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We agree with Larry 100%. We have a 60mm Nikon Fieldscope III ED with an
angled lens. I am 6' 3" and my wife Barbara is 5' 4" and we love this scope.
It is Light, compact and sharp. We have had many compliments from other
birders who have the pricier scopes. After using ours they wish they had
looked at the Fieldscope first. Try  <http://www.eagleoptics.com/>
www.eagleoptics.com <http://www.eagleoptics.com/>  
Al Merritt
W. Brattleboro
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Larry and Mona
Rogers
Sent: Thursday, July 06, 2006 8:20 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [VTBIRD] Re;Spotting Scope Question - Straight vs. Angled
 
    I don't know anything about the Swift Nighthawk scope that Miriam
Lawrence inquired about, although I also like my Swift Audubon binoculars a
lot.
    Miriam asked:
 
        Also, any strong opinions out there on angled vs. straight viewing?
The
        Nighthawk is available both ways, and I understand there are pros
and cons
        to each.
 
    Mona and I have an angled 60mm Nikon FieldScope, and it works very well
for us.  I'm about 5' 11"' and Mona about 5' 3".  With this difference in
heights, an angled scope is pretty much the only way that we can both view
the same bird.  An angled scope is a little harder to point, at least at
first, but you get used to it pretty quickly.  If you are planning to use
your scope with children, (as Miriam implies), an angled scope has big
advantages.
    Optic prices are highly variable, but the general trend is upward.  Our
FieldScope cost something around $300 about 15 years ago; the last time I
looked, Nikon was quoting it at something near $800.  List prices don't mean
much, but I imagine the street price is around $500.  
    It's a really excellent 60mm scope and weighs a lot less than an 80mm.
Scope weight per se is not terribly important, but a bigger scope requires a
heavier tripod, and this does make a difference.
    Hope this helps.
        Larry Rogers