Print

Print


An idea for this is to buy locally grown shrubs. If you are in an area that doesn't currently have an out break of these beetles and bring in a shrub with an infestation, well. You should burn the infested shrub instead of just putting it on a brush pile. The eggs will still hatch and if there are any wild Vibs. nearby, the infestation will spread. There are resistant spp. of Vibs. but, they are non-native. This may be important to some.
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Michele Patenaude<mailto:[log in to unmask]> 
  To: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]> 
  Sent: Friday, January 20, 2006 9:42 AM
  Subject: [VTBIRD] Viburnum


  Early in January, someone suggested high bush cranberry (Viburnum
  trilobum)as a shrub that attracts birds. I would suggest against
  planting this and any other viburnums. I planted one of these shrubs a
  two years ago and it was immediately attacked by virburnum leaf beetles.
  I took the appropriate countermeasures of removing the larvae and, in
  fall, snipping off the branches where the female adults laid eggs. The
  bush was smaller after the snipping than when I first planted it. Last
  spring the beetles completely skeletonized the shrub again. Finally I
  gave up and dug the shrub out and put it on my brush pile. 
   
  This is a new pest but a very difficult one. Information about this pest
  can be found at http://www.hort.cornell.edu/vlb/id.html<http://www.hort.cornell.edu/vlb/id.html>
   
  Michele Patenaude
  172 Woodbury Road
  Burlington, Vermont  05401
  Phone: 802-862-4085
  E-mail: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>