>I don't do this often, but news of the arrival of the Papalotzin in 
>Mexico gave me pause to think of what it must have been like to be 
>Vico Gutierrez as he maneuvered the Papalotzin to come in for a 
>landing on the two lane highway near the entrance to Sierra Chincua. 
>Imagine the highway surrounded by well-wishers and officials, 
>including the Governor of the state of Michoacan, and as you descend 
>you can't help but think that this is the end of a great adventure, 
>perhaps the greatest adventure of your life. You try to concentrate 
>on the landing, ever worried about a small thermal or a cross wind 
>that might cause you to abort the landing or veer off the targeted 
>center line of the highway, but it is hard not to reflect on the 
>years of work it took to put the Papalotzin journey together. ...
>
>[ Read the full text of this article at 
>http://www.MonarchWatch.org/update/2005/1130.html#3 ]
>
>==========================================
>
>4) Monarch Conference
>
>The number of scientists studying monarchs is small, but they are 
>dedicated to discovering answers to new and old questions associated 
>with monarchs and their conservation. There are also several 
>programs, such as Monarch Watch, Journey North, and the Monarch 
>Larva Monitoring Project, that encourage public involvement in 
>monarch research. Monarchs and monarch conservation continue to be 
>in the spotlight, so monarch scientists meet every four years or so 
>(e.g. 1993,1997, 2001) to share their research findings with each 
>other, the participants in the aforementioned programs and the 
>public. This year's meeting will be held on the 8th and 9th of 
>December at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis 
>Obispo, California. ...
>
>[ Read the full text of this article at 
>http://www.MonarchWatch.org/update/2005/1130.html#4 ]
>
>==========================================
>
>5) A Late Bloomer for Your Monarch Waystation
>
>We are very lucky at Monarch Watch to be assisted by a number of 
>volunteers at our public events and our other activities through the 
>year. Our Monarch Waystation is the result of a volunteer effort by 
>the local Master Gardeners, particularly Margarete Johnson. 
>Margarete devotes a lot of time, energy, and creativity to managing 
>the garden. This past season was the second year for the garden and 
>by fall all of Margarete's hard work was rewarded by the appearance 
>of large numbers of fall butterflies. Monarch larvae were so 
>abundant that they had to be removed from the plants and raised 
>elsewhere, so that visitors could see that the garden actually 
>contained milkweeds! ...
>
>[ Read the full text of this article at 
>http://www.MonarchWatch.org/update/2005/1130.html#5 ]
>
>==========================================
>
>6) A Praying Mantis Ate My Tagged Monarch!
>
>The proportion of the migrating monarchs that die en route to Mexico 
>is unknown. Monarchs tagged with our circular tags are found dead 
>each year within the United States but the number is relatively low. 
>There has been the occasional tagged monarch found in a spider's web 
>or on the grill of a car or truck, but normally the actual cause of 
>death is not obvious to the person who finds the tagged monarch. 
>Judy Molnar, an Education Associate of the Virginia Living Museum in 
>Newport News, alerted us to the fate of a female monarch. ...
>
>[ Read the full text of this article at 
>http://www.MonarchWatch.org/update/2005/1130.html#6 ]
>
>==========================================
>
>7) Illegal Logging Continues in Mexico
>
>The following text is a translation of an article by the well known 
>Mexican author and conservationist, Homero Aridjis. We are indebted 
>to Carol Cullar, Executive Director, Rio Bravo Nature Center 
>Foundation, Inc. of Eagle Pass TX, for translating the article. 
>Carol provided the following note concerning the translation: The 
>word "talamontes" in Spanish means "Claw the mountain. It derives 
>from the word for rape and utter destruction/devastation. Where the 
>author intended, I've translated the word "tala" as "destruction" 
>and at other times "illegal logging." ...
>
>[ Read the full text of this article at 
>http://www.MonarchWatch.org/update/2005/1130.html#7 ]
>
>==========================================
>
>8) Western Monarch Round-up
>By Mia Monroe
>
>Monarch observers are watching closely to see just how this 2005-6 
>season shapes up since normal patterns are already a bit out of 
>kilter at the regional level. Oddly, numbers throughout the state 
>seem "normal". In the northern part of the range (Sonoma and Marin), 
>individuals have been spotted flying in the area, but no 
>overwintering clusters have been observed. However, just across San 
>Francisco Bay, the San Leandro Golf Course reports three times the 
>number usually seen at this time of year, according to Naturalist 
>Adrienne DePonte. Natural Bridges also has monarchs and, continuing 
>south, Pacific Grove may have up to 12,000 (a strong showing for 
>early in the season), as observed by biologist Jessica Griffiths 
>(Ventana Wilderness Society). ...
>
>[ Read the full text of this article at 
>http://www.MonarchWatch.org/update/2005/1130.html#8 ]
>
>==========================================
>
>9) Holiday Shopping
>
>Looking for that perfect gift for the nature lover in your life? Be 
>sure to browse through the Monarch Watch Shop online at
>
>http://Shop.MonarchWatch.org
>
>where you'll find 1,000s of nature-related items. Remember, each and 
>every purchase in the Monarch Watch Shop helps support our 
>education, conservation, and research programs.
>Thank you for your continued support and Happy Holidays!
>
>==========================================
>
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